UT News » Advancement

UT News

Categories

Search News

Archives

Resources

Advancement

Rockets to host evening at Inverness with football coach May 30

UT Head Football Coach Jason Candle and his staff will host a reception at the world-famous Inverness Club in Toledo Wednesday, May 30, from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m.

Fans and supporters of the Rockets can sample craft beer and wine tasting, hors d’oeuvres and a cash bar.

There will be a live auction; items will include a trip for two to the games at Fresno State; NFL packages and gifts; Rocket items; and a complete game-day experience with the team for home games vs. Miami (Fla.) and Bowling Green.

Proceeds will benefit The University of Toledo Rocket Fuel Program.

Donation levels are $1,000 for a table (seating for 10 and event recognition), $200 for a couple, and $125 for an individual. Donations are tax-deductible, except for $30 per person to cover costs.

Register here or by emailing andrew.terwilliger@utoledo.edu or calling 614.580.9978.

Tourniquets added to AED boxes for campus safety

The University of Toledo is updating a number of its automated external defibrillator stations to also include tourniquets for the campus community to be better prepared to respond to emergency situations.

While AEDs — portable devices used to treat sudden cardiac arrest — have been available for several years across UT campuses, this is the first time commercial-grade tourniquets also will be available in several AED stations.

Dr. Paul Rega, right, talked to UT Police Chief Jeff Newton as he placed tourniquets in the automated external defibrillator station outside Doermann Theatre.
On May 10, signage was installed marking the AED/tourniquet station in University Hall and 19 other such stations located across UT campuses.

“Thanks to the generosity of the UT Foundation, we were able to purchase 100 combat application tourniquets, as well as signage to help individuals locate these combined AED/tourniquet stations during an emergency,” said Dr. Paul Rega, assistant professor of public health and emergency medicine.

“In the event there is a victim or multiple victims who have sustained life-threatening hemorrhaging due to an accidental or intentional incident, tourniquets would be readily available in AED boxes to help save lives,” explained Rega, who also is the University’s medical advisor for disaster preparedness and has more than 30 years of experience in emergency preparedness. “Additionally, we’ve trained about 600 members of our campus community on how to effectively use them.”

As emergency preparedness has evolved in the U.S. during recent years, paramedics and other medical professionals have turned to using military-grade tourniquets to help save lives during disasters such as building explosions caused by gas leaks, vehicular accidents, crimes involving weapons, and other life-threatening emergencies. As a result, some large facilities such as airports, malls and schools have begun equipping their sites with such tourniquets so they are on hand for medical crises, Rega said.

“Even with a solid emergency preparedness plan, routine practices and preparation, a disaster can occur at any time,” Rega said. “That’s why it’s important that the University has proper supplies that are easily accessible across our campuses, in addition to an adequate number of campus members trained to use them.”

Whimsical, funky pieces featured in UT’s Outdoor Sculpture Exhibition

A fire seemingly blazes on the hill west of University Hall. A plucky musical instrument stands outside the Center for Performing Arts. And a 1,500-pound yellow creature soon will lumber near the entrance of UT Medical Center.

Cynthia McKean’s “Fire VI,” Michael Magnotta’s “Rodney’s Bass” and John Parker’s “Ornythopterus” are three of the 10 new works being installed for The University of Toledo’s 13th annual Outdoor Sculpture Exhibition.

“Rodney’s Bass” by Michael Magnotta is located outside the Center for Performing Arts.

“Inspiration for my work comes from my life — my experiences and things I love: jazz, space, nature and beauty in all its manifestations,” Magnotta said. “My sculptures typically begin with a trip to the metal yard. From the shapes and textures I rescue, a conversation takes place — a visual conversation — that results in the three-dimensional work composing my sculptures.”

“Outdoor sculptures have to function in a comprehensive way as a drive-by experience, as strong and dynamic silhouettes,” Parker said. “With further exploration for the passer-by, a deeper appreciation and enjoyment can be explored walking around, under and through the pieces.

“Art is not an instant snapshot. It is meant to be lived with and experienced,” he said.

Like perennials, the artwork comes to life each spring on campus.

“This is such a gorgeous time of year when nature puts on a show. The sculptures add another dimension to that beauty — a pop of color here, movement there,” said Dr. Steve LeBlanc, executive associate dean of fiscal affairs in the Office of the Provost and chair of the Campus Beautification Committee.

“Homage to Matisse” by Mike Sohikian sits near the sidewalk between University Hall and the Memorial Field House.

Two of the new eye-catching works are by Mike Sohikian. “Homage to Matisse” features four steel figures in various positions of repose along the sidewalk between University Hall and the Memorial Field House. And located on the east side of the Health and Human Services Building, “Dance of Bliss” shows motion and strength.

Another steel piece, “Poetry” by Maureen Gray, is appropriately placed in Carlson Library’s new plaza. Matt Amante’s “Elevated Intersection” adds an elegant dash of blue to Ravin Plaza on Centennial Mall.

“Stainless Steel IV” by David Vande Vusse gleams near the sidewalk on the north side of University and Gillham halls. Charles Pilkey’s “Paleozoic Landscape” consists of painted steel and river pebbles; it will rest on the west side of Centennial Mall.

And Ray Katz’s aluminum work aptly named “Burst” is located between Nitschke and Palmer halls near the traffic circle.

Nearly 170 artists submitted proposals to the Midwest Sculpture Initiative, and the UT Campus Beautification Committee reviewed the entries and selected pieces for this year’s exhibition.

Cynthia McKean’s “Fire VI” roars on the hill west of University Hall.

Artists receive stipends for the sculptures, which will be on display for the next year.

More than 120 sculptures have rotated through the display at the University since the exhibit began, and 11 have become part of UT’s art collection thanks to the generosity of campus benefactors, colleges and departments, according to LeBlanc.

“Gifts from donors make the annual exhibition possible,” he said. “If you like the sculptures, please consider a gift to the Campus Beautification Committee through the UT Foundation.”

Go to https://give2ut.utoledo.edu.

UT partners with Ohio’s public universities in efforts to close attainment gap

The University of Toledo is partnering with Ohio’s 13 other public universities to raise awareness of the value of public higher education and spur efforts to produce more college graduates to close the state’s higher education attainment gap.

The statewide campaign, called Forward Ohio, seeks to mobilize public support for enhanced investment in public higher education and ensure that it is a public policy imperative for state government.

“We know that higher education is a smart investment for the college graduate who will earn $1 million more than a high school graduate over the course of a lifetime,” UT President Sharon L. Gaber said. “It also is a smart investment for the state because Ohio needs a highly skilled workforce to attract and retain the jobs of the future. Public universities like The University of Toledo play an important role in training the majority of those skilled workers.”

Studies indicate that about 66 percent of jobs in Ohio in 2025 will require degree, certificate or other postsecondary workforce credentials. Currently, just 44 percent of working age Ohioans have these credentials.

The Forward Ohio campaign illustrates how maintaining a strong system of public higher education is essential to closing the attainment gap and meeting the economic and workforce needs of the state’s business community.

In addition to producing the workforce of the future, public universities also have direct economic impacts on their communities. In northwest Ohio, UT is the region’s second largest employer and has a $3.3 billion annual impact on the community. For every $1 invested by the state into UT, $10 of economic impact is generated to the local economy.

UT also is an exceptional value for students providing a high-quality education with one of the lowest tuition rates among Ohio’s public universities.

The value of a UT degree has been validated by external sources such as Schools.com, which ranked UT Ohio’s best four-year college when analyzing criteria such as affordability, flexibility and student services. The website LendEDU also ranked UT the top Ohio public college for the lowest student debt. Most recently, Student Loan Hero listed Toledo third in its list of the 20 cheapest cities in the country for college students, a ranking based on cost-of-living data in college towns where students benefit from low room and board costs on and off campus.

“UT and all of Ohio’s public universities provide significant value to our students and to the state,” Gaber said. “I join my fellow university presidents in advocating for enhanced support for strong public higher education to move Ohio forward.”

Visit the Forward Ohio website at forwardohio.org for more detailed facts, figures and success stories.

New genetic analysis center at UT to accelerate research in disease prevention, detection and treatment

The University of Toledo Women & Philanthropy Genetic Analysis Instrumentation Center will be unveiled Thursday, May 17, at 6 p.m. with a ceremony in Health Education Building Room 100 on Health Science Campus, followed by tours of the facility located on the second floor.

The center, which increases the capability of UT researchers in the College of Medicine and Life Sciences to develop preventative, diagnostic and treatment strategies for diseases such as cancer and heart disease, was created with the help of nearly $60,000 from Women & Philanthropy, the largest grant ever awarded by the volunteer organization that supports UT initiatives.

A researcher works in the Women & Philanthropy Genetic Analysis Instrumentation Center.

“This is a critical investment that advances the research mission of UT,” said Marcy McMahon, chair of Women & Philanthropy. “We believe it will serve to improve public health and retain and attract talented scientists dedicated to curing diseases.”

“The center truly transforms work in the emerging field of molecular diagnostics,” said Dr. David Kennedy, assistant professor in the Department of Medicine and co-director of the UT Women & Philanthropy Genetic Analysis Instrumentation Center. “By saving valuable time and using a high-quality process, it sets new standards for molecular testing and incorporates all workflow steps from sample preparation to genetic marker detection.”

“We are extremely grateful for the significant investment provided by Women & Philanthropy to establish the center, which will greatly enhance our capability to investigate numerous diseases and develop potential therapies,” said Dr. Steven Haller, assistant professor in the Department of Medicine and co-director of the new center with Kennedy.

The researchers recently received three grants totaling $450,000 from the Ohio Department of Higher Education to support their water quality research into how exposure to algal toxins, such as microcystin, affects organ function and to create new therapies to prevent and treat organ damage, especially in vulnerable patient populations.

“Although scientists in UT’s Department of Medicine are involved in many cutting-edge research projects vital to human health areas, they lacked the ability to process and examine multiple human and experimental samples for genetic analysis without significant delay,” McMahon said. “The Genetic Analysis Center meets that need.”

The UT Women & Philanthropy Genetic Analysis Instrumentation Center also received more than $45,000 in support from Qiagen, a biomedical company headquartered in Germany, to help pay for instruments, including:

• The Qiagen TissueLyser II, a tissue processor that allows up to 192 biological samples to be processed at the same time;

• The QIACube HT, a DNA-, RNA- and protein-extraction system that uses nucleic acid to quickly and easily purify DNA, RNA, protein and miRNA from almost any type of sample, including cells, tissues and food, as well as from bacteria and viruses in animal samples;

• The QIAgility, an automated liquid handling system that provides rapid, high-precision setup for polymerase chain reaction, a technique used to amplify, or make many copies of, a segment of DNA; and

• Real-time multiplex polymerase chain reaction thermal cyclers that use a centrifugal rotary design to allow each reaction tube to spin in a chamber of moving air, which keeps all samples at each step of the cycling program at exactly the same temperature. The system contains integrated Q-Rex software for data integration and analysis.

Broadway star to perform at Ryan White Program fundraiser for HIV care

Tony Award-wining star Jennifer Holliday, an original Broadway cast member of “DreamGirls,” will be the special guest during an evening of dining and music to support local HIV/AIDS patients.

“SweetDreams” will be presented by The University of Toledo Medical Center’s Ryan White Program. The event will take place Saturday, May 12, at the Radisson Hotel on Health Science Campus.

Funds raised at the event will go to the Ann Wayson Locher Memorial Fund for HIV Care, which supports HIV care for adults and children in the Toledo area.

Wayson Locher opened the first grant-funded free and anonymous HIV testing site in northwest Ohio in 1985 and was one of the key organizers for The University of Toledo’s Ryan White Program. The memorial fund was developed in her honor upon her death in 2010.

“Ann was passionate about providing support to those affected by HIV and AIDS,” said Richard Meeker, manager of community engagement for the Ryan White Program. “The memorial fund provides services for HIV and AIDS patients who have needs that cannot be covered by other agencies or programs in our community. Many individuals are living on a fixed income and need a little help when emergencies arise. That’s where we come in.”

The evening will include cocktails, Southern-style buffet dinner, jazz vocals by Toledo’s own Ramona Collins, and a program presentation on mental health challenges.

Holliday will give the keynote address and perform at the event. She is an advocate for mental health, HIV and LGBTQ rights.

Having struggled with depression herself, Holliday now shares her story of overcoming depression and stresses the importance of seeking medical treatment as the key to a successful recovery.

Holliday is an ardent philanthropist who uses her performances to bring hope to people in search of healing, as well as to raise funds and bring awareness to various causes that impact millions of people every day.

Tickets for the “SweetDreams” fundraiser are $150 each.

The Ryan White Program also is seeking sponsorships with opportunities that range from $1,000 to $5,000 and include VIP tickets for the meet-and-greet reception with Holliday and recognition at the event.

For more information or to purchase tickets, visit tinyurl.com/sweetdreams2018.

President asks Toledo to share its Rocket pride during address

In her second state of the University address, UT President Sharon L. Gaber shared accomplishments that are building a positive momentum on campus and encouraged the Toledo community to uplift its university by showing its Rocket pride.

“We have so many great programs, exceptional faculty, talented clinicians and accomplished students. We need to celebrate that!” Gaber said. “We need to talk about ourselves as a destination university. We need to tell each other and everyone we meet that this is a fantastic place where students can earn an excellent education in a safe and supportive environment.”

President Sharon L. Gaber addressed more than 400 people who attended her second state of the University address.

More than 400 students, faculty, staff and community members attended the speech April 18 in the Thompson Student Union Auditorium. Each attendee received a UT window cling to take with them to share their Rocket pride on their vehicle or in their office or home.

Gaber focused much of her talk on the initiatives underway to support student success, enhance research excellence, and strengthen UT’s reputation.

The president highlighted a number of programs adopted to support students, such as lowering the cost of a UT education through the Tuition Guarantee program that locks in the cost of tuition and some general fees for four years and a digital course content program that offers less expensive digital texts to students.

The $6 million investment in Carlson Library that was completed in the summer has led to a 40 percent increase in student visits this school year, she said, before announcing another enhancement to the library coming in the fall — a new Starbucks on the second floor.

Gaber recognized a number of researchers for their contributions to advancing knowledge, including undergraduate physics student Nathan Szymanski, who was recently awarded the prestigious Goldwater Scholarship for his studies of solar cell and battery technologies.

Overall, UT’s research program has doubled the number of awards received so far this year compared to the year before. UT has received 233 research awards and nearly $41 million in external research funding, Gaber announced.

“We are proud of the national accolades bestowed this year on our talented researchers and faculty members for advancing knowledge,” she said.

The president did note that the University has been able to maintain financial stability thanks to a number of successful initiatives last year, but asked every individual at UT to continue efforts to recruit and retain more students because enrollment growth is key to achieving UT’s goals.

Building up fundraising efforts also is important for UT’s success. The president publicly announced for the first time how the University plans to use the real estate gift from Welltower, which is UT’s largest gift in history valued at $30 million. UT’s Division of Advancement will relocate to the Welltower property to allow all of its offices — Alumni and Annual Engagement, Development, Special Events, the UT Foundation, and University Marketing and Communications — to work together under one roof.

Gaber’s speech about UT’s accomplishments and the talent of its students, faculty and staff led to a call to action for the audience — and the broader Toledo community — to help tell the University’s story and strengthen its reputation by showing their Rocket pride.

“UT is this city’s only university. We have an important impact on this community, and we need your support,” Gaber said. “We want you to share our enthusiasm. Mentor our students. See our physicians. Partner with us. Root for our Rockets. And hire our graduates.

“We are energized by our positive momentum. And we are so proud to be The University of Toledo.”

Watch the address here.

University Women’s Commission honors employees, gives scholarships to students

Three UT employees were recognized for exceptional achievement and dedication to the campus community at the 32nd annual Outstanding Women’s Award ceremony.

More than 60 attended the University Women’s Commission program, which was held April 11 in the Savage Arena Joe Grogan Room.

Kelly Andrews, senior associate athletic director who is chair of the University Women’s Commission, told the crowd that since 1987, the organization has honored 173 UT faculty and staff members, and awarded $87,000 in scholarships.

Guest speaker Sherry Stanfa-Stanley, director of foundation and development communications with the UT Foundation, talked about how challenging yourself to go outside your comfort zone can be empowering. The 1983 UT alumna and 2017 Alice H. Skeens Outstanding Woman Award winner is the author of “Finding My Badass Self: A Year of Truths and Dares,” which just received a silver medal in the humor category of the 2018 Independent Publisher Book Awards (IPPYs).

Recipients of the 2018 Dr. Alice H. Skeens Outstanding Woman Award were, from left, Melissa Gleckler, Dr. Revathy Kumar and Dr. Michele Soliz.

The recipients of the Dr. Alice H. Skeens Outstanding Woman Award were:

• Melissa Gleckler, educational technologist with UT Online in University College. She has worked at the University for 11 years. Gleckler won the Ohio Academic Advising Association Excellence Award in 2017, and has presented about advising and learning assessment at national conferences. She is a founding member of the Toledo Academic Advising Association, and she is serving a three-year elected term as co-chair of the communications committee for the Professional Staff Council. The UT alumna received a bachelor of arts degree in communication in 1996, a master of liberal studies degree in 2009, and is working on a PhD.

“She had a wonderful rapport with her students. Her office was next door to mine, and the walls were quite thin. I could hear laughter, sometimes tears and consolation, and lots of encouragement,” one nominator wrote. “Melissa is a proud UT alumna. I have always admired her pursuit of self-improvement and further education. She continuously sought opportunities to add a credential or skill and is pursuing a PhD focused on educational media and technology, with research interests in how course aesthetics and technical design affect the learning experience. As an adjunct instructor, she took pride in enhancing her courses with the latest technology and was passionate about updating the content and course material every semester.”

• Dr. Revathy Kumar, professor of educational psychology in the Judith Herb College of Education. She joined the UT faculty in 2001. Her research focuses on social and cultural processes involved in constructing a sense of self and identity among adolescents in culturally diverse societies. Of particular interest are the roles of teachers, teacher-education programs, schools, communities and families in facilitating minority and immigrant adolescents’ development, learning and motivation. Her work has been published in education and psychology journals.

“Dr. Kumar has started examining the role of mindfulness cultivation among pre-service teachers for enhancing awareness and focusing attention on personal implicit and explicit biases toward poor and minority students. The program of research is both important and relevant because increasing demographic heterogeneity in our country has raised concerns regarding our teachers’ capacity to face the challenging task of teaching culturally diverse students,” one nominator wrote. “She has chosen to develop a line of research particularly aimed at improving undergraduate teacher education at UT and, as responses to her articles indicate, recognized as useful across the nation for constructing teacher education programs that prepare teachers to be effective in the diverse classrooms they will enter.”

• Dr. Michele Soliz, assistant vice president for student success and inclusion in the Division of Student Affairs. During her 17 years at the University, she has worked in the Office of the Provost and served as dean of students. She was chair of the 2017 UT Community Charitable Campaign, which raised $128,934 for nearly 220 nonprofit area organizations. The UT alumna received a master of education degree and a PhD in higher education in 2002 and 2012, respectively.

“Michele has an unbridled passion for helping the students she comes into contact with on campus, as well as those in the community. Her determination and wholehearted desire to help others was apparent to me since the first time we worked together,” one nominator wrote. “She has been a committee member of the Latino Youth Summit and Multicultural Emerging Scholars Program since their inceptions. She is active in the UT Latino Alumni Affiliate, serves as a mentor to African-American female students in the Talented and Aspiring Women Leaders Program, and teaches the course Managing Diversity in the Workplace. Her hours of charitable work confirm she is not only socially conscious, but also invested in the betterment of the world around her.”

Winners of the University Women’s Commission $1,000 scholarship were, from left, Celine Schreidah, Jessica Avery, Shaquira Jackson and Hailey Cox.

The University Women’s Commission also presented $1,000 scholarships to four students. Receiving awards based on academic achievement, support of women’s and gender issues, and campus involvement were Jessica Avery, a senior majoring in history; Hailey Cox, a junior majoring in biology; Shaquira Jackson, a junior majoring in theatre; and Celine Schreidah, a senior majoring in biochemistry.

Two successful engineering alumni named national trustees

Two successful graduates of The University of Toledo will join the UT Board of Trustees as national members.

Roy V. Armes, a 1975 mechanical engineering graduate of the UT College of Engineering who served as president and CEO of Cooper Tire & Rubber Co. in Findlay, and Birdel F. Jackson III, who graduated from UT in 1968 with a civil engineering degree and founded the B&E Jackson and Associates engineering and consulting firm in Atlanta, will join the UT Board of Trustees effective July 2. Their appointment was approved Monday.

UT established national trustees last year to take advantage of the diverse cultural, geographic, business, professional, public service and civic backgrounds, talents and experiences of friends and alumni of the University. Toledo native and award-winning journalist Christine Brennan was named the first national member. National trustees serve a two-year term without voting privileges.

Armes

“Roy and Birdel are among UT’s most distinguished alumni who are highly respected leaders in their professions,” Board Chair Steven Cavanaugh said. “The perspectives from these accomplished graduates will be invaluable as we make progress on our strategic priorities.”

Armes led Cooper Tire for a decade. He was appointed CEO and president in 2006 and chairman in 2007. He retired in 2016.

Armes’ career also included a variety of roles for the Whirlpool Corp. in the areas of engineering, manufacturing, global procurement and international operations management. He served as corporate vice president and general director of Whirlpool Mexico, vice president of manufacturing technology for Whirlpool Asia, and vice president of manufacturing technology-refrigeration products for Whirlpool Europe.

Armes and his wife, Marcia, were instrumental in establishing the Engineering Leadership Institute in UT’s College of Engineering to help undergraduate engineering students develop leadership skills. The Armes have provided generous support to The University of Toledo.

Jackson

Jackson established B&E Jackson and Associates in 1988 and grew the company into a respected professional consulting firm serving the transportation, aviation and civil engineering industries.

Jackson began his career in the bridge divisions for U.S. Steel in Pittsburgh and the District of Columbia Highway Department. He went on to work for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, General Electric, and engineering and architecture firms. He spent much of his career in Atlanta and is a registered professional engineer in Georgia and 13 other states.

Jackson is the president of the Jackson-Davis Foundation, which he established to award scholarships in honor of his grandparents and to make the engineering profession more diverse and inclusive. He has served his alma mater as past president of the UT Alumni Association and University of Toledo Foundation board. Jackson also has been recognized with the UT Alumni Association’s Gold T and Blue T awards.

UT president to deliver state of the University address April 18

President Sharon L. Gaber will share The University of Toledo’s positive momentum during her second state of the University address.

The speech will be Wednesday, April 18, at 3 p.m. in the Thompson Student Union Auditorium, followed by a reception. University students, faculty, staff, alumni and the public are invited to attend.

“We have so much to be proud of at UT, and I want each person in Toledo to celebrate the excellent University they have in their community,” Gaber said. “This annual event is an opportunity to reflect on our accomplishments and look forward to the future.”

The successes of UT students, faculty and staff, and the impact those achievements have on the broader Toledo region, are something everyone can rally around, Gaber said.

This will be Gaber’s second state of the University address since being named president in July 2015.