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Researchers assess role schools can play in preventing, responding to teen dating violence

A nationwide study of school principals has shown that while the majority had assisted a victim of teen dating violence recently, most of them had never received formal training in this area and their school did not have a specific protocol for dealing with the issue.

The most common approaches of school principals for responding to teen dating violence found are discussed in an article published in Violence and Gender, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert Inc. publishers.

“Teen dating violence is, unfortunately, a child and adolescent social and health problem,” Dr. Amy Thompson, professor of public health at The University of Toledo, said. “Even if minor, victims of teen dating violence can suffer from major consequences, including depression or suicidal tendencies.

“This study surveyed school administrators in an effort to help inform better practices and policymaking on dealing with this dangerous issue.”

The article titled “Preventing and Responding to Teen Dating Violence: A National Study of School Principals’ Perspectives and Practices” was co-authored by Thompson; Dr. Jagdish Khubchandani, associate professor of health science at Ball State University, who received a doctorate in health education from UT in 2010; and colleagues from Illinois State University, the University of Houston, the Indiana Area Health Education Center, and the Illinois Education Association.

The researchers provide data related to teen dating violence prevention practices by schools, training to assist victims provided to personnel within the past two years, and the most common ways principals assisted victims of teen dating violence.

“Our No. 1 goal is to help school administrators prevent teen dating violence,” Thompson said. “We also want to help school leaders establish policies for teen dating violence and helping victims.”

“This article is truly an eye-opener. According to the authors, teen dating violence has emerged as a ‘significant child and adolescent social and health problem,’ but school administrators and staff are not equipped to address it,” said Dr. Mary Ellen O’Toole, editor-in-chief of Violence and Gender, and director of the Forensic Sciences Program at George Mason University.

“More training is absolutely essential to address this problem effectively,” O’Toole said. “This first of its kind national study will help principals, teachers and others realize their own deficiencies and develop proper procedures to address an issue that affects our children and adolescents in every school throughout the country.”

UT Dancing Rockettes to compete at nationals this weekend

Seventeen University of Toledo students will leap, kick and plié as the Dancing Rockettes compete in the College Cheerleading and Dance Team National Championship this weekend.

The team arrived early Thursday in Orlando, Fla., and practiced at the ESPN Wide World of Sports Complex at the Walt Disney Resort in Bay Lake.

The UT Dancing Rockettes posed for a photo last year in the Glass Bowl.

“What’s really exciting for us this year is they built a new arena specifically for cheer and dance competitions, and college nationals is the first competition they’re having at this complex,” Devon Hays, coach of the Rockettes, said.

UT qualified to hit the floor at nationals by attending a four-day camp last summer at East Tennessee State University.

“Any college or university is welcome to register to compete at nationals,” Hays said. “We are in NCAA Division 1-A, so we compete against teams from across the country that are also Division 1-A schools.”

Presented by the Universal Cheerleaders Association and Universal Dance Association, the national competition will feature jazz, hip-hop and pom dance categories. In addition, cheer and mascot contests will take place.

“Pom is what we compete; it’s a mixture of jazz dancing with cheer or pom motions,” Hays said.

Rockette Kaylee Hull executed a jump in the Glass Bowl.

The Dancing Rockettes are scheduled to perform their two-minute routine Saturday, Jan. 13, at 7:42 a.m.

“It’s the most jam-packed two minutes that you can imagine,” Hays said and laughed.

“We have a couple skills we’ve really been working on, drilling down so we nail them at competition,” she said. “We have some aerial cartwheels — that’s a no-handed cartwheel that a handful of our girls do that they’ve really been working hard on. And we have a big team turn sequence that we’ve been spending a lot of time making sure everybody is hitting their spot exactly on time.”

Hays said the Rockettes will be among some 20 teams in their Division 1-A category.

“We’re the third team to go in the prelims Saturday morning, so there’ll be a lot of teams after us that we’ll be able to watch and see our competition,” she said.

Teams will find out Saturday afternoon if they advance to the finals, which will take place Sunday.

Founded in 1961, the Rockettes were among the first recognized collegiate dance teams in the country.

“That’s a very cool piece of history we have. It’s crazy because we’ve been around so long, but we’re so new to the competition world. This is only our third year competing,” Hays said.

“I want the team to be proud of what they’re putting on the competition floor. Being on that competition floor is a chance for us to have fun and showcase everything we’ve worked really hard for this year,” she said. “We have so much talent. I want them to be proud of everything they’ve achieved. On top of that, I want them to understand they’re paving the way for the future and legacy of this program.”

In her third year as coach of the Rockettes, Hays graduated from UT in 2012 with a bachelor of business administration degree in marketing and entrepreneurship. The former UT cheerleader helps run her family’s Mini Motions Dance Center in Toledo.

“It’s been exciting for me to come back and grow the dance team,” she said.

Affiliated with the UT Rocket Marching Band, the Rockettes step it up at football games during fall semester and also perform at Mid-American Conference home basketball games in spring semester.

Freeze frame: New book offers pictorial history of UT

There are 240 photos packed into the 128 pages of “University of Toledo.”

That’s a lot of pictures telling many stories in the new book by Barbara Floyd. Part of Arcadia Publishing’s Campus History Series, the work takes a look back at The University of Toledo.

Barbara Floyd holds her new book, “University of Toledo.”

“This book would not have been possible without the incredible images preserved in university archives created by photographers known and unknown,” Floyd said. “The Ward M. Canaday Center for Special Collections houses more than 15,000 UT images, and sifting through them to decide what to include in this book was a labor of love.”

Floyd was the perfect person to curate the book. She retired last month as director of the Canaday Center, where she worked 31 years, initially as university archivist and later also as director of special collections for 20 years.

And she is a UT alumna. She received a bachelor of arts degree in journalism, a master of arts degree in American history, and a master’s degree in public administration from the University.

“The University of Toledo changed my life,” Floyd said. “Having the chance to pay tribute to this beloved institution that means so much to so many was a wonderful opportunity.”

The pictorial review starts with one man who had a vision: Jesup W. Scott believed Toledo could be the “Future Great City of the World.”

“As a real estate investor, Jesup Scott saw the location of Toledo on railroad lines, on the Great Lakes, and near farmland as the elements of a future industrial powerhouse,” Floyd said. “And that future great city would need a university.”

Scott donated 160 acres of land to serve as an endowment for the Toledo University of Arts and Trade. While the school failed, it was resurrected in 1884 by Scott’s sons, who gave the remaining assets to the city to create a manual training school.

“By 1909, the institution was becoming a full-fledged university, but struggled financially and needed a permanent location,” Floyd said.

When Dr. Henry J. Doermann became president of the University in 1928, he began planning for a new campus. A $2.8 million bond levy was passed that November, less than one year before the Great Depression.

A photo shows Doermann at the 1929 groundbreaking ceremony for University Hall.

“President Doermann selected the Collegiate Gothic design elements of the great universities of Europe because he wanted the architecture to inspire students,” Floyd said.

University Hall with its iconic tower and dual courtyards continues to be one of the most photographed landmarks in Toledo.

Images chronicle the University’s growing campus and burgeoning student life, which flourished even more when UT joined Ohio’s higher education system in 1967.

“The focus of this book is on the major events that shaped the University,” Floyd said. “It celebrates the University’s growth as an institution.”

There was a lot to celebrate in 2006 when UT merged with the Medical University of Ohio. At the time, it was estimated the new entity would have a $1.1 billion impact on Ohio’s economy.

A few pages also commemorate when UT was in the national spotlight. A smiling Chuck Ealey, the quarterback known as the “Wizard of Oohs and Aahs” who led the Rockets to a 35-0 record from 1969 to 1972, is in the book, along with a shot of the men’s basketball team playing Indiana in the inaugural game in Centennial Hall, now called Savage Arena. UT won, 59-57, with a basket at the buzzer to end the Hoosiers’ 33-game winning streak. And the women’s basketball team is shown celebrating its 2011 WNIT Championship.

Floyd gave credit to the late longtime UT photographer Bill Hartough, MCO photographer Jack Meade, and current University photographer Daniel Miller: “Their keen eyes captured events big and small, as well as campus life.”

“University of Toledo” is $21.99 and available at the Barnes & Noble University Bookstore and online book retailers.

Dollar General Bowl watch party Dec. 23

Fans who can’t make the trip to Mobile, Ala., to see the Toledo Rockets play the Appalachian State Mountaineers in the Dollar General Bowl Saturday, Dec. 23, are invited to a watch party.

The University College Alumni Affiliate will host the event at Bar 145, 5305 Monroe St. in Toledo.

Wear your blue and gold and come cheer on the Rockets!

Meet at 6:30 p.m. before the game starts at 7 p.m.

All food and drink costs will be billed individually during the watch party.

Reservations are appreciated, but not required. Click here.

Fewer toys lead to richer play experiences, UT researchers find

Any parent knows how toys seem to magically multiply and take over a house. Do children need so many toys?

A team of University of Toledo researchers studied whether the number of toys in a toddler’s environment influenced their quality of play. Their findings: Less is definitely more when it comes to creative, healthy play.

Research by Dr. Carly Dauch, left, and Dr. Alexia Metz found less is definitely more when it comes to toys and toddlers’ creative, healthy play.

The results of the study come just in time for family and friends who are picking up holiday gifts for the children in their lives. The research, which will appear in the February issue of Infant Behavior and Development, suggests that an abundance of toys may create a distraction. Fewer new toys might be a better route this holiday season.

When toddlers had exposure to fewer toys, they played twice as long with the toys they had and in more sophisticated ways, said Dr. Alexia Metz, the study’s lead investigator and a UT associate professor of occupational therapy.

As the mother of 12-year-old twins, Metz has personal experience with the proliferation of toys phenomenon.

“I was astonished by how much our home filled up with stuff,” she said. “I wondered whether there was any risk to having that much stuff.”

Metz said she also had observed people worrying whether their toddlers had attention deficit disorder. Toddlers, by nature, are distractible, but she wondered whether their environment might be a factor in how they played or how easily distracted they were.

Metz and her team of graduate students studied 36 toddlers from 18 to 30 months of age. The children visited the playroom lab twice. On one visit, the children played in a room with just four toys; on the other, they had access to 16 toys.

The team charted how many times the toddler picked up a toy; how long they played with it; and how many ways they played with it.

“When there were fewer toys, they played with them in more ways,” Metz said.

In the 16-toy environment, many of the children played with 10 or more toys in the 15 minutes soon after they entered the room. By flitting from toy to toy, they didn’t take the time to explore the ways they could use each toy, Metz said.

Fewer toys led to “higher quality play,” meaning the toddler stuck with the toy for longer and played with it in more creative ways. Instead of stacking or tipping a toy, they began to hammer with it or feed it or hide it. This increased exploration may support development of motor and cognitive skills.

“Today there is the demand to have the latest and greatest toy that encourages a more technological mind. In this study, we used older toys that encouraged more creative play and tested the theory of is less really more?” said Dr. Carly Dauch, who graduated from UT in May following the completion of the study and is now an occupational therapist at the Wood County Board of Developmental Disabilities. “How the children played supported our hypothesis and provides support for deeper and richer play with fewer toys.”

Michelle Imwalle and Brooke Ocasio, who also graduated in May, were the other graduate students involved in the project.

The bottom line for parents: “If your child receives an abundance of toys, you don’t need to introduce them all at once,” Metz said. “Save some for later and swap them out. If they have a chance to explore a few toys at a time, they might have a richer experience.”

This is also good news for families who may feel guilty for not being able to shower their children with dozens of toys.

“They’re not depriving their children of an opportunity for meaningful play,” Metz said. “This is a less is more story.”

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist to deliver UT commencement address Dec. 17

Toledo native and Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Michael D. Sallah will return to his alma mater Sunday, Dec. 17, to deliver the keynote address during The University of Toledo’s fall commencement ceremony.

The event will begin at 10 a.m. in Savage Arena.

Sallah

Sallah will address 2,067 candidates for degrees, including 118 doctoral, 523 master’s, 1,370 bachelor’s and 56 associate’s.

The ceremony is open to the public and can be viewed live at video.utoledo.edu.

Sallah’s investigative work as a reporter and editor with award-winning newspapers across the country has revealed public corruption, police abuses and government blunders, resulting in grand jury investigations, legislative reform, and the recovery of millions of taxpayer dollars.

He is a reporter on the national investigations team at USA Today/Gannett Network in Washington, D.C.

“This is where it all began for me,” Sallah said. “From the time I took my first journalism class in the fall of my freshman year, I fell in love with journalism, and UT is a big part of that. It’s part of my foundation — the professors, the values they conveyed to me about journalism, and why it’s so critical to our society, especially investigative work. I’m honored to be coming home to be the commencement speaker.”

“Journalists have an important role to inform the public about the issues that affect our lives, and Michael Sallah has embraced that responsibility uncovering many misdeeds through investigative reporting that resulted in positive change,” UT President Sharon L. Gaber said. “I look forward to him sharing with our graduates how he got his start here in Toledo and inspiring them to stay curious and serve their communities.”

Born in Toledo, Sallah is a 1977 alumnus of The University of Toledo, graduating cum laude with a bachelor of arts degree in journalism. He was named UT’s Outstanding Alumnus in the Social Sciences in 2004. Sallah also is a 1973 graduate of St. John’s Jesuit High School.

He was a reporter and national affairs writer at The Blade for more than a decade, and was the lead reporter on the 2003 project “Buried Secrets, Brutal Truths” that exposed the U.S. Army’s longest war crimes case of the Vietnam War. The series won numerous national awards, including the 2004 Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting.

While investigations editor and reporter at the Miami Herald, Sallah led an inquiry into local corruption. His team’s 2006 “House of Lies” series exposed widespread fraud in Miami-Dade County public housing and earned the 2007 Pulitzer Prize for Local Reporting. He was named a 2012 Pulitzer Prize finalist for his series “Neglected to Death,” which uncovered deadly conditions in Florida assisted-living facilities, led to the closing of 13 facilities, and was the impetus for a gubernatorial task force to overhaul state law.

During his two years at The Washington Post, Sallah received a Robert F. Kennedy Award for Excellence in Journalism for an investigation that exposed a predatory system of tax collection in the District of Columbia. 

He returned to the Miami Herald in 2014 and was named a Pulitzer Prize finalist in 2016 for uncovering one of the nation’s most corrupt sting operations in a police unit that laundered $71.5 million for drug cartels, kept millions for brokering the deals, and failed to make a single significant arrest. 

Sallah is the author of the books “Tiger Force: A True Story of Men and War” and “Yankee Comandante: The Untold Story of Courage, Passion and One American’s Fight to Liberate Cuba.” He also was a consultant for the Public Broadcasting Service documentary “American Experience.”

UT’s fall commencement ceremony will recognize graduates from the colleges of Arts and Letters; Business and Innovation; Judith Herb College of Education; Engineering; Graduate Studies; Health and Human Services; Honors College; Natural Sciences and Mathematics; Nursing; and Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences; and University College.

For more information, visit utoledo.edu/commencement.

UT Alumni Association offers trip, party for Dollar General Bowl

See you at the Dollar General Bowl! The UT Alumni Association has organized a charter plane trip so fans can watch the Rockets play the Appalachian State Mountaineers Saturday, Dec. 23, at 6 p.m. Central time at Ladd-Peebles Stadium in Mobile, Ala.

The charter flight will leave Friday, Dec. 22, at approximately 7:30 a.m. from the Toledo Express Airport and return immediately after the game Sunday, Dec. 24, around 4 a.m.

The package includes:

• Round-trip charter air travel.

• A ticket to the mayor’s luncheon featuring Bob Stoops, college football coaching legend at the University of Oklahoma.

• The world-famous Mardi Gras parade and pep rally.

• A meal and tour of GulfQuest, National Maritime Museum of the Gulf of Mexico.

• UT Alumni Association pre-game party with a menu that will feature fried shrimp; catfish and chicken tenders; hush puppies; fried green tomatoes; Cajun seafood gumbo; peeled shrimp; red beans and rice with sausage; Creole coleslaw; marinated corn and tomato salad; cookies; brownies; sweet tea; and lemonade. A cash bar will be available. UT President Sharon L. Gaber, the UT Rocket Marching Band and UT cheerleaders will be at this event.

• Ticket to watch the bowl game.

• Overnight accommodations at the Battle House Renaissance Mobile Hotel & Spa in Mobile, Ala.

• A Dollar General Bowl hoodie, exclusive to travelers on the charter.

• All shuttles and gratuities.

The package cost, based on double occupancy, is $1,200 per person. The cost for a single is $1,300. Those who already have tickets to the game may deduct $45 per ticket.

There are 70 seats available on a first-come, first-served basis. Click here for more information and to register.

The deadline to register for the charter trip is Tuesday, Dec. 19.

Alumni and fans who are traveling on their own to the game can attend the pre-game party for $35; registration is required. Click here. The cost for fans who need a ticket and would like to attend the pre-game party is $80 per person.

Reservations for the pre-game party only — not including a game ticket — will be accepted until 5 p.m. Friday, Dec. 22.

Fans who want tickets to the bowl game can call 419.530.GOLD (4653) or click here.

For more information, call the UT Alumni Office at 419.530.2586 or 800.235.6766.

UT quarterback’s journey one for the record books

When Logan Woodside first arrived on the campus of The University of Toledo, he figured he would have to be patient. With senior Terrance Owens calling the signals and Alabama transfer Phillip Ely waiting in the wings, Woodside assumed he would be redshirted, and possibly wait in the wings for another year after that before he had his chance to become a starter.

He was wrong. But then he was right.

Logan Woodside has the most passing yards of any UT quarterback: 10,083 going into this weekend’s MAC Championship Game.

Nearly five years down the line, Woodside’s career didn’t go exactly as he planned. But as he and the Rockets (10-2, 7-1 Mid-American Conference) prepare to play in the 2017 MAC Championship Game vs. Akron Saturday, he wouldn’t change a thing.

“It’s been the best five years of my life,” said Woodside, who graduated last spring and his working on his master’s degree. “I’ve met some of my best friends here. When you’re a freshman, you want time to move fast. When you’re a fifth-year senior, it’s like, where’d all the time go?”

Rocket fans are probably wishing time would stand still and Woodside could be their quarterback forever. He has set virtually every Toledo passing record in the books, including the most passing yards in a season (4,129 in 2016) and in a career (10,083 going into Saturday’s MAC Championship Game), most touchdown passes in a season (45 in 2016) and career (89), and many others. He has led Toledo to 28 victories as the starting quarterback, second only to the legendary Chuck Ealey’s 35 wins from 1969 1971.

But the numbers hardly tell Woodside’s story.

Woodside did not redshirt as a freshman — that came later. Injuries to Owens in 2013 forced him into the lineup for four games. A year later, Ely won the starting position, but an early-season injury put Woodside in the lineup. Under Woodside’s leadership, UT went 9-4 with a bowl victory. Only a 27-24 loss at Northern Illinois kept the Rockets out of the MAC Championship Game.

Everything seemed to be going Woodside’s way. Until it wasn’t.

The following season, Ely beat him out for the starting position for the second straight time, leading Toledo to a 10-2 season. Woodside sat out the entire season, using the redshirt year he thought would come in his freshman season. He has called that season the most difficult of his life.

“Being told that I wasn’t good enough for the second straight year was difficult,” Woodside said. “But it motivated me and made me become a better player. I’m grateful now for the opportunity to have the extra year. I believed in my coaches, and I knew they would put me in the best situation possible. I trusted in them, and it all worked out.”

Since Woodside took over as the starter last year, it is hard to argue that there has ever been a more prolific passer to wear the Midnight Blue and Gold. He was named Mid-American Conference Offensive Player of the Year and the Vern Smith Leadership Award winner this season. The Vern Smith Leadership Award, named for the former Toledo athletic director, has been given annually to the league’s most outstanding player since 1982. Woodside is the fourth Rocket to win the award. This is his second consecutive season as a first-team All-MAC quarterback, the first Rocket QB to accomplish back-to-back first-team honors since Gene Swick, who was a three-time first-teamer from 1973 to 1975.

In addition, Woodside has been named a contender for the Heisman Trophy in each of the past two seasons.

It wasn’t the typical college football hero’s journey, true, but Woodside certainly made it a memorable one. And now, as the curtain is about to close on one of the all-time great Rockets, there is little doubt that Woodside has left his mark on the program.

“I hope people will remember the legacy I’ve left here,” Woodside said. “I gave it everything I had. I left it all out on the field.”

Alumni Office plans MAC Championship pregame party, bus trip

Make plans to join The University of Toledo Alumni Association for a bus trip to the Mid-American Conference Championship Game to cheer on the Rockets when they battle the University of Akron Saturday, Dec. 2.

Seven buses have been reserved to transport alumni, students and fans to the game and pregame party in the Comerica Gridiron Club at Ford Field. Transportation includes the cost of parking, driver tip, soft drinks and bottled water.

The menu for the pregame party is:

• Zingerman’s Bake House breakfast pastries, including lemon clouds, scones and cinnamon rolls;

• Bagels with cream cheese;

• Fresh seasonal fruits;

• Roasted vegetable egg frittata with mushrooms, onions, cauliflower, spinach, seasonal squash and goat cheese with fresh herbs;

• French toast casserole with bananas Foster filling, cream cheese and pecan pieces served with warm maple syrup on the side;

• Griddled breakfast meats, including Detroit Sausage Co. breakfast links;

• Coffee, hot tea and fresh orange juice; and

• A cash bar will be available.

Buses will depart from Rocket Hall at 7:30 a.m. with the pregame party scheduled from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m., prior to the kickoff at noon. Buses are expected to return at approximately 6 p.m.

Because the Alumni Association is contractually bound for bus rental, facility rental and catering charges, There will be no refunds for cancellations.

Options available:

• Pregame party only — $35 per person for those who have their tickets and plan to travel to Detroit on their own.

• Complete package — $95 per person for game ticket, bus trip, and pregame party at Ford Field.

• Bus trip and pregame party only (no game ticket) — $75 per person for athletic donors/season ticket holders who wish to purchase their seats through the Athletic Department.

• Pregame party and game ticket only — $55 per person for those who plan to travel to Detroit on their own.

Bus space is available on a first-come, first-served basis. A total of 350 seats are available. The pregame meal is limited to the first 600 reservations, which includes the 350 bus seats. Game tickets will be $20 seats in Ford Field.

The deadline to make reservations for the bus trip is Thursday, Nov. 30, or until all seats are filled.

Complete, non-refundable payment must be received with your reservation. Pregame party reservations will be accepted until room capacity is reached.

Register here.

A special bus trip and ticket package for UT students will be available Monday, Nov. 27, at noon. A link to that website will be posted when it is available.

Tickets for the MAC Championship Game may be ordered online at utrockets.com or call the UT Athletic Ticket Office at 419.530.GOLD (4653).

Orders placed before 5 p.m. Tuesday will receive priority seating. Rocket Fund contributors and Rocket Football season ticket holders will receive priority-seating locations over the general public. Any orders placed after 5 p.m. Tuesday will receive best available seating.

UT doctoral student receives 20 Under 40 Leadership Award

Jeremy Holloway, who is pursuing a doctorate in curriculum and instruction in the Judith Herb College of Education, recently was recognized for his contributions to the community.

He was honored as one of this year’s recipients of the 20 Under 40 Leadership Award.

Jeremy Holloway, a UT alumnus and doctoral student, smiled after receiving a 20 Under 40 Leadership Award.

The award is presented annually to 20 individuals who are 39 or younger in the Toledo community who have demonstrated exceptional leadership qualities.

“I am so proud to receive this award and so proud to represent The University of Toledo,” Holloway said.

He is a man in motion. Holloway is a mentor for undergraduate students through the University’s Brothers on the Rise, which helps UT males, especially African-American and Latino, make the transition from high school and college. He also is involved with UT’s Multicultural Emerging Scholars Program, represents the Judith Herb College of Education in the Graduate Student Association, and is a leader for the Kappa Delta Pi Honor Society in Education.

In addition, he is a mentor with Big Brothers Big Sisters.

“It gives back when you give back,” Holloway said. “You make deposits to your character account when you pay it forward. [Being involved] also helps me realize that we are all together, and we all really need each other to make a difference.”

The native of Toledo also is finishing his doctoral degree. He has been invited to speak on his dissertation research at conferences in Ohio and Pennsylvania, as well as Austria.

“I try to take things one task at a time and believe I work better when my schedule is fairly full,” he said. “I think the key for me is to prioritize.”

He packs a lot into his days. As a graduate assistant in the Judith Herb College of Education, he coordinates professional development for the High Schools That Work and Northwest Ohio Tech Prep programs, and teaches workshops for area teachers and administrators. Holloway also tutors local students.

In 2005, he received a bachelor of arts degree in Spanish and a bachelor of education degree from UT. He taught Spanish at area schools and graduated from the University in 2014 with a master’s degree in English as a second language.

Holloway is grateful to his father, Tyrone Holloway Sr., who graduated from UT with a bachelor’s degree in business administration with an administration personnel major in 1971.

“After my dad graduated from The University of Toledo, he was unable to find a job, so he returned to UT and worked as a janitor for years,” he said.

Tyrone Holloway worked as a custodian from 1985 to 1994, when he took a job in the UT Registration Office. He retired from the University in 1994.

“Later I realized my dad stayed and worked as a janitor so that I could attend the University when I grew up,” Holloway said. “I decided to take him up on that offer.

“The University of Toledo is a place of legacy for me. I am honored to be here.”