UT News » 2009 » December 

UT News

Categories

Search News

Archives

Resources

Archive for December, 2009

Faculty featured in special section of Ohio Magazine

Bjorkman

Bjorkman

Each issue of Ohio Magazine is about the people, places and trends that define the rich culture of the Buckeye State.

In a special section of the December issue titled “Excellence in Education,” Ohio Magazine featured some of the most memorable educators from some of the state’s top colleges and universities, including four professors from The University of Toledo.

Goel

Goel

The UT educators included in the section were all named Distinguished University Professors last spring. They are:

Dr. Karen Bjorkman, professor and interim chair of physics and astronomy. The section stated, “Karen S. Bjorkman is an observational astronomer who does research in the area of circumstellar disks, as well as teaching astronomy and astrophysics classes. She is actively involved in efforts to provide mentoring for young women in science and to increase the representation of women in science.”

Kaderavek

Kaderavek

Dr. Vijay Goel, endowed chair and McMaster-Gardner professor of orthopedic bioengineering in the College of Engineering and the College of Medicine, and co-director of the Engineering Center for Orthopedic Research Excellence. “Vijay K. Goel has been instrumental in the development, implementation and assessment of the Department of Bioengineering’s subtract in orthopedic biomechanics, including teaching and research labs,” the article stated. “He also incorporates findings of basic and applied research in orthopedics into his classroom teaching.”

Viola

Viola

Dr. Joan Kaderavek, professor of early childhood, physical and special education. “Joan N. Kaderavek is a nationally recognized scholar in early literacy and language development,” the special section stated. “She trains professionals to identify young children who are at risk for reading problems during the preschool years so that children avoid a lifetime of academic failure.”

Dr. Ronald Viola, professor of chemistry. “Colleagues in the National Academy of Sciences attest to Ronald Viola’s reputation as a world-class scientist with expertise in the biosynthesis of several essential amino acids, their implications in the development of therapeutic agents, and the pathogenesis of disorders of amino acid metabolism,” according to the section.

Business undergraduates compete, win at KeyBank event

Three University of Toledo College of Business Administration undergraduate students were among the participants in the 2009 KeyBank Undergraduate Student Leadership and Creativity Symposium held fall semester at Ohio State University.

And by the end of the event, one UT student was among the winners.

“The students, Ryanico Reyna, Savannah Tilman and Jordan Johnson, were selected by their GPA and an essay explaining why they wanted to participate in the symposium,” explained Dr. Terribeth Gordon-Moore, associate dean of the UT College of Business Administration. “They attended workshops on leadership, creativity and use of Excel in the business world.”

Other schools with students participating included the University of Cincinnati, University of North Carolina, University of Minnesota, University of Wisconsin and University of Washington.

Students were placed into groups of six, given a case to explore, and had to prepare a presentation for a panel of KeyBank judges.

Reyna, a junior majoring in professional sales and marketing, said, “We were to uncover issues that were making an exclusive restaurant in Spain lose profits. The judging panel gave each group two hours to prepare, then each group made a 20-minute presentation with our unique recommendations that would generate more profits for this restaurant.”

Reyna’s team won the competition, resulting in each team member receiving a $1,000 scholarship.

“Personally, I was very proud of myself,” Reyna said, “knowing that students from all over the country were competing at a high level. I felt I was among the elite in the country. All six of us had unique ideas that made our team more diverse and successful. It feels very rewarding being on the winning team.”

He added, “I enjoyed every moment of this symposium. I feel my experience with the KeyBank competition gave me more of an understanding of the special skills needed to obtain high-caliber leadership ability.”

“Congratulations to Ryanico Reyna for being a member of the winning team and receiving a $1,000 scholarship,” Gordon-Moore added.

Professor elected president of Association of Rehabilitation Nurses

At the Association of Rehabilitation Nurses 35th Annual Educational Conference, Dr. Linda Pierce, UT professor of nursing, took on a new role: president-elect.

As an active member of the association for more than 20 years, Pierce will be able to include president to her list of accomplishments when she takes over the top spot in 2010.

Pierce has held multiple leadership positions prior to this election; she served on task forces and committees of the Rehabilitation Nursing Foundation, which is the arm of the association that funds research in rehabilitation nursing practice.

She also served as chair of the Rehabilitation Nursing Foundation Board of Trustees from 2006 until 2008 and has served on the Association of Rehabilitation Nurses’ Board of Directors since 2003.

Pierce said she is delighted at the opportunity to serve her colleagues and is looking forward to what the future holds for the association.

“The future of the Association of Rehabilitation Nurses lies in the strategic plan and its big hairy audacious goal: to reshape health care by integrating rehabilitation nursing concepts into care for all people.”

The goal of the association is to reshape health care by integrating rehabilitation nursing concepts into the care for all people with objectives targeted at leadership, research, government relations and professional development.

Pierce holds a doctor of philosophy in nursing from Wayne State University and master of science and bachelor of science degrees in nursing from the University of Akron.

External Affairs earns regional awards

The Division of External Affairs earned several Crystal Awards during a reception held last month.

webaom-poster-final-copy1Departments that contributed to the awards include the Center for Creative Instruction, Health-Care Marketing, University Marketing and University Communications. The Department of Intercollegiate Athletics lent its prose to an award, as well.

UT earned Crystal Awards for the following projects:

• 2009 Art on the Mall Poster, poster category;

• UT Medical Center Why Hospitals Should Fly Invite, invitations category;

• Seed Money/UT Guarantee Direct Mail Package, direct mail campaign category;

• UT Rockets Football Tickets, digital media category; and

• Coach Beckman Web Site, nonprofit Web site, under $10,000 category.

UT also was the recipient of several Merit Awards of Achievement for the following projects: “Let’s Bring Our Boys Out!” for single feature story; Spring 2009 Toledo Alumni Magazine, annual report/magazine; 2009 NCAA Division 1 Men’s Golf Championships Poster, poster category; UT Virtual Campus Tours, student media category; and WXUT Web site, nonprofit Web site, under $10,000 category.

“Just looking at the array of awards we earned says a lot about the diverse talents of our division,” said Lawrence J. Burns, UT vice president for external affairs and interim vice president for equity and diversity. “The trend toward interactive communications challenges us to explore new and innovative methods of getting the word out. Every member of our team continues to push the envelope of creativity with award-winning results.”

The Crystal Awards, sponsored by the Toledo chapter of the Association for Women in Communication, honor communications professionals in northwest Ohio and southeast Michigan for excellence in advertising, collateral materials, design, digital media, industry self-promotion, photography, public relations, TV/radio, and writing for news or public relations.

Surgery without scarring subject of UT Matters this month

Using Single Incision Laparoscopic Surgery, UT surgeons are able to keep skin flawless by making incisions inside the belly button.

Using Single Incision Laparoscopic Surgery, UT surgeons are able to keep skin flawless by making incisions inside the belly button.

UT Matters is a partnership with The Blade and Buckeye CableSystem to bring the community health science education and the latest news about how University faculty, staff and students are changing Toledo and how the community can be a part of it.

This month UT Matters focuses on the surgical techniques that have advanced immensely as surgery has gone from being open to minimally invasive.

The University of Toledo Medical Center is the first facility in northwest Ohio to introduce the most recent evolution of minimally invasive surgery, Single Incision Laparoscopic Surgery. Among the many benefits, it provides patients with no visible scarring. The procedure requires a single incision inside the belly button. The opening is typically 1.5 to 2.5 centimeters long — between the size of a paper staple and the diameter of a quarter. Because of the location and size of the incision, the small scar isn’t visible.

To learn more about Single Incision Laparoscopic Surgery at UT Medical Center, call 877.451.2299 or visit UTMatters.com.

Power on, solar field online at Scott Park

Power was restored to the Scott Park Campus just before 2 p.m.; this included the addition of a new 1.12 megawatt solar field.

The outage had been planned for this morning to connect the solar field to the grid, but was extended several hours as crews replaced older parts of the electrical system.

The solar field is temporarily the largest in the state of Ohio (larger fields will be completed in the coming months) and is a key component of UT’s efforts to transform Scott Park into a Campus of Energy and Innovation.

More information on that transformation and on the solar field click here.

UT Medical Center neurologist wins Stroke Innovation Award

Dr. Gretchen Tietjen, professor and chair of neurology, has received the Stroke Innovation Award by the internationally acclaimed journal Stroke for her original investigation published in its September 2009 issue in an article titled “Migraine and Biomarkers of Endothelial Activation in Young Women.”

The investigation explored the relationship between migraine and stroke, and was conducted in UT’s Department of Neurology. The work was funded by her UT Translational Research Stimulation Award and by a research grant from GlaxoSmithKline.

“’Innovation’ is defined broadly; it can be a new approach, a new methodology, new interpretation of existing data or new data with far-reaching implications,” wrote Dr. Vladimir Hachinski, editor-in-chief of Stroke, in a letter to Tietjen informing her she had won.

“I am very honored and surprised to receive this award, as migraine-related research is often not recognized and valued within the stroke scientific community,” Tietjen said. “I am very appreciative of The University of Toledo and GlaxoSmithKline for supporting my research.”

This annual award was established by the journal in 2008 and is to be given during the Stroke symposium at the International Stroke Conference of the American Heart Association in San Antonio Feb. 25.

In 2008, Tietjen’s translational work was awarded the Seymour Solomon Research Lecture Award at the 50th annual scientific meeting of the American Headache Society in Boston.

This year Tietjen has authored or co-authored 12 original research articles and reviews in prestigious scientific journals.

Professor honored with Toastmasters International Leadership Award

Dr. Clint Longenecker posed for a photo with the 2009 Toastmasters International Communications and Leadership Award with Toastmaster officers, from left, Lt. Gov. of Education and Training Vera Johnson, International Director Kristal DiCarlo, Lt. Gov. of Marketing Robynn Diamond, District Gov. Nancy Zychowicz and Area 3 Gov. and Fall  Conference Chair Heather Lane, who is an alumna of the UT College of Business Administration.

Dr. Clint Longenecker posed for a photo holding the 2009 Toastmasters International Communications and Leadership Award with Toastmaster officers, from left, Lt. Gov. of Education and Training Vera Johnson, International Director Kristal DiCarlo, Lt. Gov. of Marketing Robynn Diamond, District Gov. Nancy Zychowicz and Area 3 Gov. and Fall Conference Chair Heather Lane, who is an alumna of the UT College of Business Administration.

During the recent Toastmasters International Conference in Toledo, Dr. Clinton Longenecker, UT professor of management, received the prestigious Toastmasters International Communications and Leadership Award 2009 for his significant contributions in business.

Presented at the organization’s district conference in November, the award recognizes a business leader who has demonstrated outstanding communication and leadership skills as defined by Toastmaster International, a nonprofit educational organization with more than 211,000 members in 10,500 clubs in 90 countries throughout the world.

“Dr. Longenecker is the recipient of this award for the difference that he has made in the lives of business leaders across the country as an educator, researcher, author, consultant and speaker,” said Toastmasters spokesperson Heather Lane. “He is committed to helping others achieve their full potential and become successful as leaders.”

“I am truly humbled by this recognition,” Longnecker said. “I try to make people a priority in everything I do, and helping people is a particular passion of mine because I enjoy seeing the success people can achieve when they are inspired and take action toward their goals and dreams.”

Lane said Longenecker’s most recent book, The Two-Minute Drill: Lessons for Rapid Organizational Improvement from America’s Greatest Game, has helped numerous organizations and businesses across the United States deal with economic challenges.

Employees honored for student-centered efforts

Since 2006, The University of Toledo Students First Committee has recognized faculty and staff members who go above and beyond their job requirements every day to help students and ensure their success.

Dr. Brian Randolph, left, posed for a photo with President Lloyd Jacobs and Michele Martinez, interim dean of students, after winning the 2008-09 Students First Award.

Dr. Brian Randolph, left, posed for a photo with President Lloyd Jacobs and Michele Martinez, interim dean of students, after winning the 2008-09 Students First Award.

Twenty nominees and recipients of the 2008-09 Students First Award gathered recently in the Faculty Club Lounge on Health Science Campus. President Lloyd Jacobs was present to congratulate each individual on his or her outstanding dedication to UT students.

“It is important to act as a recipient for cultural change and an exemplar of what our university stands for,” Jacobs said. “I know that you share something with me — a deep commitment to help equip people for a full, complete and prosperous life.”

Jacobs went on to explain the importance of student-centeredness at UT.

“The single most important thing is to care for other people and to make it clear in all sorts of ways — how one speaks, how one acts, and how one carries oneself,” Jacobs said. “It’s many traits and actions, but ultimately its one commitment, and that is to recognize that students are at the center of what a great university does.”

In addition to the monthly recipients, each individual nominated for the award was invited to attend the event. Individuals recognized during the event included Drs. Carol Bennett-Clarke, Mary Ellen Edwards, Alexia Metz, Richard Phinney, Susan Pocotte, Brian Randolph, Gwendolyn Walters and David Weldy, as well as Katherine Abu-Absi, Brittani Curtis, Melanie Dusseau, Jill Gierke, Charlene Hansen, Karen Hoblet, Lula Johnson-Ham, Jing Meyer, Diane Pfaff, Cecilia Rivera, Cheryl Thomas and Ashleigh Wade.

All award nominees and recipients received a certificate, specially designed pin, and photo with Jacobs. In addition, all award recipients received two gift certificates — one worth $75 for the UT Bookstore and the other worth $25 for Starbucks.

Randolph, associate dean in the College of Engineering, was chosen as the 2008-09 individual Students First Award winner and received a $1,000 check for his outstanding commitment to students.

For more information on the Students First Award or to nominate an individual, visit http://www.utoledo.edu/commissions/studentcenterdness/nominees06.html.

UT Medical Center recognized for high organ donation rate

For the second consecutive year, The University of Toledo Medical Center has been recognized for its success in increasing the number of organs available for transplantation.

Mark Chastang joined, from left, Kristen Calkins, Cindy Schneider and Norma Tomlinson to accept Silver Medals of Honor from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services for increasing the number of organs available for transplant. Carolyn Ruge of Life Connection of Ohio, far right, also attended the ceremony.

Mark Chastang joined, from left, Kristen Calkins, Cindy Schneider and Norma Tomlinson to accept Silver Medals of Honor from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services for increasing the number of organs available for transplant. Carolyn Ruge of Life Connection of Ohio, far right, also attended the ceremony.

Members of the UT team, including Kristen Calkins, registered nurse and director of trauma services, and Cindy Schneider, registered nurse and transplant administrator, joined Mark Chastang, UTMC vice president and executive director, and Norma Tomlinson, UTMC associate vice president and associate executive director, in accepting Silver Medals of Honor during a recent operational leadership team meeting on Health Science Campus.

The medals, given by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, recognize UT’s success in increasing the number of organs available for transplant.

UT Medical Center was recognized for having eight or more eligible organ donors during a 22-month award period ending in April and for meeting one of three additional criteria: improving donation rates, increasing the number of organs donated per individual donor to 3.75 or higher, and expanding clinical processes for recovering organs.

“As a transplant center, we strive to be good leaders in the area of organ donation,” Tomlinson said. “It’s a compilation of teamwork from everyone in the program — from our staff, to our physicians, to organizations such as Life Connection — working together at a time that is very difficult for donors’ families.”

UTMC, she continued, has made a commitment toward best practices in organ donation by taking part in state and national collaboratives on organ donation and applying those best practices. The medical center was the first medical facility in greater Toledo to enact policy and procedure based on cardiac death criteria.

Carolyn Ruge, chief operating officer of Life Connection of Ohio, which works closely with local organ procurement and transplantation programs, was on hand when UT’s team received the medals.

“Organ donation is an important part of the end-of-life process,” Ruge said. “There are roughly 25 organ donors each year in northwest Ohio. People are usually surprised and think the number should be much higher. It could be if discussion about organ donation and peoples’ wishes were addressed at times other than those of great loss.”

Ohio citizens can get information about donation and enter the state’s organ donor registry at www.donatelifeohio.org.