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Golf outing to raise scholarship funds for College of Law

Registration is open for the 18th Annual John W. Stoepler Memorial Scholarship Golf Outing, which will be held Friday, June 9.

The outing will take place at the Belmont Country Club 29601 Bates Road, Perrysburg.

All proceeds from the event go to a scholarship fund that benefits students in the UT College of Law.

Registration for lunch, dinner and golf starts at $155 per person or $620 for a foursome. Tickets for $40 also are available for those who wish to attend the program for dinner only.

Teams and individual golfers may register here.

For more information, contact Ansley Abrams-Frederick at 419.530.4316 or ansley.abrams@utoledo.edu.

Lucas County judge to deliver UT law commencement address May 6

Judge Myron C. Duhart of the Lucas County Court of Common Pleas will deliver the address at The University of Toledo College of Law’s commencement Saturday, May 6, at 10 a.m. in Thompson Student Union Auditorium.

The ceremony will honor 79 juris doctor and three master of studies in law candidates.

Duhart

Duhart plans to speak to the graduates about giving back and service to the community — two topics about which he is passionate. “It is a privilege for the 2017 graduates to receive their law degree; with that privilege comes a duty to give back to the community,” he said. “I hope to inspire these graduates to give back to the communities that produced them.”

Duhart serves on the bench of the Lucas County Court of Common Pleas, General Division, where he hears both criminal and civil cases.

Prior to taking his place on the bench in 2011, Duhart practiced both criminal defense and personal injury law. As a criminal defense attorney, he litigated several high-profile cases and was part of a select group of attorneys certified by the Ohio Supreme Court to take death penalty cases. He also served in the U.S. Army’s Judge Advocate General Corps, with duty assignment throughout the U.S. and in Panama.

In addition, Duhart shares his extensive litigation experience with UT law students, teaching a course in trial practice.

A lifelong learner, Duhart earned his bachelor’s degree from Wright State University, juris doctor from the UT College of Law in 1996, and is pursuing a master of laws degree in judicial studies from the Duke University School of Law. He also attended the Harvard Kennedy School of Government.

Duhart is noted for his service to the community and serves on the UT College of Law Board of Governors, the UT Paralegal Studies Advisory Board, and the board of Mercy Health System North. He also is past president of Toledo’s Thurgood Marshall Law Association.

“I am delighted that Judge Duhart will be giving our annual commencement address. He is an accomplished alumnus with a record of public service, both a judge and a U.S. Army Judge Advocate General,” said UT Law Dean D. Benjamin Barros. “I look forward to hearing the advice and encouragement he gives to our graduates as they embark on their legal careers.”

Couple gives $1 million for endowed professorship in accounting

Alan H. Barry and his wife, Karen A. Barry, have given their alma mater a $1 million gift to establish an endowment that supports the Alan H. and Karen A. Barry Endowed Professorship in Accounting at The University of Toledo.

The Barrys announced the gift at their home in Scottsdale, Ariz., April 21 at an alumni event for the Phoenix Chapter of the UT Alumni Association. University President Sharon L. Gaber attended the event in Scottsdale as the alumni chapter’s invited speaker.

Karen A. Barry, left, and her husband, Alan H. Barry, signed an agreement April 21 with UT President Sharon L. Gaber to establish an endowed professorship in accounting at the University.

“UT’s College of Business and Innovation has benefited greatly from the generosity of Alan and Karen Barry through their many gifts, which have supported both the Management and Accounting departments,” Gaber said. “Their donations have helped our business faculty prepare UT students to enter the accounting and management professions with all of the necessary critical-thinking skills and core business principles to succeed as leaders in today’s competitive marketplace.

“This newest gift from Alan and Karen Barry to endow a professorship adds another level of support, ensuring that our students are receiving the best possible education in accounting, and that our faculty have the resources they need to deliver an education of excellence,” she said. “The University is deeply grateful for Alan and Karen Barry’s generous gift and all that they do to support UT students.”

The Alan H. and Karen A. Barry Endowed Professorship in Accounting will be used to recruit or retain a professor in the Department of Accounting; any costs related to the recruitment of a faculty member; bridge or pilot research projects; faculty and staff development costs; curriculum development; the development of a fellowship program; and specialized equipment needed for teaching.

“We are ecstatic that Alan and Karen have made such a tremendously generous gift to establish the endowed professorship in accounting in the College of Business,” said Dr. Gary Insch, dean of the College of Business and Innovation. “Their action will benefit countless students for years to come and further elevate the College of Business and Innovation’s reputation. Alan shows how much he truly cares about our students by frequently coming to campus when he is in town, and taking the time to meet and talk with business students, answering their real-life questions, and being a true mentor to them. We cannot thank Alan and Karen enough for their kindness, generosity and support.”

Alan Barry, who is a certified public accountant and the retired president and chief operating officer of the Fortune 200 company Masco Corp., said giving back to UT students is a pleasure: “The accounting background I got at the University was beneficial to me throughout my career. I’ve always been a supporter of the University, and once I was in a position to do so financially, I felt pretty good about giving back to the University that gave me the opportunity to succeed.”

He joined Brass Craft Manufacturing Co. in 1972 as controller and became president of that Masco division in 1988. In 1996, he became a group president of Masco, a manufacturer of home improvement and building products. He has broad business experience that includes finance, manufacturing, customer development, acquisitions and general operating management.

He serves on the board of directors of the H.W. Kaufman Financial Group. He is a retired director of Arch Aluminum & Glass Co. Inc., Scotts Miracle Gro Co., Flint Inc., and IPS Corp. He also served as an executive board member of the Plumbing Manufacturing Institute from 1985 through 2000, and as chairman of the institute in 1994. In addition, Barry served on the executive board of the associate member division of the American Supply Association during 1995 and 1996.

The Barrys have a history of philanthropy at The University of Toledo. In 2014, the University named a new accounting lab in the College of Business and Innovation for Alan Barry. At the time the lab was established, it was the first one nationwide to have a certified management accountant license, in which students could access for free the review material from Wiley, a leading provider of educational programs for professionals and students who are preparing for the certified management accountant exam.

The lab also serves as the location of the free income tax preparation assistance the College of Business and Innovation provides annually to qualified, low- to moderate-income individuals and families in the Toledo area during the spring income tax filing season.

“I am truly grateful for Karen and Alan Barry for their continuous support to the accounting students,” Dr. Hassan HassabElnaby, professor and chair of the UT Department of Accounting, said. “It’s only through people like Karen and Alan that we are able to provide the high-quality education we offer at the UT College of Business and Innovation. It has been my privilege to see Alan as a guest speaker in the classrooms, meeting and advising accounting students, supporting their development through the state-of-the-art Alan Barry Accounting Lab and the $1 million gift.”

The Barrys also endowed the Alan and Karen Barry Scholarship Fund, which provides support for full-time UT business accounting students, based on both merit and needs. Alan Barry, a native of Toledo, is an active UT Alumni Association Phoenix Chapter member, as well as an active member in UT’s Blue Key organization. He also serves on the UT Foundation Board of Trustees.

The couple’s interest in supporting accounting students through financing scholarships, the accounting lab and the endowed professorship grew out of a nostalgic return to campus. “I was invited back to the University about 15 or so years ago. I hadn’t been on the campus for a long time, and I guess I kind of fell in love with the place for the second time.” The Barrys have been supportive donors ever since.

Alan received a business degree in 1966, and Karen graduated in 1964 with an associate degree.

The Department of Accounting is accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business, International. This prestigious accreditation places the department among the top 2 percent of accounting departments worldwide.

Toledo Section of American Chemical Society celebrates 100th anniversary

The Toledo Local Section of the American Chemical Society will celebrate its 100th anniversary Thursday, April 27, with a talk by Barbara Floyd, interim director of University Libraries, on her book “The Glass City: Toledo and the Industry That Built It.”

The book talk, part of the Toledo-Lucas County Public Library’s Open Book Program, will take place at 6 p.m. in McMaster Auditorium of the Toledo main library downtown.

Barbara Floyd will discuss her book, “The Glass City: Toledo and the Industry That Built It,” Thursday, April 27, at 6 p.m. in the Toledo-Lucas County Public Library McMaster Auditorium in downtown.

Floyd’s book, which chronicles the history of Toledo’s most important industry, was published by the University of Michigan Press. It was the winner of the Bowling Green State University’s Center for Archival Collection Local History Publication Award for the best book in the academic scholar category for 2015.

The Toledo Section of the American Chemical Society was founded by members of the UT Department of Chemistry faculty in 1917. The Toledo group is one of 187 local sections of the organization. The society’s mission is “to advance the broader chemistry enterprise and its practitioners for the benefit of Earth and its people.”

According to Joanna Hinton, past chair of the Toledo section, the group will hold events throughout the year in what it is calling its “Chem-tennial 2017.”

The talk at the library will include the presentation of awards to American Chemical Society members for their service.

Floyd, who is also director of the Ward M. Canaday Center for Special Collections, will sign copies of her book, which will be available for sale, after the talk.

For more information on the free, public talk, contact Hinton at 419.346.8876 or visit http://toledosection.sites.acs.org.

University Women’s Commission recognizes employees, awards scholarships to students

Five UT employees were honored last week for exceptional achievement and dedication to the campus community at the 31st annual Outstanding Women’s Award ceremony.

More than 70 attended the University Women’s Commission program, which was held Wednesday in the Savage Arena Joe Grogan Room. Dr. Amanda Bryant-Friedrich, dean of the College of Graduate Studies, gave a talk, “Oh, the Places You’ll Go!” The 2015 recipient of the Alice H. Skeens Outstanding Woman Award shared her story, including her love of science, working in Europe, and how she came to UT.

Recipients of the 2017 Dr. Alice H. Skeens Outstanding Woman Award were, from left, Dr. Kasumi Yamazaki, Dr. Kaye M. Patten, Sherry Stanfa-Stanley, Dr. Nina I. McClelland and Dr. Dorothea Sawicki.

The recipients of the 2017 Dr. Alice H. Skeens Outstanding Woman Award were:

• Dr. Nina I. McClelland, dean emerita of the College of Arts and Sciences, professor emerita of chemistry, and executive in residence in the College of Business and Innovation. She served as dean of the College of Arts and Sciences from 2008 to 2011. A UT alumna, she received a bachelor’s degree in biology in 1951 and a master’s degree in interdisciplinary studies in 1963. McClelland also received an honorary doctorate of science from the University. During her career, she has won numerous honors, including the 2016 Women in Conservation Award from the National Wildlife Federation for her accomplishments in protecting safe water around the world, promoting clean energy, and preserving wildlife and habitats in Ohio. In 2010, she was inducted into the Ohio Women’s Hall of Fame.

“Dr. McClelland is internationally recognized for her expertise in environmental chemistry. She was elected director at large of the American Chemical Society and served in that role for nine years. She was elected chair of the board of directors, a position she held for three years. Nina served the NSF International for 30 years, including 15 years as chair of the board of directors and executive committee, president and chief executive officer,” one nominator wrote. “Dr. McClelland is an amazing woman who has dedicated her life to using science to make this world a better place.”

• Dr. Kaye M. Patten, senior vice president for student affairs. She has been working at the University 12 years. She served as chair of the 2016 UT Community Charitable Campaign, which exceeded its goal and raised $134,568 for nearly 220 nonprofit area organizations.

“I have worked with many dedicated women in my 30 years in higher education. Dr. Kaye is in a class by herself. Through working with her, I have witnessed a level of energy, commitment, respect and advocacy for students that I had not experienced before,” one nominator wrote. “Dr. Patten treats each student exactly how she would want her own son or daughter treated. I have admired and appreciated Dr. Kaye’s approach — to always be upfront with students, letting them know their responsibilities and how UT can help them achieve their goals. She understands the life-changing power of higher education, and it is clear that she wants the best for our students. If she is not attending a student event after hours or on weekends, she is representing the University in the community through the Toledo branch of Links Inc., a women’s service organization whose mission is to enrich the cultural and economic lives of African Americans. Dr. Kaye does nothing halfway — if she makes a commitment, she’s all in. To borrow from the UTC3 campaign slogan: She simply gives.”

• Dr. Dorothea Sawicki, vice provost for health affairs and university accreditation, and professor of medical microbiology and immunology. In 1977, she began her career as an assistant professor at the Medical College of Ohio. She received tenure and worked her way up to professor. She also served in several administrative roles in the College of Graduate Studies and in the College of Medicine and Life Sciences; as secretary-treasurer of the American Society for Virology since 2006; and as a member of the Journal of Virology editorial board since 1988.

“Dr. Sawicki has contributed to the University in a variety of ways for almost 40 years. She was one of the first people I met when I began at UT in 2010. At the time, I was a temporary hire helping the institution prepare for its Higher Learning Commission accreditation visit, and Thea was one of the committee co-chairs. I was immediately struck by her direct, no-nonsense approach to getting things done,” one nominator wrote. “I appreciate the historical background she is often able to provide about some obscure policy or way of doing things, and her unwavering commitment to the University. She is successful in her field and is a role model for women in science; she is extremely involved in the UT community at all levels; she maintains a positive, can-do attitude in her work; and she is active in various women’s issues.”

• Sherry Stanfa-Stanley, director of communication and fund stewardship with the UT Foundation. She joined the University in 1992. Over the past 25 years, she has significantly enhanced the Foundation’s internal and external communications, donor relations, and stewardship efforts. A UT alumna, she received a bachelor’s degree in communication in 1983. In 2013, Stanfa-Stanley embarked on “The 52/52 Project,” a year where she challenged herself every week with a new experience. As she turned 52, she shook things up. Her adventures included suiting up as Rocksy the mascot for a UT soccer game; babysitting quadruplets; wearing pajamas in public for a day; riding with police and going on a raid with the vice squad and SWAT team; visiting a nude beach; performing as a mime outside a shopping center in Kentucky; and crashing a wedding reception — and catching the bride’s bouquet.

“All the while, Sherry blogged about her amazingly crazy year on Facebook.com/The52at52Project. The witty writer served up entertainment and enlightenment for nearly 5,000 followers. Her book, ‘Finding My Badass Self: A Year of Truths and Dares,’ will be published Aug. 15 by She Writes Press,” one nominator wrote. “Sherry likes to call herself ‘a cautionary tale,’ but she really is a role model, showing it’s never too late to change your life. Her heady heroism is inspiring.”

• Dr. Kasumi Yamazaki, assistant professor of Japanese in the Department of Foreign Languages. She started to work part time at UT in 2011. She is the social media coordinator for the Japanese Studies Program and adviser of the Calligraphy Club. She also is a translator in various community organizations local and abroad, as well as assistant coordinator for the Toledo Sister Cities International. A UT alumna, she received a bachelor of arts degree in global studies in 2009, a master of arts degree in English in 2011, and a doctoral degree in curriculum and instruction in 2015.

“Dr. Yamazaki’s contributions and achievements are numerous and balanced in research, teaching and service. She has three articles in press, and in the 2016-17 academic year, she presented or is scheduled to present eight sessions at international and national conferences,” one nominator wrote. “Dr. Yamazaki has implemented a 3D virtual world simulation game into Japanese as a foreign language classroom and designed an immersive Japanese curriculum for her students. She uses an experiential and integrative computer-assisted language learning framework, conducting classes in a 3D massive multiplayer online learning environment to enhance students’ acquisition of Japanese and cultural proficiency. With what Dr. Yamazaki calls computer-assisted learning of communication, she developed an advanced Japanese course that is based in a 3D simulation in Tokyo. Through communicative collaboration with native Japanese game-users online, she made it possible for students to acquire knowledge to function in Japan.”

Students who received $1,000 scholarships from the University Women’s Commissin were, from left, Areeba Shaw, Bianca Caniglia, Jennifer Zaurov and Jessica Angelov.

The University Women’s Commission also presented $1,000 scholarships to four students. Receiving awards based on academic achievement, support of women’s and gender issues, and campus involvement were Jessica Angelov, a senior majoring in interdisciplinary studies with a minor in entrepreneurship, family and small business; Bianca Caniglia, a senior majoring in environmental science with a minor in women’s and gender studies; Jennifer Zaurov, a junior majoring in communication with a minor in psychology; and Areeba Shaw, a sophomore majoring in media communication.

2017 Pacemaker Awards to honor local entrepreneur, outstanding UT business students

The University of Toledo College of Business and Innovation and the Business Engagement and Leadership Council will recognize both business and academic excellence during their 54th annual Pacemaker Awards Friday, April 7, at the Inverness Club.

Receiving the 2017 Business Pacemaker Award is Brent L. Cousino, acting chief operating officer and chief financial officer for VentureMed Group. VentureMed is a medical device startup company based at ProMedica Innovations in Toledo. Its first product was approved by the FDA last year, and sales have begun in Europe and the United States.

Cousino

He is also CEO of Browning Cousineau Corp., a private advisory firm founded in 2012 focused in the health-care industry. He serves on the advisory board of Principle Business Enterprises in Bowling Green. From 2012 to 2015, he served as CEO of IRISense LLC, a biomedical device startup at UT Innovation Enterprises. During that time, he also served as assistant for business outreach and engagement for then UT College of Business and Innovation Dean Thomas Gutteridge, as well as an entrepreneur-in-residence for UT Innovation Enterprises.

Cousino co-founded the CPA firm of Nachtrab, Cousino, O’Neil, Treuhaft & Co. in 1984 with a primary focus on the health-care industry and led a merger with Plante Moran in 1997. He went on to build a national feasibility consulting practice and retired from Plante Moran in 2012.

Active in community service, Cousino is a member of the Mercy Health – Toledo Market board of directors, a seven hospital region of Mercy Health, and serves on its strategy development committee. He is involved in Toledo Rotary and the Young Presidents’ Organization. He also has served in numerous board leadership capacities over the years; these include the UT Alumni Association, Imagination Station, Lott Industries, Sunshine Communities, St. Michael’s in the Hills, and the Young Presidents’ Organization Maumee Valley Chapter.

A 1978 UT alumnus who graduated with a bachelor of business administration degree in accounting, Cousino received a Student Pacemaker Award in 1977 and in 1997 received the Outstanding Accountant Award from UT’s Beta Alpha Psi Chapter. In 2000, he was named to the Sylvania Schools Distinguished Alumni Hall of Fame. He lives in Toledo with his wife, Pam, and they have two sons who live in Washington, D.C.

“Recipients of the Pacemaker Award over the past five decades read as a Who’s Who of current and legendary business leaders in the Toledo region,” said Dr. Gary Insch, dean of the UT College of Business and Innovation, “and Brent Cousino certainly belongs in that impressive roster. The Pacemaker Award is the College of Business and Innovation’s highest honor, recognizing individuals for outstanding achievement in business, as well as contributions to the community and the University.”

Student Pacemaker Awards are presented to UT College of Business and Innovation graduate and undergraduate students for their outstanding academic achievement, University and community service, and leadership.

The 2017 student Pacemakers are: Master of Business Administration — Alejandro Vera; Executive Master of Business Administration — Abul Faiz Ahmed; Master of Science in Accountancy — Malachi Benesh; Accounting — Dana Breese, Jessica Knepper; Finance — Jordan Spellis, Elizabeth Bates; Information Operations Technology Management — Abdulmonem Alfadhel, Brad Spelman; Management — Jesseca Perkins, Hala Abou-Dahech; Marketing/International Business — Grant Horlamus, Gabriella LeMaster; Applied Organizational Technology — Teresa Rodriguez, administrative assistant in UT Undergraduate Admission; and Dean’s Recipient — Patrick Ryan.

UT professor selected as one of three finalists for $250,000 national teaching award

A leadership scholar at The University of Toledo is a finalist for a prestigious national teaching award.

Dr. Clinton Longenecker, Distinguished University Professor and director of the Center for Leadership and Organizational Excellence in the UT College of Business and Innovation, is one of three finalists selected for Baylor University’s 2018 Robert Foster Cherry Award for Great Teaching.

Longenecker

The other finalists are Dr. Heidi Elmendorf, associate professor of biology at Georgetown University, and Dr. Neil Garg, professor of chemistry at UCLA.

The Cherry Award is the only national teaching award — with the single largest monetary reward of $250,000 — presented by a college or university to an individual for exceptional teaching.

“To be selected as one of three finalists for this prestigious award is an absolute honor, and I’m very proud to represent The University of Toledo on this national stage,” Longenecker said. “I’ve considered my entire career to be a privilege, an opportunity to make a difference, and a blessing to be able to teach adult learners how to improve their skills and career trajectory.”

As Cherry Award finalists, each professor will receive $15,000, as well as $10,000 for their home departments to foster the development of teaching skills. Each finalist will present a series of lectures at Baylor during fall 2017 and also a Cherry Award lecture on their home campuses during the upcoming academic year.

The Cherry Award winner, which will be announced by Baylor in 2018, will receive $250,000 and an additional $25,000 for his or her home department and will teach in residence at Baylor during fall 2018 or spring 2019.

“With close to 100 nominees from a very strong field, the Cherry Committee had the difficult task of naming three finalists for the 2018 Cherry Award,” said Dr. Michael W. Thompson, committee chair and associate dean for undergraduate programs in Baylor’s School of Engineering and Computer Science. “It is gratifying and inspirational to learn about each nominee’s accomplishments and dedication to great teaching. The three finalists for the 2018 award are excellent scholars and great teachers, and we look forward to hosting their campus visits during the fall 2017 semester.”

The Cherry Award program is designed to honor great teachers, to stimulate discussion in the academy about the value of teaching, and to encourage departments and institutions to value their own great teachers. Individuals nominated for the award have proven records as extraordinary teachers with positive, inspiring and long-lasting effects on students, along with records of distinguished scholarship.

“Dr. Longenecker is a UT alumnus who makes a difference every day for his students as an effective and passionate classroom leader,” UT President Sharon L. Gaber said. “This is a well-deserved honor, and we wish him luck through the Cherry Award experience.”

“I’m greatly humbled by this recognition as I work in a student-centered institution with lots of great teachers,” Longenecker said. “For me, teaching isn’t about just presenting information to my students. Rather, it is all about helping students improve their motivation, their integration and mastery of important ideas, concepts and practices, as well as their application to be able to do the things necessary to be successful with their careers and personal lives. In the final analysis, teaching is all about transforming students, and as a comprehensive University that is what we do and do well across all disciplines.”

Longenecker has received more than 60 teaching, service and research awards and numerous industry awards. In 2013, he was recognized by The Economist as one of the “Top 15 Business Professors in the World.”

His teaching, research and consulting interests are in high-performance leadership and creating great organizations. Longenecker has published more than 190 articles and papers in academic and professional journals, as well as several best-selling books. His latest book, “The Successful Career Survival Guide,” was published in March.

New class to be inducted into Global Medical Missions Hall of Fame

The University of Toledo College of Medicine and Life Science’s Global Medical Missions Hall of Fame will induct a new class of honorees Saturday, April 1.

The Galilee Medical Center, Dr. Donald C. Mullen and Dr. Vadrevu (V.K.) Raju will be honored during the program in Collier Building Room 1000 on UT’s Health Science Campus beginning at 7:30 p.m.

“People to People Medicine” is the vision of the Galilee Medical Center, which is a national center of excellence and represents the highest ethical principles and humane values, reaching beyond the sectarian religious and ethnic hatreds that bloody most of the Middle East. Syria, racked by its own civil war, continues to maintain its decades old war with its southern neighbor, Israel, while actively supporting continuing terror against the Jewish state.

The Israeli hospital and its multi-religious and ethnic staff are a few kilometers from the northern border with Syria and accepts the war wounded and civilian personnel who are secretly spirited across the border from the devastating conflict in Syria seeking and receiving care.

Mullen

For the past 30 years, Dr. Donald Mullen has devoted his life to working in developing countries around the world. Born in Charlotte, N.C., he graduated from the Citadel in 1957 and received a medical degree and completed his residency at Duke University in 1969. After 20 years as a successful cardiovascular surgeon in Charlotte and Milwaukee who performed more than 3,000 open-heart procedures and many thousands of thoracic and vascular surgeries, he obtained a master of divinity at Princeton Theological Seminary and was ordained in the Presbyterian Church (USA) in 1991.

In 1980, Mullen received a call from the World Medical Mission to go to Tenwek Hospital in Kenya for a month, and his life has not been the same since. He made a radical change of direction in his life, working throughout the world as a dedicated medical missionary. He has worked for the Presbyterian Church (USA), Samaritans Purse International Relief, the Christian Medical and Dental Association, and as chairman of the board of the Philadelphia International Foundation. He has worked in three war zones; twice in Iraq and in Sudan and Rwanda, and in Africa, the Far East and the Middle East.

Mullen concluded his career as a parish associate in Highland, N.C., where he also was elected mayor. He has recently published a book of his life, “A Radical Change of Direction; Memoir of the Spiritual Journey of a Surgeon.”

Raju

For the past four decades, Dr. Vadrevu (V.K.) Raju has been on a crusade to eliminate avoidable blindness in parts of the world plagued by poverty and poor access to medical care. Born in India, he earned a medical degree from Andrah University and completed an ophthalmology residency and fellowship at the Royal Eye Group of Hospitals in London. He is board-certified in ophthalmology and is a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons and the American College of Surgeons. He is a clinical professor at West Virginia University, the section chief of the Ophthalmology Department at Monongalia General Hospital, and runs a private practice.

Raju is the founder and medical director of the Eye Foundation of America. World-class state-of-the art services are rendered through traveling eye camps and permanent brick-and-motor hospitals built by the foundation, including the Goutami Eye Institute that Raju helped found in 2006. Since the inception of the Eye Foundation of America, these camps and institutes have facilitated more than 600 physician exchanges, trained more than 200 ophthalmologists, served 2 million patients, and performed 300,000 vision-saving surgeries in 21 countries operating on three guiding principles: service, teaching and research.

In children, the main focus of efforts by the Eye Foundation of America, the gift of sight results in 75 years of a full and productive life. No child will be denied treatment, and children from around the world can come to receive world-class services. Raju has said, “If blindness is preventable, then let us do it big.”

In addition, Drs. Anne and Randall Ruch, will receive the Lawrence V. Conway Distinguished Lifetime Service Award, and the UT College of Medicine and Life Sciences Alumni Community Award will be given to Dr. David Grossman.

Randall and Anne Ruch

Since 1998, the Ruchs have led short-term mission trips to Guatemala after witnessing the deplorable conditions of the people living in a garbage dump and promising them that they would make a difference in their community. Nine years later, SewHope, their nonprofit organization was formed that signifies the hope of Shannon E. Wilson, a young physician who had an abounding compassion for the people of Guatemala, who died in 2006 before her dreams could be fulfilled. SewHope provides health care, nutrition, education, spiritual growth and opportunity to marginalized people in one of the most neglected parts of the world. The couple’s altruistic mission also led them to form a local nonprofit organization, Compassion Health Toledo, so they could address the health-care shortage in a medically under-served area of Toledo.

Grossman

Grossman graduated in 1974 from the former Medical College of Ohio and completed an internship, residency and fellowship there in 1978. He began his medical career as a member of the medical staff at Toledo and St. Vincent’s hospitals and in an internal medicine group practice. In 1989, he began his public career working for the city of Toledo’s Board of Health, was Toledo’s health commissioner and then medical director. Grossman was instrumental in the merger of the county and city health departments, and in 2000, he became the health commissioner of the combined Toledo-Lucas County Health Department, a position that he held for 16 years. Grossman was successful in the passage of the statewide smoking ban, and in 2007, he was awarded the Public Health Guardian Award by the Association of Ohio Health Commissioners, which gives recognition to outstanding and significant activities resulting in a positive impact on public health for his work on the smoking ban hearings.

In conjunction with the induction, the College of Medicine Students for Medical Missions will host a symposium, “Together, We Are the Change in Medicine,” Saturday, April 1, from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in Health Education Building 110. Speakers will include Mullen, Raju and the Ruchs.

Dr. Lawrence V. Conway, UT professor emeritus of finance, founded the Global Medical Missions Hall of Fame in 2004 to honor individuals and organizations that have made significant contributions to advancing the medical well-being of people around the world. In 2006, the Global Medical Missions Hall of Fame became affiliated with the UT College of Medicine and Life Sciences. The hall of fame can be seen in the lobby of the Jacobs Interprofessional Immersive Simulation Center.

RSVPs are requested for the free, public event: Call 419.530.2586 or 1.800.235.6766, or email medmissionhof@utoledo.edu.

Former Ohio Supreme Court Justice donates papers to UT

Former Ohio Supreme Court Justice and Toledo native Judith Ann Lanzinger recently donated her personal papers to the Ward M. Canaday Center for Special Collections at The University of Toledo.

Lanzinger, who is the only person ever elected to all four levels of Ohio’s judiciary, retired from the state’s highest court in 2016.

Former Ohio Supreme Court Justice and UT law alumna Judith Ann Lanzinger, second from left, recently donated her personal papers to the Ward M. Canaday Center for Special Collections. She posed for a photo with, from left, Lauren White, manuscripts librarian and lecturer; D. Benjamin Barros, dean of the College of Law; and Barbara Floyd, director of the Canaday Center and interim director of University Libraries, who propped up a 2007 portrait of justices from the Supreme Court of Ohio.

During her long career, she also served on the 6th District Court of Appeals, the Lucas County Court of Common Pleas and the Toledo Municipal Court.

The Canaday Center, the special collections department of the UT Libraries, has long collected manuscript materials related to the history of women in northwest Ohio. Noteworthy collections include the papers of educators, politicians and activists such as Linda Furney, Betty Mauk, Betty Morais, Mary Boyle Burns, Ella P. Stewart and Olive Colton. The center recently has begun collaborating with the College of Law to preserve the history of Toledo’s women lawyers and judges.

“We are delighted to help ensure this important history is accessible to future scholars and citizens,” said D. Benjamin Barros, dean of the College of Law.

As part of this collaboration with the College of Law, the center also recently acquired a collection of scrapbooks documenting the career of Geraldine Macelwane, the first woman elected judge of the Toledo Municipal Court (appointed in 1952) and the first woman judge of the Lucas County Common Pleas Court (appointed in 1956). She died in 1974.

“Justice Lanzinger is one of our most distinguished alumni, having notably served at all levels of the Ohio judiciary. We are honored that the University is able to house her papers, which we hope will encourage and inspire others to civic engagement,” Barros said.

The Lanzinger collection contains photographs, awards and research files documenting her judicial career. Of particular note are the former justice’s case notes that provide insight into her thoughts and opinions as they developed during trials.

“This collection will provide a rich source of information on many aspects of Justice Lanzinger’s career,” said Barbara Floyd, director of the Canaday Center and interim director of University Libraries. “We hope to continue to collect and preserve the papers of other women lawyers and judges from this area to add to these collections.”

Lanzinger said, “I am honored that the Ward M. Canaday Center has accepted these documents that represent my 31 years of service at all levels of Ohio’s judiciary. I hope they may be of help in future academic projects at The University of Toledo, my alma mater.”

For more information on the collection, contact Floyd at 419.530.2170.

Rocket fans: Psych up for MAC Tournament

See you at the Mid-American Conference Tournament! The UT Alumni Association will host pre-game events in Cleveland before the women’s and men’s contests this week.

Pre-game parties will begin two hours prior to tipoff at Harry Buffalo, 2120 E. 4th St., Cleveland, just across the street from Quicken Loans Arena.

The women’s team will play Wednesday, March 8, at 7:30 p.m., and the Alumni Association pregame party at Harry Buffalo will begin at 5:30 p.m. 

The men’s team will hit the hardwood Thursday, March 9, at 6:30 p.m., and the Alumni Association pregame party at Harry Buffalo will begin at 4:30 p.m.

Admission to each pregame event is $15 per person. Reservations are appreciated but are not required, and walk-ins are welcome.

The all-you-can-eat menu for Wednesday, March 8, will include chicken tenders, beef sliders with cheddar cheese, sheet pizzas, chicken salad, croissant sandwiches and a house salad. Soft drinks and iced tea are included with the meal, and a cash bar will be available. 

The menu for Thursday, March 9, will include buffalo chicken egg rolls, fried ravioli, barbecue pulled pork sliders, sheet pizzas and a house salad.

To register, contact The University of Toledo Office of Alumni Relations at 419.530.2853 or 800.235.6766, or click here.