UT News » Blog Archive » Law student wins two national writing competitions for health law research

UT News

Categories

Search News

Archives

Resources

Law student wins two national writing competitions for health law research

Mark Fadel, a student in the College of Law pursuing the joint doctor of medicine/juris doctor, won first place in both the American College of Legal Medicine and the Epstein Becker Green Health Law writing competitions.

Fadel was named the Hirsh Award winner in the American College of Legal Medicine (ACLM) Student Writing Competition.

Fadel

The ACLM is the preeminent national organization for law and medicine. As the first-place winner, Fadel presented his research for “360 Years of Measles: Limiting Liberty Now for a Healthier Future” at the ACLM 2018 Annual Meeting in Charleston, S.C.

“State-based school immunization laws form the bedrock of compulsory vaccination efforts in the United States,” Fadel said. “However, a spectrum of these mandates permitting exemptions exists and has been shown to contribute to measles incidence. My goal in this research is to show how the permissiveness of these laws drives medical outcomes, and how different laws produce different population health statistics during outbreaks.”

Fadel also won first place in the Epstein Becker Green Health Law Writing Competition for a different paper, “Insurance Practices and Disparities in Access to Assisted Reproductive Technologies.”

His second article focused on variation in state laws related to insurance coverage for infertility treatments and the disparities between groups able to access such procedures.

“Mark’s work exemplifies the power of our joint-degree curriculum,” said Associate Professor Elizabeth McCuskey, who co-directs the University’s juris doctor/ doctor of medicine and juris doctor/master of public health joint degree programs. “His legal education informs his perspective on health care, and his medical education informs his perspective on law as a health-care intervention.

“Interdisciplinary work is essential to health-care regulation and reform, and Mark is poised to be among the next generation of health-care leaders. I am so pleased that Mark’s work has attracted national attention from top practitioners in both fields. It is well-deserved.”

Fadel recently was accepted to present his insurance disparities research at the 41st Annual Health Law Professors Conference in Cleveland in June. His research paper also was accepted for publication in the Florida Coastal Law Review this summer.