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$1 million gift from couple to expand UT research into pancreatic cancer

Toledo businessman Hal Fetterman and his wife, Susan Fetterman, have pledged $1 million to The University of Toledo to fund new research into treatments for pancreatic cancer, the third leading cause of cancer death in the United States.

The donation is in honor of Hal Fetterman’s sister, Joyce Schwyn, and three close friends who lost their lives to pancreatic cancer.

Hal Fetterman, center, was thanked last week by Dr. Christopher Cooper, executive vice president of clinical affairs and dean of the College of Medicine and Life Sciences, and President Sharon L. Gaber after signing a pledge to give the University $1 million to research pancreatic cancer treatments.

“They were the ones who inspired me to go in this particular direction,” Fetterman said. “There are people passing away from pancreatic cancer all the time. The ultimate goal of this gift would be a cure for the disease.”

The Fetterman’s donation will establish the UT Medical Center Pancreatic Cancer Research Innovation Fund. Half of the gift will be dedicated to recruiting a top-tier faculty researcher to the UT College of Medicine and Life Sciences. The remaining $500,000 will be split between covering the costs of an upcoming clinical drug trial at UT Medical Center and supporting a grant competition among faculty cancer researchers.

“The University of Toledo is grateful for the incredible generosity of Hal and Susan Fetterman,” UT President Sharon L. Gaber said. “The Fettermans have been loyal supporters of UT for years, and this new investment in the University will support important advances in medical care.”

Pancreatic cancer is relatively rare accounting for just 3 percent of all new cancer cases in the United States, but it is to blame for 7 percent of all cancer deaths. According to the National Cancer Institute, only lung cancer and colon cancer kill more Americans than pancreatic cancer.

Dr. F. Charles Brunicardi, the John Howard Endowed Professor of Pancreatic Surgery and director of the cancer program in the College of Medicine and Life Sciences, said there is already promising research being done at UT, and the Fettermans’ gift will take it to the next step.

“I’m deeply honored by the Fettermans’ generosity and their devotion toward finding better treatments for pancreatic cancer,” Brunicardi said. “We feel that we’re on the verge of a big breakthrough. We can cure mice of pancreatic cancer. What we need to do now is translate that into clinical trials, and this grant will allow us to do that.”

Fetterman felt it was important that someone make a sizeable donation to draw more attention to the cause and hopefully additional resources to advance treatment options.

“Somebody’s got to break the ice. I think that more people need to get involved with things like this,” Fetterman said. “It’s not necessarily wanting to leave a legacy, but I can’t take it with me. God’s been good to me. I didn’t go to college, and I didn’t have wealthy parents. I’m basically a farm boy from out in Fulton County. I want to do what I can to help people have a better life.”

The Fettermans are longtime supporters of UT. In 2007, the couple donated $1 million to the UT Athletic Department to build an indoor multi-sport practice facility that would ultimately become the Fetterman Training Center. They also established the Scott Raymond Fetterman Memorial Scholarship Fund in 1996 for UT engineering students.

Day of Giving events Oct. 16 and 17

Get ready and get involved: UT’s annual Day of Giving is this week.

The fundraising campaign, Rocket Forward: You Launch Lives, will begin at midnight Tuesday, Oct. 16, and will last until noon Wednesday, Oct. 17.

Alumni, faculty and staff members, students, and friends of the University who support its mission are encouraged to give during this second annual Day of Giving. Go to rocketforward.utoledo.edu.

And check out some of the events taking place Tuesday, Oct. 16:

• Meet and Greet with the President from 8 to 9 a.m. in the Collier Building. Dr. Sharon L. Gaber will meet students, pose for selfies, and pass out doughnuts and apples.

• Fall Fest from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Law Center. Donate to decorate mini-pumpkins and mugs; play cornhole, ring toss and horseshoes; and eat kettle corn, caramel apples and cider.

• Day of Giving Carnival from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Centennial Mall. Stop by for games, food trucks and the dog-petting station. Participants can donate dollars for coins to play games, at which they can earn tickets for prizes; donations may be made with cash, credit cards and Rocket dollars. It’s $1 to pet a pup!

• Taco Tuesday from noon to 2 p.m. in Rocket Hall. Donations will be accepted for lunch at this event sponsored by University College.

• Zumba Class at 8 p.m. between Ottawa East and Ottawa West. Donate to attend the class.

From 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. Wednesday, Oct. 17, stop by Rocket Hall Room 1300 and pick up a bagel or doughnut for a donation.

For a complete list of events, go to utfoundation.org/rocketforward/events.html.

Every donor and every dollar will make a difference in this 36-hour campaign to raise money for student scholarships, athletic and educational programs, and resources for UT’s academic colleges, among many other areas.

Gifts to rocketforward.utoledo.edu during the Day of Giving can be designated to specific funds that support causes donors are passionate about, and there are more than 2,000 funds to support.

Day of Giving set for Oct. 16

The University of Toledo provides students with so many opportunities for success, and UT’s annual Day of Giving is a chance for the entire campus community to help students reach their goals by giving to Rocket Forward: You Launch Lives.

Alumni, faculty and staff members, students and friends of the University who support its mission are encouraged to give during this second annual Day of Giving. The fundraising campaign will begin at midnight Tuesday, Oct. 16, and will last until noon Wednesday, Oct. 17.

Every donor and every dollar will make a difference in this 36-hour campaign to raise money for student scholarships, athletic and educational programs, and resources for UT’s academic colleges, among many other areas.

“We encourage Rockets everywhere to join together on Oct. 16 and 17 to give back and have a significant impact on the lives of our students and all that The University of Toledo does to support them,” UT President Sharon L. Gaber said. “Philanthropy is essential to continuing the University’s mission to educate the next generation of leaders. I look forward to the possibilities of the combined efforts of our global, national and local alumni and friends when they support our Day of Giving and keep UT moving forward.”

Participation is an important goal for Day of Giving, which aims to encourage as many people as possible to support the University. Gift matches and gift challenges are ideal options for making a donation because they double the investment and double the impact.

In 2017, an anonymous donor challenged the colleges to compete for Day of Giving participants to support them. The College of Nursing and the College of Arts and Letters led the colleges, garnering the support of 99 and 95 donors, respectively. The colleges also received the additional $5,000 (Nursing) and $4,000 (Arts and Letters) for their progress funds via the donor’s gift.

“Last year was our first Day of Giving and it was a huge success,” said Charlene Gilbert, dean and professor of the College of Arts and Letters. “Our faculty and staff had the second highest number of donors. Their generosity demonstrated their deep belief in the mission of the University and the college. The money raised last year allowed us to provide strategic support to students who were close to graduating and just needed a little financial assistance. The result of that was our ability to graduate a record number of students and contribute to the University’s overall increase in our six-year graduation rate.”

Despite the rain last year on Day of Giving, students, faculty and staff members came out to Centennial Mall for free cupcakes handed out by the president, to hear the UT Rocket Marching Band perform, and to cozy up with some canines at a popular dog-petting station. Multiple activities are planned for Oct. 16 to celebrate the day and raise awareness of the opportunity to give.

For early risers, the Student Recreation Center will offer a Rise and Shine cycling class at 6:15 a.m. Oct. 16. With a $5 donation to Rocket Forward: You Launch Lives, you can attend the class, which also will be open to non-members of the center.

The UT community is invited to Centennial Mall from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Oct. 16 when WXUT FM 88.3 will provide popular music entertainment. Student-run organizations will offer booths featuring carnival-style games. Participants can donate dollars for game tickets, and donations may be made with cash, credit cards and Rocket dollars. Dog-petting will return to this year’s Day of Giving Centennial Mall event, and for a $1 donation you can pet a pup. Foodies can get their fill by visiting three food trucks that will be on the scene: Koral Hamburg, The Leaf and Seed, and Holey Toledough Handcrafted Doughnuts.

On Health Science Campus, giving stations will be located in the Collier Building and the Four Seasons Bistro inside UT Medical Center. The College of Nursing will host activities, as well.

Click here for a full list of Day of Giving events.

Gifts to rocketforward.utoledo.edu during the Day of Giving can be designated to specific funds that support causes donors are passionate about, and there are more than 2,000 funds to support.

Support UT Oct. 16 and 17 during its Day of Giving, Rocket Forward: You Launch Lives fundraising campaign, and remember to share messages and encourage others to give using #rocketforward.

Homecoming Gala to recognize Gold, Blue T, Young Alum award recipients

The University of Toledo Alumni Association will honor the winners of its most prestigious honors: the Gold T, Blue T and Edward H. Schmidt Outstanding Young Alum Award.

These three recipients will be recognized — along with distinguished alumni from each UT college — at the Homecoming Gala Friday, Oct. 5, at 6 p.m. in the Thompson Student Union Auditorium.

Tickets for the gala are $30 per person, $10 for children. To make a reservation, visit toledoalumni.org or contact the UT Alumni Office at 419.530.ALUM (2586).

Montgomery

The Gold T is presented to a UT graduate in recognition of outstanding achievement in his or her field of endeavor while providing leadership and noteworthy service to the community.

The 2018 recipient is Betty Montgomery. She received a law degree from the University in 1976 and began blazing trails. In 1995, Montgomery became the first woman to serve as attorney general in the state of Ohio. She served a four-year term and was re-elected to another four-year term. In 2003, she ran for auditor of the state of Ohio. Again she was a trendsetter, becoming the first woman to hold that four-year title in the more than 200-year history of the Buckeye State.

Before that, Montgomery spent seven years as a state senator for District 2, covering Ottawa, Wood and parts of Lucas and Erie counties. She also served as Wood County’s prosecuting attorney for eight years, during which time she was the only woman prosecuting attorney in Ohio.

Wakefield

The Blue T is presented to a UT Alumni Association member and University graduate who has made outstanding contributions to the progress and development of the Alumni Association and his or her alma mater.

Dr. Tom Wakefield is the 2018 recipient. He received an undergraduate degree in premed in 1970 and a medical degree from the former Medical College of Ohio in 1973.

Wakefield is the James C. Stanley Professor of Surgery, section head of vascular surgery and director of the Frankel Cardiovascular Center at the University of Michigan. He has received nearly $26 million in funded grants for vascular research. Wakefield is passionate about his alma mater. He served as president of the Alumni Association during the 2014-15 school year and is a major financial supporter of the College of Medicine and Life Sciences; the Athletics Department; the Alumni Association; and the Catharine S. Eberly Center for Women.

Ladd

The Edward H. Schmidt Outstanding Young Alum Award is presented to a University graduate who is 40 years or younger in recognition of outstanding achievement in her or his field of endeavor, while providing leadership and noteworthy service to the Alumni Association, University or community. This award is named in memory of the 1942 alumnus and a longtime supporter of the University and its Alumni Association.

The 2018 recipient is Dr. Mallory Ladd, who earned a bachelor’s degree from the College of Arts and Sciences and the Jesup Scott Honors College in 2011.
A recent graduate of the University of Tennessee’s PhD program, Ladd has been hired by the federally funded Center for Naval Analysis in Washington, D.C. She is an internationally recognized scientist who has developed mass spectrometry tools to measure the chemistry of soils in the Artic, which is viewed as a tipping-point area for climate change. Ladd also has served as a panelist at the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting in Germany.

For more information, contact Dan Saevig, UT associate vice president of alumni engagement, at 419.530.4008.

Independent coffee shop to open in Gateway

An independent coffee shop is coming soon to the Gateway Plaza at The University of Toledo.

Brew is expected to open to the public at the end of the year in time for the start of spring semester at the retail center on the corner of UT Main Campus on Secor Road at Dorr Street.

Jennifer Erd, owner of Brew, is excited the coffee shop will be moving to the Gateway Plaza.

The coffee bar will be located between Barnes & Noble University Bookstore and Huntington Bank. It is moving to Gateway from its original location near campus on the south side of Dorr Street.

“We love coffee, and we opened our business in 2016 because we felt there was a need for coffee shops around the UT area,” Jennifer Erd, owner of Brew, said. “Approximately 70 percent of our customers are students, so being closer to student housing, faculty and classrooms makes sense. Plus, Gateway gives us double the space.”

Brew serves coffee from Zingerman’s Coffee in Ann Arbor, along with local, made-from-scratch pastries and desserts from All Crumbs Artesian Bakery, 7 Little Cupcakes, Libby’s 17 Second Cookies, and So Sweet Lebanese and French Pastries.

“We also hope to add craft beer, wine and ice cream to our menu,” Erd said. “Along with being an awesome local coffee shop, we want people to think of us as a nice, after-dinner option, too. We will continue to promote local artists by displaying and selling their work and offering open-mic sessions every month.”

“Brew will be a great addition to Gateway,” Brenda Lee, president of the UT Foundation, said. “We are excited for them to join our vibrant campus.”

Brew will be located on the south end of the Gateway, which also includes Rice Blvd., Verizon Wireless Zone, Great Clips, Jimmy John’s, Bubble Tea and Domino’s Pizza.

Judith Herb College of Education to dedicate new center

The Judith Herb College of Education will dedicate a new center Thursday, Oct. 4.

The mission of the Herb Innovation Center is to evaluate and inspire peer-reviewed research in the college to improve and advance education and endow a great society.

UT alumna and benefactor Judith Herb will be at the ceremony.

“We are excited to unveil this new center that will empower faculty and students to conduct research with the ultimate goal of improving learning,” said Dr. Raymond Witte, dean of the Judith Herb College of Education. “We are grateful to Judith Herb for her generosity and dedication to her alma mater, and for her belief in the power of education.”

In 2006, Judith and Marvin Herb, and their sons, Thomas and Jon, contributed $15 million to fund numerous scholarships as well as educational assessment support and research initiatives in the College of Education. The Herbs designated $8 million of the gift for the Herb Scholars Fund, with another $4.25 million going to support the Herb Research Initiatives Fund, which bonded together researchers with a common interest in learning. The remaining $2.75 million funded the creation of a faculty development and electronic assessment support system fund. Additionally, to recognize the single largest donation in school history, the college was renamed in honor of Judith Herb.

The ceremony will be held at 4 p.m. in Gillham Hall third floor lobby. A short ceremony is scheduled for 4:15 p.m. with an open house to follow.

RSVPs are requested by Friday, Sept. 28; go to utoledo.edu/education/dedication.

Teachers’ Garage Sale to take place Sept. 29

The UT Judith Herb College of Education Alumni Affiliate will hold a Teachers’ Garage Sale Saturday, Sept. 29.

The event will take place from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Driscoll Alumni Center Bryan Board Room.

Local teachers and community members have donated classroom and office supplies for the sale.

The money raised during this one-day event will support the First-Year Teacher Fund. This scholarship benefits a senior pursuing a degree in education in the UT Judith Herb College of Education.

For more information or to make a donation to the First-Year Teacher Fund, go to https://give2ut.utoledo.edu or contact the UT Foundation at 419.530.7730.

Women & Philanthropy awards two grants to College of Medicine

Women & Philanthropy, a volunteer organization that promotes The University of Toledo through grants to UT initiatives, has given 2018 grants in the amount of $69,348.44.

The first grant for $63,400 was awarded to the College of Medicine and Life Sciences to create the Women & Philanthropy Thrombosis and Hemostasis Research Center. This grant will address a significant gap in the University’s ability to assess thrombosis in human patient and rodent samples.

Scientists in the college are focusing on diseases that have significant mortality due to thrombotic complications and in projects surrounding cancer-induced thrombosis.

“The ability to find reliable diagnostic tests or markers that will accurately characterize the risk of developing a clot is vital,” Marcy McMahon, chair of Women & Philanthropy, said. “While the scientists can do certain assays associated with assessing clotting, they do not have the necessary equipment to perform platelet aggregometry and complete blood counts.”

The new equipment will have broad-ranging applications from autoimmune to metabolic disease. Investigators in multiple departments will be able to highlight the Thrombosis and Hemostasis Research Center in grant applications to organizations such as the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation to help secure more research funding for investigators and The University of Toledo.

The second grant for $5,948.44 also went to the College of Medicine and Life Sciences to provide for photoscreening of infants and children at well-care visits.

The Spot Vision Screener to be utilized requires minimal patient cooperation, bypassing traditional screening methods. It will allow infants and toddlers to be screened, along with older children with significant developmental disabilities.

“This screening is important in order to reduce the risk of amblyopia, a condition that causes permanent vision impairment but is preventable if vision problems are recognized early,” McMahon said.

Women & Philanthropy at The University of Toledo was chartered in 2006 and made its first award to UT in 2008. Through this giving circle, members of diverse backgrounds and interests work collaboratively to make positive, meaningful and immediate impacts at the University.

Women & Philanthropy has given a total of 19 grants totaling $493,687.44 to The University of Toledo during the past 10 years.

Applications for 2019 grants will be available in late fall.

Additional information about Women & Philanthropy is available at
utfoundation.org/give/women-philanthropy.

Art on the Mall to return to campus July 29

Art on the Mall will take over UT’s Centennial Mall Sunday, July 29, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

This summer marks the free, public event’s 26th year of showcasing a variety of art on Main Campus. Attendees will have the opportunity to view all kinds of art, including acrylic, glass, jewelry, mixed media, photography, pottery and more.

“We welcome and encourage everyone to attend one of northwest Ohio’s signature art shows,” said Ansley Abrams-Frederick, director of alumni programming in the UT Office of Alumni and Annual Engagement. “It’s a great way to spend a summer day — looking at amazing artwork on our beautiful campus.”

A total of 115 artists will have artwork for sale by cash, or guests can pay using a credit card at the artist’s booth or credit card station located in the Thompson Student Union.

Representatives from the Ft. Wayne Museum of Art will jury the works with prizes being awarded to the top artists. UT’s Best of Show award will be given to an artist with an affiliation to the University; students, faculty, staff, retirees, alumni and parents are eligible for this honor.

Throughout the event, guests can listen to live jazz with performances from UT student and alumni groups Minor Frett and the Twenty TwentyFour.

Food and beverages will be for sale throughout the day from vendors that will include Big C’s Smoked Barbeque, Karen Anne’s Kettle Corn, Opa! Gyros, Java Sensations/Let’s Go Nuts, Quinn’s Concessions, Jeanie’s Comfort Cuisine, Snowie Daze, the Petite Fleet, and K & K Concessions.

A beer and wine garden will be at Art on the Mall and offer a selection of adult beverages for guests 21 and older with a valid ID. This year the show will feature three varieties of craft beer from one of the area’s newest establishments, Patron Saints Brewery on Bancroft Street.

In addition, faculty and students from UT’s Ceramics Program in the Department of Art will demonstrate their skills in front of the Thompson Student Union and give guests the chance to “throw a pot.” The UT art students also will have a booth with their work available for sale.

And an area for young artists will allow children to create their own masterpieces.

Free parking for the event will be available in lot 1 south, lot 1 north and lot 13 with a golf cart shuttle service to transport guests and their purchases to and from Centennial Mall if needed.

Art on the Mall is supported by community sponsors 13abc, The Andersons Inc., The Blade, the Toledo-Lucas County Port Authority, Mail It, The University of Toledo Federal Credit Union and 101.5 The River.

For more information on Art on the Mall, contact Abrams-Frederick at 419.530.4316 or ansley.abrams@utoledo.edu.

Tradition continues: National Youth Sports Program brings kids to campus

Fun and learning — that’s what the National Youth Sports Program (NYSP) is all about.

A total of 140 income-eligible children came to campus last month for the free three-week program that provides recreational and educational opportunities.

Braylin Elam, a student at St. Francis di Sales High School, jumped in the pool at the Student Recreation Center.

Along with sports programs, the students learned about nutrition, enhancing their self-image, the value of communication, healthy behaviors, and how to resist peer pressure.

Starting in 1968, UT was one of the first universities in the country to offer the federally funded program sponsored by the National Collegiate Athletic Association.

After federal funding for the program was cut, the University has continued to operate the camp through fundraising, in-kind donations, and commitment from the University to provide some support and facilities.

“We are very fortunate that The University of Toledo continues to support the NYSP as it aligns with the University’s mission, and UT is able to provide a safe and nurturing environment for the children to have fun while learning at the same time,” said Dr. Ruthie Kucharewski, professor and chair in the School of Exercise and Rehabilitation Sciences, and NYSP administrator.

Children watched others play volleyball and waited for their turn on the court in the Health Education Building Gym.

“Our program provides structure, offers age-appropriate activities, and it promotes a healthy lifestyle and a constructive use of leisure time. We also encourage the children to study hard in school, associate with positive people, find good adult role models, and to make good choices.”

To give a gift to the National Youth Sports Program Fund, contact the UT Foundation at 419.530.7730 or go to give2ut.utoledo.edu and search for NYSP.