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Former Ohio Supreme Court Justice donates papers to UT

Former Ohio Supreme Court Justice and Toledo native Judith Ann Lanzinger recently donated her personal papers to the Ward M. Canaday Center for Special Collections at The University of Toledo.

Lanzinger, who is the only person ever elected to all four levels of Ohio’s judiciary, retired from the state’s highest court in 2016.

Former Ohio Supreme Court Justice and UT law alumna Judith Ann Lanzinger, second from left, recently donated her personal papers to the Ward M. Canaday Center for Special Collections. She posed for a photo with, from left, Lauren White, manuscripts librarian and lecturer; D. Benjamin Barros, dean of the College of Law; and Barbara Floyd, director of the Canaday Center and interim director of University Libraries, who propped up a 2007 portrait of justices from the Supreme Court of Ohio.

During her long career, she also served on the 6th District Court of Appeals, the Lucas County Court of Common Pleas and the Toledo Municipal Court.

The Canaday Center, the special collections department of the UT Libraries, has long collected manuscript materials related to the history of women in northwest Ohio. Noteworthy collections include the papers of educators, politicians and activists such as Linda Furney, Betty Mauk, Betty Morais, Mary Boyle Burns, Ella P. Stewart and Olive Colton. The center recently has begun collaborating with the College of Law to preserve the history of Toledo’s women lawyers and judges.

“We are delighted to help ensure this important history is accessible to future scholars and citizens,” said D. Benjamin Barros, dean of the College of Law.

As part of this collaboration with the College of Law, the center also recently acquired a collection of scrapbooks documenting the career of Geraldine Macelwane, the first woman elected judge of the Toledo Municipal Court (appointed in 1952) and the first woman judge of the Lucas County Common Pleas Court (appointed in 1956). She died in 1974.

“Justice Lanzinger is one of our most distinguished alumni, having notably served at all levels of the Ohio judiciary. We are honored that the University is able to house her papers, which we hope will encourage and inspire others to civic engagement,” Barros said.

The Lanzinger collection contains photographs, awards and research files documenting her judicial career. Of particular note are the former justice’s case notes that provide insight into her thoughts and opinions as they developed during trials.

“This collection will provide a rich source of information on many aspects of Justice Lanzinger’s career,” said Barbara Floyd, director of the Canaday Center and interim director of University Libraries. “We hope to continue to collect and preserve the papers of other women lawyers and judges from this area to add to these collections.”

Lanzinger said, “I am honored that the Ward M. Canaday Center has accepted these documents that represent my 31 years of service at all levels of Ohio’s judiciary. I hope they may be of help in future academic projects at The University of Toledo, my alma mater.”

For more information on the collection, contact Floyd at 419.530.2170.

Rocket fans: Psych up for MAC Tournament

See you at the Mid-American Conference Tournament! The UT Alumni Association will host pre-game events in Cleveland before the women’s and men’s contests this week.

Pre-game parties will begin two hours prior to tipoff at Harry Buffalo, 2120 E. 4th St., Cleveland, just across the street from Quicken Loans Arena.

The women’s team will play Wednesday, March 8, at 7:30 p.m., and the Alumni Association pregame party at Harry Buffalo will begin at 5:30 p.m. 

The men’s team will hit the hardwood Thursday, March 9, at 6:30 p.m., and the Alumni Association pregame party at Harry Buffalo will begin at 4:30 p.m.

Admission to each pregame event is $15 per person. Reservations are appreciated but are not required, and walk-ins are welcome.

The all-you-can-eat menu for Wednesday, March 8, will include chicken tenders, beef sliders with cheddar cheese, sheet pizzas, chicken salad, croissant sandwiches and a house salad. Soft drinks and iced tea are included with the meal, and a cash bar will be available. 

The menu for Thursday, March 9, will include buffalo chicken egg rolls, fried ravioli, barbecue pulled pork sliders, sheet pizzas and a house salad.

To register, contact The University of Toledo Office of Alumni Relations at 419.530.2853 or 800.235.6766, or click here.

Reception set for longtime employee

Campus community members are invited to a retirement celebration for Chris Spengler Monday, Feb. 27, from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. in the Driscoll Alumni Center Schmakel Room.

Spengler began her career at the University in the Personnel Department in 1977. After serving as secretary for the Geology Department, she became executive secretary in the Office of the President and assistant secretary to the UT Board of Trustees. She assisted three presidents — Dr. Glen Driscoll, Dr. James McComas and Dr. Frank Horton — and one interim president, John Stoepler. 

Spengler

In 1999, she transferred to the Division of Advancement, where she is director of advancement relations.

“We have been fortunate to have Chris as an important member of our UT family for so many years,” said Brenda S. Lee, president of the UT Foundation. “Her contributions to the Advancement team, as well as the entire University community, are very much appreciated. She will be missed.”

What’s it been like to work at UT for 40 years?

“Every day has been fun — great people and a great place to work,” Spengler said. “The University is so vibrant; there is something new to learn each day. I also have greatly enjoyed working with individuals who have shaped the University into what it is today. I have a favorite hard hat from my days in the President’s Office that has my name on it along with a little saying: ‘I’m in charge of the one in charge.’”

In that power position for 20 years, Spengler has lots of stories; she joked that she knows where the bodies are buried: “I even got my hands dirty. I helped bury Dr. Horton’s dog on the grounds of the former president’s house. He was out of town, and the burying crew was me, Carol Crum, the housekeeper, and George Stamos, the chef.”

During the last four decades, Spengler has left her mark on the University. She founded the Presidential Ambassadors, the honorary organization where select students serve the Office of the President by fostering good relations between the student body and alumni, faculty, staff and donors by representing and promoting UT at various events. And in 2006, she played an integral role in the establishment of UT’s Women & Philanthropy; she developed the bylaws for the collaborative effort of area women and the University’s Division of Advancement. Since then, Spengler has served as administrative contact for the community of female philanthropists who support the mission and goals of the University.

Last year, Spengler and her husband, William, donated $100,000 to the women’s basketball program. The couple gave the funds to the UT Foundation to create a charitable gift annuity. The Spenglers have a long affiliation with Rocket athletics.

“You will continue to see me at all home football and basketball games cheering on our Rockets,” Spengler said.

No surprise Spengler is true to her school: She received an associate of applied business degree from UT’s former Community and Technical College and a master of education degree from the University.

That dedication also will continue: “I haven’t spent much time contemplating what I will miss because I plan on remaining a very active retiree and alumna,” she said. “I’m going to be around a lot.”

Spring Engineering Career Expo set for Feb. 22

More than 140 companies will have representatives at the UT Spring Engineering Career Expo Wednesday, Feb. 22, from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. in the College of Engineering Complex.

“Our employer participants include companies such as American Electric Power, Cooper Tire and Rubber, Dana, DTE Energy, DePuy Synthes/Johnson & Johnson, Fiat Chrysler, First Energy, Ford Motor Co., GE, Honda, Marathon, Nationwide, Norfolk Southern, Owens Corning, Owens-Illinois, Zimmer Biomet and many more,” said Dr. Vickie Kuntz, director of the Engineering Career Development Center.

Approximately 600 engineering students, graduates and alumni are expected to attend the expo.

“The current job outlook for engineering students in the UT Engineering College is certainly bright as evidenced by the record number of employers registered to attend the college’s spring career expo,” Kuntz said. “This reflects very positively on the quality of both our programs and our students. It also demonstrates our dynamic and mutually beneficial partnership we have with our industry participants.” 

Employers are seeking undergraduate students to participate in engineering co-op assignments, as well as leadership development programs. Employers also are seeking seniors and graduates for full-time employment. 

The UT College of Engineering undergraduate mandatory co-op program is one of only eight mandatory engineering co-op programs in the country. 

“Many students indicate our co-op program is the reason they attend the UT College of Engineering,” Kuntz said. “Our program requires our students to graduate with one full year of professional engineering experience. Our students feel confident seeking full-time employment upon graduation. Co-op employers are able to work with these students and are able to determine how the student fits within their organizations. It’s a win-win situation for our students and the employers who hire them.”

For more information, go to eng.utoledo.edu/coop/career_expo or contact Kuntz at vickie.kuntz@utoledo.edu

Wanted: Outstanding Teacher Award nominations

Take a few minutes and recognize that teacher, the one who inspired you, challenged you, encouraged you, and motivated you to be your best.

Nominations are being accepted for the Outstanding Teacher Award through Sunday, Feb. 26, at midnight.

This will be the 42nd year the University and the UT Alumni Association will recognize faculty members for their outstanding dedication to teaching.

All full-time faculty members who have not received the award in the past are eligible for this honor.

Up to six winners will be chosen by a group of past recipients and a Student Government representative, and all committee deliberations and the content of nominations remain confidential.

Recipients will receive a cash award of $1,500 and recognition by the University, the UT Alumni Association and President Sharon L. Gaber.

Nominations should include specific examples that demonstrate the nominee’s ability as an outstanding teacher as the supporting statements in the nomination weigh heavily during the evaluation.

“The faculty at UT are hardworking and should be recognized for the time they invest to help their students learn the skills to succeed after graduation,” said Amanda Schwartz, associate director of UT alumni relations.

To place a nomination, click here. A list of past winners is available here.

Winners will be recognized at the UT Outstanding Awards Reception Monday, April 17, at 5:30 p.m. in the Thompson Student Union Ingman Room.

For more information, contact Schwartz at amanda.schwartz@utoledo.edu.

Speaker to discuss the value of promises Feb. 16

The day Alex Sheen buried his father, he also started an international movement.

Then a 25-year-old working in corporate software, Sheen was asked by his family to eulogize his father, UT alumnus Wei Min “Al” Sheen, a pharmacist who passed away in September 2012.

Sheen

Calling Al Sheen an “average man who was exceptional at one thing,” Sheen, of Lakewood, Ohio, said his father was someone who kept his promises. “Too often, we say things like ‘I’ll get to it’ and ‘tomorrow,’” Sheen noted in an excerpt from his website, becauseIsaidIwould.com. “One day, there is no tomorrow. The promises we make and keep and those we choose to dishonor define us and this world.”

That day in 2012, he handed out the first of his promise cards, nondescript pieces of paper that remind people of the value of commitment.

Sheen will have plenty of promise cards during his public lecture Thursday, Feb. 16, in Doermann Theater. During the free, public event, the final of the 2016-17 Jesup Scott Honors College Distinguished Lecture Series, Sheen will discuss the importance of accountability and the effect of a simple kept promise in today’s society.

“Because I said I would” will begin at 7 p.m.

Sheen said handing out the first promise cards “set off a chain of events to the scope of which I may never understand.”

The purpose of the cards is simple; house a written promise as a tangible reminder to fulfill a pledge. Since 2012, becauseIsaidIwould has distributed more than 5.6 million promise cards to people in 153 countries.

Some of the promises, Sheen said, are small: “Keep my room clean” and “Sincerely compliment someone every day.” Others have the capability to enact change and even save lives.

A woman donated a kidney to an acquaintance. A teenage girl testified against her attacker. A man with terminal cancer left daily “napkin” notes for his daughter so she would have comfort after his death. On YouTube, another man confessed, “I killed a man,” explaining he was the drunk driver whose actions resulted in the death of a stranger. The accused’s promise? “I will take full responsibility for what I have done.” While the man is in prison, the video he made with Sheen has been viewed by millions and has spurred thousands of promise cards from people pledging not to drink and drive.

Sheen practices what he preaches. His own list of promises is current, visible and ranges from the innocuous — “Watch ‘Gone With the Wind’” — to the exceptional. He has walked 240 miles across Ohio to support victims of sexual violence, spent 24 hours picking up trash in the Cleveland area, provided 24 hours of free rides for those who have been drinking, and raised enough funds to send 20 cancer-stricken children to Walt Disney World, all on the spark of a promise.

“Alex’s work is the perfect antidote to our busy lives, during which we forget to think about meeting longer term goals and commitments to ourselves and to others,” said Dr. Heidi Appel, dean of the Jesup Scott Honors College. “Turning this into a social movement was a brilliant step to help us collectively meet our promises, and provides great inspiration for would-be social entrepreneurs among our students.”

Sheen’s movement has expanded to include the development of city chapters and outreach to schools, businesses and other organizations. His message remains uncomplicated: Accountability. Character. Hope.

“Make and keep a promise,” Sheen wrote on his website, “to improve yourself, your family or your community. If you need a promise card to make the commitment real, we will send you one. The world is in need, so you are needed.”

To reserve a free ticket to the lecture, go to utoledo.edu/honorslecture.

Vice president for advancement named to lead fundraising, marketing

A fundraiser with more than 15 years of experience in higher education development has been selected to lead The University of Toledo’s Division of Advancement.

Michael Harders, vice president of university advancement and development for Kennesaw State University in Georgia, will join the University as vice president for advancement Monday, March 20.

Harders

Harders

“The work that the Division of Advancement does to elevate UT’s fundraising and messaging to our campus, alumni and external communities is important to the University’s success achieving our goals,” UT President Sharon L. Gaber said. “Mike’s experience and commitment to building a culture of philanthropy will provide strong leadership in this area, which is focused on elevating UT’s reputation.”

The Division of Advancement includes Alumni Relations, Development, Marketing and Communications, and Special Events. It was created in 2015 with the merger of UT’s Institutional Advancement Division and External Affairs Division.

“I am honored for the opportunity to work with President Gaber and The University of Toledo community to advance the vision and strategic priorities of this outstanding university at this important moment in the institution’s history,” Harders said. “It’s an exciting time at UT as it completes its strategic plan and continues efforts to grow fundraising and alumni engagement for the University.

“I look forward to collaborating with the campus community, to learning the philanthropic interests of the supporters of the institution, and to working with the talented professionals in the Division of Advancement as we strive together to support our students and faculty, and enhance our facilities and programs for the benefit of our state, nation and world.”

During his time at Kennesaw State since 2012, Harders tripled the amount of annual support to the university with significant growth in annual giving and alumni participation and donations.

He previously served as executive director of development for Missouri State University, where he coordinated its “Our Promise” comprehensive campaign, which exceeded its $125 million fundraising goal. He also was senior director of development for the Kansas State University Foundation.

Harders, who is moving to Toledo with his wife, Leigh, and children, Josephine and Henry, earned his bachelor’s degree in history and political science from Kansas State University.

UT political science scholar to speak at alumni event about presidential election

The community is invited to an event hosted by the Golden Alumni Society at The University of Toledo discussing the victory of President Donald Trump, the Electoral College and its history, and the effect of the 2016 election on the major political parties.

The Golden Alumni Society is comprised of UT alumni who graduated at least 50 years ago or who have reached the age of 75 since graduation.

The free, public program titled “The Election and the Future” features Dr. Jeffrey Broxmeyer, assistant professor in the UT Department of Political Science and Public Administration, will take place Friday, Feb. 3, at 10 a.m. in the Driscoll Alumni Center Schmakel Room. Reservations are required.

Retired Judge George Glasser is a member of the Golden Alumni Society and coordinator of the event. He graduated from UT with a bachelor of arts degree in 1951 and a law degree in 1953.

“This is the first time the Golden Alumni Society is hosting a program about an election,” Glasser said. “The subject is on everybody’s mind and stirring up a great deal of controversy and opinions. We want to serve the community by utilizing some of the fine resources we have at the University to provide information, discussion and answers to questions.”

This semester, Broxmeyer is teaching courses at the University about political parties and the presidency. His current research in American political development focuses on the wealth accumulated by party leaders during the 19th century.

“I plan to provide some historical context to the election results as well as a political science perspective on where the country is heading with the new Trump administration,” Broxmeyer said. “One of the main topics will be the development and impact of heightened political polarization on governing, political institutions and public discourse.”

A question-and-answer session will follow Broxmeyer’s presentation.

To sign up to attend the event, call the Office of Alumni Relations at 419.530.2586 or register online at toledoalumni.org.

Campus community members: Enter business innovation competition

UT students, faculty and staff who have a great business idea may win up to $10,000 to help make that idea a reality in the seventh annual business innovation competition sponsored by the College of Business and Innovation. Entries are due Monday, Feb. 27.

“The first six years of the business competition were a remarkable success as the College of Business and Innovation received dozens of entries from across UT campuses,” said Dr. Sonny Ariss, chair and professor of management. “We are expecting another tremendous array of entries this year and trust the contest will continue to advance a creative culture of growth in all areas of the University.

business-competition-poster-2017“Evidence of the extensive appeal of this annual competition is found in the fact that the first-place winner of last year’s competition was a UT music major, Mackenzie Miller, who claimed the $10,000 prize for her custom trumpet business, Miller Handcraft,” Ariss noted.

Dr. Gary Insch, dean of the College of Business and Innovation, said, “This annual business plan competition truly reflects our emphasis on supporting innovation, fostering creative thinking, and nurturing the entrepreneurial environment that is so essential for the economic growth of this region.”

“Entrepreneurship is not only for people who want to start a business,” Ariss said. “Corporate America also looks for innovative thinking from their employees, so intrapreneurship within the corporate business structure remains important. This is demonstrated by the fact that the college continues to have corporate partners — Owens-Illinois, PNC Bank and Chuck and Ann Hodge — who contribute prize money for the winners of this competition.”

Ariss said competition entries must be submitted using Lean Launch Pad concepts, which enables people to develop their business model upon nine basic building blocks: customer segments, value propositions, channels, customer relationships, revenue streams, key resources, key activities, key partnerships and cost structure.

“As we have every year, the College of Business and Innovation is again ready to offer guidance to help these teams effectively implement their plans, emerge beyond the University, create jobs, and enhance area economic growth,” Ariss added.

There is no cost to enter the competition. Registration must be completed online. Winners must prove that they have formed an LLC or S Corp in order to receive a financial award.

The College of Business and Innovation is providing the following prize money:

• First place: $10,000 (sponsored by Owens-Illinois Inc.);

• Second place: $5,000 (sponsored by Chuck and Ann Hodge Business Plan Competition Fund);

• Third place: $2,000 (sponsored by PNC Bank); and

• Honorable mention: $500 (sponsored by PNC Bank).

The timeline for the 2017 competition is:

• Those planning to enter the competition are invited to attend a workshop session Monday, Feb. 6, from noon to 1 p.m. in the Savage & Associates Business Complex PNC Entrepreneurship Lab Room 3100.

• Entries must be submitted by Monday, Feb. 27.

• Finalists will be announced Friday, March 24.

• Finalists will make an oral presentation about their business using the business model canvas Thursday, April 13, between noon and 5:30 p.m. in the Savage & Associates Business Complex PNC Entrepreneurship Lab Room 3100.

• Winners will be announced Thursday, April 20.

The competition is open to all UT students, faculty and staff, while alumni can participate as a member of a team involving current students, faculty or staff.

To register or for more information, go to utoledo.edu/business.

Ohio Department of Health director to visit campus

Richard Hodges, director of the Ohio Department of Health, will discuss 2017 public health trends he expects to see in the state during a stop at The University of Toledo this week.

Hodges

Hodges

He will speak Thursday, Jan. 26, at 11 a.m. in Health and Human Services Building Room 1711.

Hodges will talk about how the Ohio Department of Health is addressing public health crises, including infant mortality and drug overdoses, by collaborating with state, regional and local public health organizations.

While on campus, he also will visit the Jacobs Interprofessional Immersive Simulation Center and the schools of Population Health; Exercise Science and Rehabilitation Services; Social Justice; and Intervention and Wellness.

In addition, Hodges will discuss the opioid epidemic with College of Health and Human Services students.

The UT alumnus received a master of public health degree in 1991. Hodges was appointed director of the Ohio Department of Public Health by Ohio Gov. John Kasich in 2014.

For more information about Hodges’ visit, contact Angela Campbell of the College of Health and Human Services at angela.campbell@utoledo.edu
or 419.530.5399.