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UT law graduates have strong showing in Ohio bar exams

The number of graduates from The University of Toledo College of Law who passed the July bar exam in Ohio on the first try is well above the state average.

The newly released data shows the first-time passage rate for UT law graduates taking the bar exam is 84 percent, up from 74 percent last year in July. The state average in Ohio this year is 79 percent.

“We have done a lot in the past three years to revamp our bar program, and it is gratifying to see positive results,” D. Benjamin Barros, dean of the UT College of Law, said. “We hope to continue this positive trend into the future as we see the impact of improved credentials of first-year students entering the UT College of Law and further improvements to our bar program.”

The UT College of Law is committed to preparing students for a successful career with programming and partnerships dedicated to bar passage.

In the last few years, the College of Law aligned its curriculum to bar-tested subjects, developed a new first-year support program, expanded its third-year bar prep course, and implemented a legal analysis course and academic success contracts.

The UT College of Law also created the position of director of academic success and bar preparation. This position held by Lesa Byrnes oversees the Bar Passage Program that is designed to prepare both third-year students and graduates for the bar exam. Through post-graduation mentoring, every UT law graduate is paired with a faculty mentor to provide support during bar exam study.

Most recently, the UT College of Law partnered with BARBRI, a company headquartered in Texas, to offer student access to its comprehensive bar review course with flexible classroom, online and mobile learning environments.

Trick play scores love of a lifetime for UT alumni

It’s not something you see every day: A baseball player striding to the Rocket logo in the center of the Glass Bowl and hitting it out of the stadium. But that’s exactly what Josh Johnson did.

With the help of Rocky and Rocksy, the former UT outfielder surprised his girlfriend, Cara Wasserman, by popping the question Oct. 20 and sliding a diamond on her finger.

Cara Wasserman and Josh Johnson held the UT blanket while posing for a photo with Rocky and Rocksy after the couple became engaged Oct. 20 in the Glass Bowl.

At 8:30 a.m. on game day, the couple met their friends, Eric and Neena Mossing, in lot 10.

“We played it off as a contest, that Neena and Eric won passes to tour the Glass Bowl, and they asked Cara to go as she’s a huge Toledo football fan,” Johnson said.

After the Rocket Marching Band finished rehearsing, Rocky and Rocksy met the four fans in the center of the stadium, posed for photos, and began handing out prizes. Eric received a UT beer stein and said, “I can use this today!” Neena, a 2011 UT alumna, got a Rocket coffee mug. And then the mascots unfolded a blanket with a photo of Johnson and Wasserman in their Rocket gear with the words: “Cara Lynn, will you marry me?”

Johnson dropped down on one knee and opened a ring box.

“What the — oh my god! Yes, I will! What the heck, Josh?” Wasserman said. “Oh my god, that is so awesome!”

As the couple embraced and kissed near the 50-yard line, Wasserman’s parents came on the field. After a round of hugs, Rick Wasserman, who played tight end for the Rockets and graduated with a bachelor’s degree in business administration in 1979, said, “It’s time to start the tailgate.”

Josh Johnson surprised Cara Wasserman when he knelt down and asked her to marry him prior to the Oct. 20 Toledo football game.

“We popped champagne,” Wasserman said, adding she had no clue what was going to happen. “Even when we walked on the field, I still thought we won a contest. It didn’t literally dawn on me until he got down on one knee.”

And when she saw the blanket?

“It took me a minute because I saw the mascots take it out of the bag. I saw it was a blanket, but it was turned around, so I saw the backside of it. And I thought: That’s cool, it’s a Toledo blanket,” she said. “And then Rocky and Rocksy were holding it, and I’m like, Oh my gosh, that’s our picture on the blanket!”

Keeping the plan under cover was easy for Johnson — until Saturday morning.

“She kept pushing the snooze button, and I kept looking at the clock,” he said. “I basically pushed her out of bed so she’d get up. And then on the drive there, it started to hit me quite a bit. Most times, I’m not really driving that fast, but I felt like I was going 85 miles per hour to get there.

“It really kicked in when we got there at 8:22, and Eric and Neena weren’t there yet at the tailgate. So I started freaking out: Oh my gosh, they’re going to be late, and everything’s going to be thrown off. I started getting really nervous. And then on the walk in, I’m surprised Cara didn’t notice because I felt like I was having seizures I was shaking so bad.”

Rocksy and Rocky posed with, from left, Eric and Neena Mossing, Cara Wasserman and Josh Johnson. This shot of the “contest winners” was taken before the proposal.

Johnson started planning to ask the big question in the spring.

“With her dad being a former football player, she grew up a huge Rocket fan. And being a former UT athlete myself, with the last home game on a Saturday, that was the perfect time,” he said.

“We’ve been going to Toledo games since I was super-little; we love Toledo football,” Wasserman said. “We always tailgate. That’s another reason I didn’t think anything of it because our friends were down there setting up their tailgate, and they usually get there pretty early. So when he said 8:30 we need to be down there, I was like, OK, make sure my parents know what time we’re tailgating.”

Johnson played baseball for the Rockets from 2007 to 2010 and graduated with an individualized degree from University College in 2014. He is the recreation program specialist at the Village of Archbold’s Department of Parks and Recreation.

Wasserman received a bachelor of education degree in 2011 and is an intervention specialist in special education and math teacher at Fassett Junior High School in Oregon. She is pursuing a master of education degree in curriculum and instruction at the University.

They are looking for a home in between Archbold and Oregon, and discussing wedding plans for next year.

“We both knew we wanted to be together and get married, but it was always like the future — I did not think it would be now. I am super-thrilled that it is now, but I had no idea,” Wasserman said. “I am super-excited! I just keep thinking about Saturday.”

Sorority celebrates 90 years on campus

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Inc. was founded at Howard University Jan. 15, 1908, and is the oldest Greek letter organization established by African-American women.

Since then, it has become an international service organization, hosting graduate and undergraduate chapters in the United States, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Liberia, the Bahamas, Bermuda, Canada, Dubai, Germany, Japan and South Korea.

UT President Sharon L. Gaber, center, presented a proclamation in honor of the 90th anniversary of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Inc.’s Alpha Lambda Chapter to, from left, Morgannia Dawson, president of the Zeta Alpha Omega Chapter; Cheryl Wallace, graduate adviser of the Alpha Lambda Chapter; Marisa DuPree, president of the Alpha Lambda Chapter; and Carrie Clark, regional director of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Inc.

On Dec. 10, 1928, the Alpha Lambda Chapter was established at The University of Toledo.

Fast-forward to Oct. 7: More than 100 guests attended the chapter’s 90th anniversary celebration in Toledo.

“We are honored to be part of the oldest Greek letter organization founded by African-American women,” said Cheryl Wallace, graduate advisor of the Alpha Lambda Chapter and UT alumna who received a bachelor’s degree in business administration in 1984. “Our event was well-represented by members who have more than 50 years of service within the organization, and former chapter members traveled from Los Angeles, Atlanta and Houston to help us celebrate.”

Dignitaries in attendance included Dr. Sharon L. Gaber, president of The University of Toledo; Catherine Crosby, chief of staff to Toledo Mayor Wade Kapszukiewicz; and Toledo City Councilman Larry Sykes.

Proclamations were provided by Congresswoman Marcy Kaptur and the Lucas County Commissioners.

“Alpha Kappa Alpha prides itself on being grounded in academic excellence and service to everyone,” said Wallace, who retired after 25 years in the pharmaceutical industry at Sanofi and is a fitness trainer at Essence Mind and Body Studio in Maumee. “Supported by the University Wellness Coalition, the Alpha Lambda Chapter spearheads health education initiatives, grounded in topics such as health, wellness, the arts and economic well-being.”

Gaber read a proclamation at the anniversary event and thanked the chapter for 90 years of service to the Toledo area.

“The University expresses its sincere appreciation as we celebrate your successful programming efforts alongside your members,” Gaber said.

The UT proclamation stated Oct. 7 shall be known as Alpha Lambda Chapter’s Day of Service on campus.

NIH doctor to give lecture on connecting body, mind and spirit to heal

It’s only recently in the great history of medicine that a disease could genuinely be cured. Hippocrates practiced 2,500 years ago, but simple antibacterial drugs that could knock out illnesses like pneumonia or strep throat weren’t widely available until the late 1940s.

With cures elusive, the focus of physicians was doing what they could to make the patient whole. That mission is still important today, said Dr. Ann Berger, chief of pain and palliative care at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, who will speak at The University of Toledo this week.

Berger

“In medicine, there can be healing or curing. Most illnesses at this point in time we are not actually curing,” Berger said. “But what we can do in medicine is help people heal. The common thread of healing is putting together mind, body and spirit. Even when we do cure patients, trying to help the person reach psychosocial spiritual healing is extremely important and desired by the patient.”

Berger will discuss the theory and history of healing in a lecture titled “The Importance of Psychosocial Spiritual Healing in Health Care” as the featured speaker Thursday, Oct. 25, at the 10th annual S. Amjad Hussain Visiting Lecture in the History of Medicine and Surgery.

The free, public lecture will begin at 5 p.m. in Collier Building Room 1000 on UT’s Health Science Campus.

A 1988 graduate of the Medical College of Ohio, Berger helped shape the field of palliative care. She lectures nationally and internationally and has published extensively in the field. Berger also edited the first textbook on palliative care and supportive oncology in the country.

She has been chief of pain and palliative care at the NIH Clinical Center since 2000.

Berger said there is a long string running throughout the history of healing medicine that link the same ideas of connecting the mind, body and spirit.

“If you go through all the world’s different cultures, from traditional Chinese medicine to Native American medicine, you see this,” Berger said. “We’ll not only talk about how different cultures thought about healing, but we’ll also discuss what we can do as health-care professionals and how healing occurs by doing something intentionally.”

The S. Amjad Hussain Visiting Lecture in the History of Medicine and Surgery was created in honor of Hussain, professor emeritus of cardiovascular surgery and humanities, a former member of the UT Board of Trustees, and columnist for The Blade.

“She is a graduate of our medical school and has made a name for herself in palliative care, which has become a well-recognized specialty in the practice of medicine,” Hussain said. “To bring in someone who is the head of a federal agency in charge of this particular specialty is great for us at The University of Toledo.”

RSVPs are requested; email hscevents@utoledo.edu or call 419.383.6300.

Women & Philanthropy donates books to 40 TPS second-grade classrooms

Women & Philanthropy and the Judith Herb College of Education at The University of Toledo donated more than 1,300 new books to Toledo Public Schools.

The books were distributed to 40 second-grade classrooms at 21 TPS schools.

Second-grade students at Old Orchard Elementary School were excited to receive new books from Women & Philanthropy at The University of Toledo and the UT Judith Herb College of Education.

Marcy McMahon, the chair of Women & Philanthropy, and Dr. Romules Durant, TPS superintendent, presented the books to representatives from each school Oct. 18 at Old Orchard Elementary School.

“Second grade is a critical year for learning to read,” said Dr. Thea Sawicki, chair of the Holiday Project for Women & Philanthropy and professor in the UT Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology. “We are proud to support every school by providing elementary classroom teachers with additional resources to promote early literacy and allow elementary students to gain greater reading skills.”

This is the second year that fundraising for the Encouraging Early Literacy Holiday Project allowed Women & Philanthropy and the Judith Herb College of Education to donate more than 1,000 new books to TPS second-grade classrooms.

Last year, the organizations donated approximately 1,000 books to 33 second-grade classrooms at 19 TPS schools.

This year’s donation covers the remaining classrooms and completes the goal of donating books to start a library in every second-grade classroom at TPS.

“The gift of a book and its potential impact on a young learner’s life cannot be overstated and should not go unrecognized,” Dr. Raymond Witte, dean of the UT Judith Herb College of Education, said. “It is with great pride that we recognize our association with Women & Philanthropy and their mission to better the lives of children in the Toledo region.”

“The Toledo Public Schools is grateful for the continued support of Women & Philanthropy at The University of Toledo,” Durant said. “Our mission is to create college and career-ready students, and that begins with early literacy. Last year, our students received 1,000 books to be distributed in 33 classrooms, which was incredible in and of itself. This year, we are receiving an even larger donation of 1,300 books for 40 classrooms. We are very thankful for the partnership and also their commitment to helping us deliver on our mission.”

Day of Giving raises more than $700,000 in second year

The number of donors who participated in the second annual University of Toledo Day of Giving Oct. 16-17 more than doubled 2017’s participation, with 3,156 donors giving this year.

Alumni and friends, faculty and staff members, and students came together to support Rocket Forward: You Launch Lives, contributing a total of $717,375.

The goal of the 36-hour campaign was to create awareness of the impact of philanthropy at UT and to increase private support among UT students, faculty, staff, alumni and friends.

This year, activities took place on both Health Science Campus and Main Campus, including a carnival-style event on Centennial Mall with student organizations providing games and activities to raise money for the Student Activities Fund. President Sharon L. Gaber visited Health Science Campus for selfies with nursing students and to spread the word about the Day of Giving campaign.

Gifts, designated for a wide variety of uses, were made to this second annual Day of Giving, during which, campaign advocates took to social media to encourage giving.

“We want to thank all of our University of Toledo students, alumni and friends who participated in Day of Giving 2018,” said Cheryl Zwyer, senior associate vice president for development at The University of Toledo Foundation. “Every person’s gift makes a difference. It is wonderful to see Rockets come together to support so many important programs across campus.”

Contributions will help students launch college careers and complete their degrees through scholarships; help faculty continue research that impacts the northwest Ohio region and beyond; fund new drug therapies and medical advancements to improve patient care; and support many UT programs across campus.

Rocket fans have chance to win Jeep at football game Oct. 20

The University has teamed up again with Yark Chrysler-Jeep-Dodge-Ram, Bud Light, and iHeart Media for the Toledo Rocket Fan Jeep Giveaway contest. Rocket fans will have the opportunity to win a brand new Jeep Wrangler at the Saturday, Oct. 20, football game against Buffalo.

“We value being local and working with local partners to provide the people of Toledo with products and services they love,” said John Miller, a representative of Treu House of Munch, which has been part of Toledo since 1875. “This has been one of the biggest and most successful marketing programs we participate in because the people of Toledo support all things Toledo.”

“We are very excited to be sponsoring our third year of the Toledo Rocket Fan Jeep Giveaway,” added Doug Kearns, vice president of Yark Automotive Group. “We love to support our hometown Toledo Rockets as they go after another Mid-American Conference Championship this season.”

“The University of Toledo and the Jeep Wrangler represent some of the best we have to offer in Toledo,” said iHeartRadio Toledo Market President Kellie Holeman. “We’re thrilled to once again give Rocket fans and iHeartRadio listeners the chance to drive away from a game in a brand new Jeep from Yark Automotive Group. It’s just one more exciting part of Rocket Nation.”

NewsRadio 1370 and 92.9 WSPD has been the flagship home of UT football for 52 years, and now games may be heard on the free iHeartRadio app.

The contest will run through Saturday, Oct. 20, with the winner receiving the keys to a brand new 2018 Toledo-made Jeep Wrangler.

Contest participants must be 21 years of age or older to enter. There are three ways to enter (limited to one entry per person) to win:

• Text JEEP to 81530 to enter for a chance to qualify (standard message and data rates apply).

• Go online and enter at WIOT.com.

• Enter to win at the UT vs. Buffalo football game Saturday, Oct. 20.

Two finalists will be selected via text or online entry with the third finalist being selected at the game. The winner will be announced at halftime during the UT-Buffalo game. All three finalists will be given a key to the Jeep, with one lucky fan’s key starting the vehicle. For the chance to win, all entrants must be at the Oct. 20 game.

The Toledo Rocket Fan Jeep Giveaway contest is sponsored by Yark Chrysler-Jeep-Dodge-Ram, Bud Light and iHeart Media.

Varsity ‘T’ Hall of Fame to induct 2018 class

The University of Toledo Varsity ‘T’ Hall of Fame will induct nine former student-athletes Friday, Oct. 19, at the Hilton Garden Inn in Perrysburg.

Social hour for the event will begin at 6 p.m., and dinner will follow at 7 p.m. The class also will be introduced at halftime of the UT football game vs. Buffalo Saturday, Oct. 20.

Tickets for the Varsity ‘T’ Hall of Fame induction dinner are $45 or $360 for a table of eight and can be purchased by calling the Athletic Development Office at 419.530.5087.

The 2018 Varsity ‘T’ Hall of Fame inductees are:

Lurley Archambeau, football, 1963 to 1965. He was a three-year starter, playing in the first three years of legendary Rocket Coach Frank Lauterbur’s tenure. In his sophomore and junior seasons, Archambeau started on both the offensive and defensive lines, one of the last two-way players in UT history. He also played on all special teams, meaning he did not come off the field during games. As a senior, Archambeau was the starting center on a team that went 5-5. After graduation, Archambeau was drafted in the 17th round by the Atlanta Falcons, but an injury ended his football career. After graduation, he attended medical school and became the first president of the first class of the former Medical College of Ohio. He has been in private psychiatry practice in Toledo for the past 43 years and has served his alma mater as a counselor for Rocket student-athletes for four decades.

Andy Boyd, football, 1998 to 2001. He was a walk-on who became a four-year starter at safety. During his collegiate career, Boyd always seemed to make the big play in the biggest games. Boyd totaled 314 tackles and 10 interceptions. He made the Mid-American Conference Academic Honor Roll in 1999, 2000 and 2001. During his junior year in 2000, he also was named All-MAC by the Sporting News. Boyd also was named UT’s Most Outstanding Defensive back in 1999, 2000 and 2001. During Boyd’s time at UT, the Rockets had a 33-13 record (22-8 MAC) and won MAC West Division titles in 1998, 2000 and 2001. In Boyd’s senior year, the Rockets won the MAC Championship and 2001 Motor City Bowl. He had 76 tackles and three interceptions as a redshirt freshman in 1998, making the Football News’ First-Team Freshman All-American squad and Football News’ All-MAC First-Team. He also received the Norman Cohen award for UT’s Most Outstanding Freshman football player in 1998. His biggest play came in the fourth quarter with an interception against Central Michigan that set up the game-winning field goal to help Toledo take the MAC West Division title. Boyd had 61 tackles and three interceptions as a sophomore, and 95 tackles and three picks as a junior in 2000. That 2000 team went 10-1 and was one of the strongest defensive teams ever at UT, racking up three shutouts and holding opponents to 14 points or fewer in seven games. Boyd made the game-saving tackle on the final play in a 31-26 defeat of Tony Romo and Eastern Illinois that season. In 2001, Boyd was named a team captain. He had 82 tackles and one interception. He broke up the potential game-winning pass in the end zone on fourth down to clinch Toledo’s 23-16 victory over Cincinnati in the 2001 Motor City Bowl. After graduation, Boyd served the Rockets as a volunteer coach (2002), a graduate assistant coach (2003 to 2004), and assistant coach (2005 to 2009) and director of high school relations (2010). While on the coaching staff, Boyd recruited First-Team All-MAC players Barry Church, Archie Donald, Jermaine Robinson and Eric Page. Church and Page would go on to become All-Americans. Boyd went into private business in 2010 and returned to the program as color commentator on Rocket football broadcasts from 2011 to 2015.

Sean Dobson
, baseball, 2001 to 2004. He made First-Team All-MAC, First-Team All-Region and was named an All-American by College Baseball Insider.com in 2004. He hit .394 that season and set UT records for total bases (152), RBIs (63) and doubles (23), while also scoring 60 runs. He led the team in hitting in 2002 with a .387 average, knocking in 34 runs and scoring 33. In 2003, he hit .367 and led the team with 60 runs scored. Dobson finished his career as UT’s leader in runs, hits and doubles. He ranks second in batting average (.371), third in runs (159) and hits (249), fourth in total bases (356), tied for fourth in doubles (46), and seventh in RBI (131). An outfielder, Dobson was drafted by the St. Louis Cardinals in the 40th round of the 2004 Major League Baseball draft.

Ari Fisher, women’s track and field/cross country, 2008 to 2012. Fisher made All-MAC six times in her career as a distance runner, three times in cross country and three times in track and field. She is one of only five runners in MAC history to win back-to-back cross country titles, achieving that feat in 2009 and 2010. She qualified for the NCAA Cross Country Championship Meet three times in her career, earning All-America honors in 2010. Fisher won the individual title as a sophomore in 2009, pacing UT to a second-place finish. She then took ninth place at the NCAA Regionals and qualified for her first NCAA Championship Meet. A year later, she won the MAC title again, leading the Rockets to a MAC title. She was third at the NCAA Regionals and 26th at the NCAA Championship Meet. In 2011, Fisher came in third place at the MAC Championships as UT again won the team title. She was 17th at the NCAA Regionals and 76th at the NCAA Championship Meet, helping UT to its highest national finish ever (21st place). Injuries hampered her track career, but she was named the league’s Outstanding Distance Runner at the 2010 Indoor Championship when she won the 5K by more than 26 seconds. In 2011, she set the MAC record in the 5K at the Iowa State meet. Her time of 16:04.56 was one of the top 10 fastest times in the world that year. She was one of the favorites to win the 5K at the NCAA Indoor Championships that year, but an injury forced her to withdraw from the race. In 2012, she won the 10K at the MAC Outdoor Championships.

Laura Lindsay, women’s swimming and diving, 2008 to 2011. She was a two-time All-American and three-time All-MAC swimmer who helped lead Toledo to MAC Championships in 2010 and 2012. She earned All-America honors in the breaststroke in 2011 and 2012, the only Rocket woman swimmer to make All-America twice in her career. In 2012, Lindsay swam the fifth fastest time at the NCAA Championships in the 100-yard breaststroke, swimming in the B final and winning the event. She also swam the 200-yard breaststroke at the NCAA Championships twice, making her a four-time NCAA qualifier. Lindsay set three MAC records in the breaststroke and still holds two all-time UT individual records, as well as the MAC record in the 200 breast (2:09.72). Over her career, Lindsay won six MAC titles, one each in the 100 and 200 breaststroke, and four in medley relays. As a sophomore, Lindsay was part of the MAC Championship 200- and 400-medley relay teams, earning second-team all-conference. A year later, Lindsay finished in second place in both the 100- and 200-breaststroke, taking home First-Team All-MAC honors. As a senior, she won both of those races at the MAC Championships, as well as participating in the 200- and 400-medley relay teams that won league titles. Lindsay, who was named Toledo’s team MVP in 2011 and 2012, was a USA Olympic top 10 qualifier in the 100- and 200-breaststroke in 2012, and top 25 qualifier in 2016.

Jared Miller, men’s tennis, 2005 to 2009. He was a four-time All-MAC tennis player and three-time team captain during his collegiate career. His overall record was 128-108, including a 42-28 mark at No.1 singles and No. 1 doubles as a senior. He earned a spot on the All-MAC Tournament Team in 2008 and 2009. In his senior year, Miller helped lead the Rockets to the MAC Tournament title match, their best finish in 36 years, and was ranked No. 8 in doubles in the Midwest Region. Miller was a three-time Academic All-MAC choice and was twice named MAC Male Scholar-Athlete of the Week. In 2009, he earned the MAC Men’s Tennis Senior Sportsmanship Award and the Intercollegiate Tennis Association Division I Men’s Midwest Arthur Ashe Sportsmanship Award. Miller nabbed numerous team awards, including Newcomer of the Year (2005-06); Most Improved Player (2005-06 and 2006-07); Team Leadership Award (2006-07, 2007-08, 2008-09) and Most Valuable Player (all four years). In 2009, Miller was voted UT’s Most Valuable Male Senior by the UT Student-Athlete Advisory Committee. In 2009, he was honored for having the highest GPA among all UT male student-athletes. Miller graduated with a bachelor’s degree in chemistry with concentration in biochemistry. He went to medical school and works in general pediatrics and primary care sports medicine with St. Vincent Medical Group in Kokomo, Ind.

Eric Page, football, 2009 to 2011. Page’s 306 receptions are the most in Toledo history and the 12th most in NCAA history. He also leads Toledo with 3,446 receiving yards. He holds the single-season mark for catches, snagging 125 passes as a junior in 2011, and ranks first all-time in career kickoff return average (27.3). Page was a three-time All-MAC selection who earned first-team All-America honors as a kickoff returner in 2010, a year in which he averaged 31.1 yards per return and scored three TDs. In 2009, Page led the nation’s freshmen with 82 receptions and 1,159 receiving yards. He earned second-team All-MAC honors and was named a Freshman All-American by Phil Steele and College Football News. As a sophomore, Page caught 99 passes and was named First-Team All-MAC as both a receiver and kickoff returner. He was selected by Walter Camp and the Sporting News as a First-Team All-American at kickoff returner, the first Rocket to make first-team on a major All-America team since Gene Swick in 1975. He also was named MAC Special Teams Player of the Year and the National Kickoff Returner of the Year by College Football Performance Awards. In his junior season, Page became only the third person in NCAA Football Bowl Subdivision history to make First-Team All-League at three positions: wide receiver, kickoff returner and punt returner. He shattered the UT reception mark by catching 125 passes and was one of four national finalists for the Paul Hornung Award, given annually to the nation’s most versatile player. He set the UT record and tied Randy Moss’ MAC record when he caught five TD passes in one game vs. Northern Illinois in 2011. At the end of his college career, he was tied for the most career receptions by any player in MAC history.

Lena Richards-Crider, softball, 1995 to 1996. She is a two-time First-Team All-MAC selection. As a junior in 1995, she led the Rockets in nine categories: slugging percentage (.439), runs (40), hits, (69), at-bats (212 — which ties for fifth place in MAC history), doubles (13), sacrifices (18), total bases (93), stolen bases (12) and home runs (3). These impressive season stats helped her earn a spot on the First-Team All-MAC and First-Team All-Mideast Region lists. She was the MAC’s Hitter of the Week and was nominated for National Hitter of the Week after batting .600 (12 for 20) with seven RBI, four runs scored, three sacrifices, two doubles, and a grand slam over six games against No. 6 Michigan and Eastern Michigan (1995). She also pitched an 8-0 shutout over Eastern Michigan during that same stretch. In 1996, Richards-Crider made First-Team All-MAC again. She was named MAC Co-Hitter of the Week April 15 after hitting .692 (9 for 13) with two runs, one double, and a pair of stolen bases. Richards-Crider is vice president of development and marketing for A Kid Again, a nonprofit organization in Columbus, Ohio, that works to foster hope, happiness and healing for families raising children with life-threatening illnesses.

Naama Shafir, women’s basketball, 2008 to 2013. She was a four-time All-MAC selection and is one of only two players (Kim Knuth) in program history to earn all-conference accolades on four occasions. Shafir wrapped up her collegiate career ranked first in UT annals in assists (722, third most in MAC history), minutes played (4,218), games played (139) and games started (139). She also ranked second in free-throw attempts (696), third in steals (227) and made free throws (538), fourth in field-goal attempts (1,476), and fifth in points (1,874). Additionally, Shafir was sixth in field goals made (601), seventh in free-throw percentage (.773), and tied for ninth in scoring average (13.5 points per game). As a freshman, Shafir averaged 11.7 points and 4.5 assists, earning honorable mention All-MAC honors. A year later, she earned second-team all-league honors, averaging 14.3 points and 6.7 assists, leading UT to the MAC Championship title game for the first time since 2001. As a junior in the 2010-11 season, Shafir averaged 15.3 points and 5.1 assists, earning First-Team All-MAC honors. The Rockets finished in first place in the MAC that year and went on to win the WNIT Championship. She was named MVP of the tournament, scoring 40 points against USC in the championship game, a 76-68 Rocket victory before a record crowd in Savage Arena. Shafir played in only four games in 2011-12 due to a knee injury, but came back in 2012-13 to lead UT to a 29-4 record (15-1 MAC). She once again earned First-Team All-MAC honors, averaging 12.8 points and 4.6 assists. She was runner-up for MAC Player of the Year and a regional finalist for the Women’s Basketball Coaches Association’s All-America Team. An excellent student, Shafir earned Academic All-MAC honors three times. She was part of the winningest class in school history, helping UT post a 107-31 overall ledger and a 54-10 MAC mark, with two MAC regular-season titles (2010-11, 2012-13), and four-consecutive MAC West-Division crowns, as well as advancing to the postseason each year. After graduation, Shafir returned to her native Israel, where she has played professional basketball for Elitzur Ramla, Maccabi Ramat Hen and Maccabi Bnot Ashdod.

Day of Giving events Oct. 16 and 17

Get ready and get involved: UT’s annual Day of Giving is this week.

The fundraising campaign, Rocket Forward: You Launch Lives, will begin at midnight Tuesday, Oct. 16, and will last until noon Wednesday, Oct. 17.

Alumni, faculty and staff members, students, and friends of the University who support its mission are encouraged to give during this second annual Day of Giving. Go to rocketforward.utoledo.edu.

And check out some of the events taking place Tuesday, Oct. 16:

• Meet and Greet with the President from 8 to 9 a.m. in the Collier Building. Dr. Sharon L. Gaber will meet students, pose for selfies, and pass out doughnuts and apples.

• Fall Fest from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Law Center. Donate to decorate mini-pumpkins and mugs; play cornhole, ring toss and horseshoes; and eat kettle corn, caramel apples and cider.

• Day of Giving Carnival from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Centennial Mall. Stop by for games, food trucks and the dog-petting station. Participants can donate dollars for coins to play games, at which they can earn tickets for prizes; donations may be made with cash, credit cards and Rocket dollars. It’s $1 to pet a pup!

• Taco Tuesday from noon to 2 p.m. in Rocket Hall. Donations will be accepted for lunch at this event sponsored by University College.

• Zumba Class at 8 p.m. between Ottawa East and Ottawa West. Donate to attend the class.

From 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. Wednesday, Oct. 17, stop by Rocket Hall Room 1300 and pick up a bagel or doughnut for a donation.

For a complete list of events, go to utfoundation.org/rocketforward/events.html.

Every donor and every dollar will make a difference in this 36-hour campaign to raise money for student scholarships, athletic and educational programs, and resources for UT’s academic colleges, among many other areas.

Gifts to rocketforward.utoledo.edu during the Day of Giving can be designated to specific funds that support causes donors are passionate about, and there are more than 2,000 funds to support.

Toledo to hold women’s basketball tipoff event Oct. 23

Toledo will hold a Women’s Basketball Tipoff Event Tuesday, Oct. 23, at 6:30 p.m. in the Thompson Student Union Auditorium.

The cost for the annual fundraiser hosted by the Rockets is $55 per person, $100 per couple, and $10 per child age 12 and younger. All proceeds will go to the UT women’s basketball program.

Attendees also can reserve an eight-person table for $500 or purchase the MVP package for $1,000, which includes a reserved table for eight and a signed Toledo basketball.

Attendees will be treated to live music and food donated by local restaurants while vying for numerous prizes throughout the course of the event.

“We want to let fans know the name of this year’s fundraiser has changed from Cake, Rattle and Roll to Toledo Women’s Basketball Tipoff because of the outstanding support for our program,” Head Coach Tricia Cullop said. “Since it has become so big, it’s tough to manage the size of a cake walk. Don’t worry, though, it will still be a fun-filled night with music, prizes, and a chance to get to know our players.”

In addition to music and prizes, this year’s event will feature current Women’s National Basketball Association Seattle Storm Head Coach Dan Hughes. A two-time WNBA Coach of the Year, Hughes also served as an assistant coach for the UT women’s program in 1996-97, as well as on the UT men’s squad from 1991 to 1996.

The Storm last month won their third WNBA Championship in franchise history with a three-game sweep over the Washington Mystics.

“We’ve once again landed one of the top coaches in the WNBA as our featured speaker,” Cullop said. “Dan Hughes, a former women’s and men’s assistant coach at Toledo, has agreed to join us this year, and we couldn’t be more excited.”

For more information or to reserve your spot/table for the event, contact Lauren Flaum, director of women’s basketball operations, at 419.530.2363 or lauren.flaum2@utoledo.edu. RSVPs are requested by Thursday, Oct. 18.