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Women & Philanthropy awards two grants to College of Medicine

Women & Philanthropy, a volunteer organization that promotes The University of Toledo through grants to UT initiatives, has given 2018 grants in the amount of $69,348.44.

The first grant for $63,400 was awarded to the College of Medicine and Life Sciences to create the Women & Philanthropy Thrombosis and Hemostasis Research Center. This grant will address a significant gap in the University’s ability to assess thrombosis in human patient and rodent samples.

Scientists in the college are focusing on diseases that have significant mortality due to thrombotic complications and in projects surrounding cancer-induced thrombosis.

“The ability to find reliable diagnostic tests or markers that will accurately characterize the risk of developing a clot is vital,” Marcy McMahon, chair of Women & Philanthropy, said. “While the scientists can do certain assays associated with assessing clotting, they do not have the necessary equipment to perform platelet aggregometry and complete blood counts.”

The new equipment will have broad-ranging applications from autoimmune to metabolic disease. Investigators in multiple departments will be able to highlight the Thrombosis and Hemostasis Research Center in grant applications to organizations such as the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation to help secure more research funding for investigators and The University of Toledo.

The second grant for $5,948.44 also went to the College of Medicine and Life Sciences to provide for photoscreening of infants and children at well-care visits.

The Spot Vision Screener to be utilized requires minimal patient cooperation, bypassing traditional screening methods. It will allow infants and toddlers to be screened, along with older children with significant developmental disabilities.

“This screening is important in order to reduce the risk of amblyopia, a condition that causes permanent vision impairment but is preventable if vision problems are recognized early,” McMahon said.

Women & Philanthropy at The University of Toledo was chartered in 2006 and made its first award to UT in 2008. Through this giving circle, members of diverse backgrounds and interests work collaboratively to make positive, meaningful and immediate impacts at the University.

Women & Philanthropy has given a total of 19 grants totaling $493,687.44 to The University of Toledo during the past 10 years.

Applications for 2019 grants will be available in late fall.

Additional information about Women & Philanthropy is available at
utfoundation.org/give/women-philanthropy.

Art on the Mall to return to campus July 29

Art on the Mall will take over UT’s Centennial Mall Sunday, July 29, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

This summer marks the free, public event’s 26th year of showcasing a variety of art on Main Campus. Attendees will have the opportunity to view all kinds of art, including acrylic, glass, jewelry, mixed media, photography, pottery and more.

“We welcome and encourage everyone to attend one of northwest Ohio’s signature art shows,” said Ansley Abrams-Frederick, director of alumni programming in the UT Office of Alumni and Annual Engagement. “It’s a great way to spend a summer day — looking at amazing artwork on our beautiful campus.”

A total of 115 artists will have artwork for sale by cash, or guests can pay using a credit card at the artist’s booth or credit card station located in the Thompson Student Union.

Representatives from the Ft. Wayne Museum of Art will jury the works with prizes being awarded to the top artists. UT’s Best of Show award will be given to an artist with an affiliation to the University; students, faculty, staff, retirees, alumni and parents are eligible for this honor.

Throughout the event, guests can listen to live jazz with performances from UT student and alumni groups Minor Frett and the Twenty TwentyFour.

Food and beverages will be for sale throughout the day from vendors that will include Big C’s Smoked Barbeque, Karen Anne’s Kettle Corn, Opa! Gyros, Java Sensations/Let’s Go Nuts, Quinn’s Concessions, Jeanie’s Comfort Cuisine, Snowie Daze, the Petite Fleet, and K & K Concessions.

A beer and wine garden will be at Art on the Mall and offer a selection of adult beverages for guests 21 and older with a valid ID. This year the show will feature three varieties of craft beer from one of the area’s newest establishments, Patron Saints Brewery on Bancroft Street.

In addition, faculty and students from UT’s Ceramics Program in the Department of Art will demonstrate their skills in front of the Thompson Student Union and give guests the chance to “throw a pot.” The UT art students also will have a booth with their work available for sale.

And an area for young artists will allow children to create their own masterpieces.

Free parking for the event will be available in lot 1 south, lot 1 north and lot 13 with a golf cart shuttle service to transport guests and their purchases to and from Centennial Mall if needed.

Art on the Mall is supported by community sponsors 13abc, The Andersons Inc., The Blade, the Toledo-Lucas County Port Authority, Mail It, The University of Toledo Federal Credit Union and 101.5 The River.

For more information on Art on the Mall, contact Abrams-Frederick at 419.530.4316 or ansley.abrams@utoledo.edu.

Tradition continues: National Youth Sports Program brings kids to campus

Fun and learning — that’s what the National Youth Sports Program (NYSP) is all about.

A total of 140 income-eligible children came to campus last month for the free three-week program that provides recreational and educational opportunities.

Braylin Elam, a student at St. Francis di Sales High School, jumped in the pool at the Student Recreation Center.

Along with sports programs, the students learned about nutrition, enhancing their self-image, the value of communication, healthy behaviors, and how to resist peer pressure.

Starting in 1968, UT was one of the first universities in the country to offer the federally funded program sponsored by the National Collegiate Athletic Association.

After federal funding for the program was cut, the University has continued to operate the camp through fundraising, in-kind donations, and commitment from the University to provide some support and facilities.

“We are very fortunate that The University of Toledo continues to support the NYSP as it aligns with the University’s mission, and UT is able to provide a safe and nurturing environment for the children to have fun while learning at the same time,” said Dr. Ruthie Kucharewski, professor and chair in the School of Exercise and Rehabilitation Sciences, and NYSP administrator.

Children watched others play volleyball and waited for their turn on the court in the Health Education Building Gym.

“Our program provides structure, offers age-appropriate activities, and it promotes a healthy lifestyle and a constructive use of leisure time. We also encourage the children to study hard in school, associate with positive people, find good adult role models, and to make good choices.”

To give a gift to the National Youth Sports Program Fund, contact the UT Foundation at 419.530.7730 or go to give2ut.utoledo.edu and search for NYSP.

Baseball program to host annual golf outing Aug. 3

The Toledo baseball program will hold its annual golf outing Friday, Aug. 3, at the Legacy Golf Club in Ottawa Lake, Mich.

Registration for the event will begin at 10:30 a.m. with a shotgun start scheduled for 11:30 a.m.

The day will include free access to the driving range, as well as lunch and a post-golf dinner in the clubhouse.

Hole sponsorships are $100 and available to any individual, family, business, etc.

The deadline to register for the golf outing is Monday, July 30.

To RSVP, or for any questions, contact the baseball office at 419.530.6263.

Rockets to host ‘Football 101 — Ladies’ Night Out’ July 26

UT Football Coach Jason Candle and his wife, Nicole, will host “Football 101 — Ladies’ Night Out” Thursday, July 26, from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Glass Bowl.

The event will be a night of football, food and fun, and include the opportunity to get a behind-the-scenes tour of the Larimer Athletic Complex.

Those in attendance will have the opportunity to hear the coaches discuss the upcoming season, try on the team’s Nike uniforms, meet the coaches and their wives, and sit in on a team meeting.

A wine and cheese social will be held during the event, and participants will receive a Rocket football T-shirt.

Tickets for the event are $100.

All proceeds from the event will benefit the Human Trafficking and Social Justice Institute at The University of Toledo.

To register, fans can go online to UTRockets.com, call 419.530.4653, or visit the UT Athletic Ticket Office. The deadline to register is Friday, July 20.

Former men’s basketball team manager passes away

Former UT Basketball Manager Bobby Graney of Dunedin, Fla., died June 30. He was 58.

Graney served as head ball boy for the men’s basketball team from 1979 to 2000, and could always be found in his seat at the end of the scorer’s table next to the Rocket bench at every home basketball game. He also worked with the football and women’s basketball teams.

Graney

In the late 1980s, Graney increased his duties and began attending every UT men’s and women’s basketball practice where he would run the scoreboard and the clock. He also helped out in the equipment room.

In 2000, Graney, who had Down syndrome, retired with his family to Florida, where the climate was better suited to his condition.

He was inducted into The University of Toledo Varsity ‘T’ Hall of Fame in 2000.

“All of us who knew and worked with Bobby came to love him,” said UT Deputy Athletic Director Dave Nottke, who worked with Graney during his time as a basketball manager in the 1990s. “He was a fixture at UT basketball games and practices. The UT Athletic Department extends its deepest sympathies to Bobby’s family during this difficult time.”

Graney is survived by parents, Bonnie and Mike; brother, Tim (June); sister, Michelle (Andrew); brother, Chris; nephews, Zach (Sarah) and Brandon; and niece, Emily.

Services will be private. The family gives special thanks to all their friends who knew Bobby, to the UT basketball staff, coaches, players, and everyone who made his life normal and complete.

Memorials are suggested to the UT Foundation for the basketball program.

Women & Philanthropy raising funds to purchase books for Toledo Public Schools

Women & Philanthropy at The University of Toledo is partnering with the Judith Herb College of Education to help provide books to 40 second-grade classrooms in the Toledo Public Schools.

Last year, the organization’s Holiday Project raised enough funds to donate 1,000 books to 33 second-grade classrooms in 19 of the 40 TPS elementary schools.

Second-graders at Old Orchard Elementary School checked out some of the books donated to Toledo Public Schools by UT’s Women & Philanthropy and the Judith Herb College of Education. The books were distributed to 33 second-grade classrooms at 19 TPS schools March 15 during a ceremony at Old Orchard Elementary.

Women & Philanthropy is getting an early start on this year’s project and is accepting donations through Tuesday, July 31.

With the help of donations from the community, Women & Philanthropy hopes to provide $200 worth of books to the second-grade classrooms in the remaining 21 TPS elementary schools before the academic year starts.

In order to do so, $8,000 in donations will be needed.

The Holiday Project is also accepting good-as-new used children’s books at second- and third-grade reading levels.

To make a donation to the cause, checks can be made payable to the UT Foundation with “2018 W&P Holiday Project” in the memo line and sent to:

Sarah Metzger
UT Foundation
Driscoll Alumni Center, MS 301
2800 W. Bancroft St.
Toledo OH 43606

New or gently used books may be dropped off to Metzger in Driscoll Alumni Center Room 2014A.

President’s contract extended through 2023

In a strong show of support for The University of Toledo President Sharon L. Gaber’s leadership, the UT Board of Trustees approved Monday an amended contract to continue her presidency for the next five years.

The term of the amended contract is from July 1, 2018, through June 30, 2023. Her original contract was set to expire in June 2020.

Gaber

“Dr. Gaber’s leadership has put UT on a positive trajectory toward the ambitious goal of being a top public research university, and the campus is energized because of the great work underway to support our students and the Toledo community,” Board Chair Steven Cavanaugh said.

The amended and restated employment agreement updates the president’s base salary and includes specific performance metrics aligned with the University’s strategic plan. The president’s overall compensation is directly tied to achievement of the metrics.

The contract extension for Gaber was approved as part of the Board of Trustees’ annual review of the University’s leader in which they praised the positive momentum of the institution.

“I am thankful to have the support of the Board of Trustees to continue to lead this fantastic university,” Gaber said. “It truly is a team effort to work together collaboratively to make progress on achieving our strategic priorities. I am proud of what we’ve been able to accomplish these past three years, and I’m excited about what we can achieve in the years ahead.”

The board commended Gaber’s commitment to student success, noting that student retention rates at UT are the highest in at least 18 years, and the largest number of candidates for degrees in at least 20 years participated in spring commencement.

The new Toledo Tuition Guarantee was recognized as a positive initiative to provide more transparency to students and their families. In addition, UT was recognized this year for its value by several external sources. Schools.com ranked UT Ohio’s best four-year college when analyzing criteria such as affordability, flexibility and student services. The website LendEDU also ranked UT the top Ohio public college for the lowest student debt.

The trustees specifically noted the improved research portfolio of the institution. The total number of research award dollars is at a five-year high. The board noted that three researchers were named Fellows of the prestigious American Association for the Advancement of Sciences, and several UT students were awarded highly competitive scholarships, including the Goldwater Scholarship and a Sarnoff Fellowship.

Also enhancing UT’s reputation is the strong athletics program with two new Mid-American Conference Championships by the football and women’s soccer teams. UT was awarded the Jacoby Trophy as the top women’s athletic program in the MAC and, in the fall, all student-athletes achieved a record high combined GPA of 3.29.

Individually, Gaber was named one of the top five higher education leaders to watch. She was appointed to the NCAA Strategic Planning Committee and the Inter-University Council Executive Committee, and serves on the MAC Finance Committee, of which she will be the chair next year.

This year the University also received the largest gift in UT’s history from Welltower, which gave UT real estate and a headquarter building valued at $30 million. It will serve as an additional campus where the Division of Advancement will continue to build relationships with alumni and donors. The number of donors to the institution grew by more than 10 percent this year.

The increase in philanthropic support and additional initiatives have put UT in a strong financial position, confirmed by the University’s bond rating being reaffirmed by Standard & Poor’s and Moody’s. UT approved this year a new contract with the American Association of University Professors, one of five bargaining agreements approved in the last two years. A new transportation partnership with TARTA will save the University approximately $2 million by not replacing the aging bus fleet while extending free bus rides to students, faculty and staff throughout the community.

As part of the performance review, the board voted to give the president a performance incentive per her hiring contract. The funding comes from unrestricted funds that were generated from investment earnings and allocated to a Board of Trustees account with the UT Foundation.

UT recognizes areas of research excellence

The University of Toledo has identified three areas of research excellence as it pursues its goal of achieving national recognition for contributions to advancing knowledge.

UT’s current areas of research excellence identified by the University Research Council and endorsed by external reviews are:

• Astronomy and Astrophysics;

• Solar Energy, Water Quality and Sustainable Technologies; and

• Cell Architecture and Dynamics.

“These areas emerged from a yearlong review process and were selected because of the highly accomplished faculty members UT has in these areas who are recognized nationally for contributions to their fields of study,” Vice President for Research Frank Calzonetti said. “Identifying these areas of excellence will help promote the University’s standing as a strong research university and create opportunities for collaboration.”

This will be a continual process with ongoing invitations to consider new areas and to update existing areas of excellence, Calzonetti said.

UT astronomers have produced groundbreaking discoveries in the origins of stars and star clusters. They have access to highly competitive time on the world’s best telescopes, including NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope and the European Space Agency’s Herschel Space Observatory. UT also is a partner with Lowell Observatory, which provides guaranteed access to the Discovery Channel Telescope in Arizona. The University regularly engages undergraduate and graduate students in research projects with that telescope.

The strength of the University’s astronomy and astrophysics program was recognized nationally in 2016 when UT was selected to join the prestigious Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, which includes many of the country’s top programs.

Solar energy, water quality, and sustainable technologies were identified in part due to the University’s strong reputation in research, development, and commercialization of thin-film photovoltaic technologies. For example, in solar energy, Dr. Yanfa Yan, Ohio Research Scholar chair and UT professor of physics, has one of the strongest publication records among researchers in his field.

The UT Lake Erie Center receives attention for its work studying harmful algal blooms in Lake Erie and its efforts to protect the quality of the region’s drinking water. Additional faculty members are making important contributions to green chemistry and other sustainability studies.

The cell architecture and dynamics category recognizes the basic science researchers involved in the study of the cell and its structures to better understand cell movement and how that affects disease progression. For example, Dr. Rafael Garcia-Mata, associate professor of biological sciences, has three active National Institutes of Health grants to study the migration of cancer cells away from the primary tumor and their subsequent metastasis to distant organs.

The identification of these areas of research excellence and a plan to advance them is part of the University’s strategic plan. As part of the process to identify existing strong research programs, the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs also recognized spotlight areas of unique distinction, areas of emerging research excellence, and areas of future opportunity.

The spotlight areas of unique distinction include programs that have received national recognition with strong faculty leadership, but with few faculty experts on campus currently advancing that field of study. Those spotlight areas identified are:

• Human Trafficking, led by Social Work Professor Celia Williamson and supported by the UT Human Trafficking and Social Justice Institute;

• Disability and Society, which includes Professor Kim E. Nielson, who is the author of the only book to cover the entirety of American disability history titled “A Disability History of the United States.” UT also offers the only humanities-based undergraduate degree in disabilities studies; and

• Hypertension and Precision Medicine, led by Distinguished University Professor Bina Joe, a recognized leader in the field of genetic determinants of high blood pressure.

Identified areas of emerging research excellence are those with growth opportunities based upon the significance of their work to science and society. The areas that could benefit from further development are:

• Legacy Cities, which includes a collaborative group of faculty members across the social sciences who study how former industrial cities that experienced massive decline are being reinvented, and

• Cancer, Immune Therapy and Precision Molecular Therapy, which features advances in targeting specific genes or proteins for more effective and less invasive treatment options.

Lastly, areas of future opportunity were identified where a group of faculty members are working in an area of emerging importance in science, technology and society. The areas that could gain recognition through focused investment are:

• Vector Biology, which studies mosquitos and other insects that transmit diseases and affect public health;

• Smart Transportation, which includes advances in autonomous vehicles;

• Data 2 Decision, which is the study of big data and how it is used, analyzed and protected;

• BioPsychoSocial Determinants of Chronic Disease, which studies the economic and social conditions that impact health factors, such as the work underway by UT’s opioid task force; and

• Community-Based STEAM, which features community partnerships, such as with the Toledo Museum of Art, that advance the arts and promote continued education. STEAM is an acronym for science, technology, engineering, art and math.

“The University of Toledo has strong research programs across the institution,” said Jack Schultz, senior executive director for research development. “Our goal with this process was to identify those areas with a high level of recognition at the national level. We look forward to exploring opportunities to elevate their standing and bring more attention to these areas of research excellence.”

The identification of the University’s focus areas does not imply that research without these designations will be unsupported. The University values all faculty research and the contributions each faculty member makes in their fields.

Trustees approve 2019 operating budget

The UT Board of Trustees approved on June 18 the University’s operating budget for fiscal year 2019 that includes the new Tuition Guarantee plan for incoming students and no tuition increase for continuing undergraduate students.

The $750 million operating budget is based on stable student enrollment and reflects efforts the University has taken to control costs, such as savings from last year’s Voluntary Separation Incentive Program and health-care savings generated by encouraging employees to use UT’s pharmacies.

The new Tuition Guarantee goes into effect for the 2018-19 academic year and allows new degree-seeking undergraduate students to pay the same tuition and general fees from their first day of college through graduation four years later. On-campus housing and meal plan rates also are guaranteed for four years; however, residence hall space cannot be guaranteed beyond a student’s second year due to high demand from first- and second-year students.

An undergraduate tuition freeze continues for the fourth consecutive year for students enrolled prior to summer 2018 who are not included in the Tuition Guarantee program. The budget includes a 2 percent increase in the graduate tuition rate, with additional increases in some specific graduate programs. The trustees previously approved a 2 percent increase in housing and meal plans to cover increasing costs of operations.

The budget reflects wage increases for professional staff and faculty members who are not part of a bargaining unit. The increases are based on salary levels in which individuals with a salary greater than $100,000 will receive a 1 percent wage increase; employees who make between $75,000 and $100,000 will receive a 1.5 percent raise; and those who make less than $75,000 will receive a 3 percent wage increase. University employees who are members of unions will receive increased compensation as determined by their collective bargaining agreements.

The Board of Trustees elected officers for the 2018-19 year. Mary Ellen Pisanelli will serve as chair, and Alfred A. Baker will serve as vice chair.

The June meeting completed the board service of Joseph H. Zerbey, former president and general manager for The Blade, who was appointed to the board in 2009. Lucas D. Zastrow, a student trustee in the Doctor of Physical Therapy Program, also was recognized for his two years of service to the board.