UT News » Library

UT News

Categories

Search News

Archives

Resources

Library

Plaza between union, library to close for construction

The plaza between the Thompson Student Union and Carlson Library will close Monday, June 5.

It is scheduled to remain closed through Friday, Aug. 11.

All entrances leading to the plaza will be closed.

The closure is necessary, in part, as a glass curtain wall is being installed on the east side of library this summer. The $3 million project is made possible by state biennium capital funds.

In addition, new steam and condensate lines are being installed on the west end of the plaza, according to Chris Levicki, manager of structural maintenance in Facilities and Construction.

North entrance of Carlson Library closed for construction

Visitors to Carlson Library will have to use the south entrance this summer.

Due to construction, the north entrance across from the Thompson Student Union closed Monday, May 8.

The north entrance is scheduled to reopen Friday, Aug. 11, according to Chris Levicki, manager of structural maintenance in Facilities and Construction.

A glass curtain wall will be installed on the east side of library this summer. The $3 million project is made possible by state biennium capital funds.

Workers from Mosser Construction Inc. in Maumee are using an 80-foot, 50-ton crane to remove masonry on Carlson Library.

Workers from Mosser Construction Inc. in Maumee used an 80-foot, 50-ton crane to begin masonry removal on Carlson Library.

Finalists for dean of University Libraries coming to campus

Two candidates for dean of University Libraries will visit campus this week for open forums with the UT community.

Beau David Case, head of arts and humanities at the University of Michigan Library, will be at UT Thursday, May 4.

An open forum for faculty and staff on Main Campus will be held from 8:55 to 9:45 a.m. in Carlson Library Room 1005. And a forum for faculty and staff on Health Science Campus will take place from 2 to 2:30 p.m. in Mulford Library Room 420.

Dr. Marwin Britto, professor and librarian at the University of Saskatchewan Library in Saskatoon, will visit UT Friday, May 5.

An open forum for faculty and staff on Main Campus will be held from 9:40 to 10:30 a.m. in Carlson Library Room 1005. And a forum for faculty and staff on Health Science Campus will take place from 4 to 4:30 p.m. in Mulford Library Room 420.

Reporting to the provost and executive vice president for academic affairs, the dean will lead the University Libraries: Carlson Library, Mulford Library, McMaster Engineering Library and the Canaday Center for Special Collections. The position also works closely with the University’s LaValley Law Library. In addition, the dean serves as the chief academic and administrative officer for the University Libraries and oversees The University of Toledo Press.

For more information about the dean search and to see the candidates’ curriculum vitaes, visit utoledo.edu/offices/provost/search-dean-university-libraries.

University Libraries receives largest gift to date

The University of Toledo Libraries has received a bequest of $500,000 from the estate of Dorothy MacKenzie Price. It is the largest gift in the libraries’ history.

The donation will provide an endowment to support a model classroom in Carlson Library and staffing in the Ward M. Canaday Center for Special Collections.

Dorothy MacKenzie Price, shown here seated by Vern Snyder, former UT vice president for institutional advancement, gave a bequest of $500,000 from her estate to University Libraries.

Price, a UT alumna and supporter of many University programs, died in 2016. She provided the funds in her will to create a state-of-the-art classroom in the library. The model classroom is part of the current renovations underway on the second floor of Carlson Library. The classroom will be used as a space for instructing students on how to access and use both basic and advanced library resources.

“This room will be instrumental in helping us introduce students to college-level research, especially in how to use the many electronic resources we have available in the library,” Barbara Floyd, interim director of University Libraries, said.

Floyd added the technology will connect UT students to the resources, and librarians will provide instruction on how to best utilize these resources in the research they are completing for their classes.

“Students who know how to use the library effectively are more successful in their academic careers,” she said.

Dr. Andrew Hsu, provost and executive president for academic affairs, added, “The library is central to student life and student success, and this gift will further enhance our libraries’ ability to serve our students.”

In addition to $100,000 to support the classroom, an additional $400,000 will serve as an endowment to support staffing in the Canaday Center. The center houses more than 15,000 feet of unique manuscripts and archival material, and 30,000 rare books.

“Organizing, preserving and making available special collections materials is labor-intensive,” Floyd said. “To have additional funding to help provide the staff to complete this work will allow us to more effectively serve our patrons — some of whom travel to the center from around to world to use our collections.”

The Canaday Center is responsible for collecting personal papers and organizational records that primarily focus on documenting the history of Toledo and northwest Ohio. Among the center’s most important collections are records documenting the history of the glass industry in Toledo, which includes 1,000 linear feet of materials from Toledo’s glass corporations.

The center also is one of the national leaders in collecting materials that document the history of people with disabilities. These include many local organizations such as the Ability Center of Toledo, Bittersweet Farms, and the now-defunct Toledo Hearing and Speech Center, as well as collections that document disability history nationally.

“These funds from Dorothy MacKenzie Price will be instrumental in helping us to continue our mission of preserving rare and unique materials and making them available to researchers,” Floyd said.

Toledo Section of American Chemical Society celebrates 100th anniversary

The Toledo Local Section of the American Chemical Society will celebrate its 100th anniversary Thursday, April 27, with a talk by Barbara Floyd, interim director of University Libraries, on her book “The Glass City: Toledo and the Industry That Built It.”

The book talk, part of the Toledo-Lucas County Public Library’s Open Book Program, will take place at 6 p.m. in McMaster Auditorium of the Toledo main library downtown.

Barbara Floyd will discuss her book, “The Glass City: Toledo and the Industry That Built It,” Thursday, April 27, at 6 p.m. in the Toledo-Lucas County Public Library McMaster Auditorium in downtown.

Floyd’s book, which chronicles the history of Toledo’s most important industry, was published by the University of Michigan Press. It was the winner of the Bowling Green State University’s Center for Archival Collection Local History Publication Award for the best book in the academic scholar category for 2015.

The Toledo Section of the American Chemical Society was founded by members of the UT Department of Chemistry faculty in 1917. The Toledo group is one of 187 local sections of the organization. The society’s mission is “to advance the broader chemistry enterprise and its practitioners for the benefit of Earth and its people.”

According to Joanna Hinton, past chair of the Toledo section, the group will hold events throughout the year in what it is calling its “Chem-tennial 2017.”

The talk at the library will include the presentation of awards to American Chemical Society members for their service.

Floyd, who is also director of the Ward M. Canaday Center for Special Collections, will sign copies of her book, which will be available for sale, after the talk.

For more information on the free, public talk, contact Hinton at 419.346.8876 or visit http://toledosection.sites.acs.org.

Events set for National Library Week

University Libraries has scheduled several events to celebrate National Library Week, April 9-15.

“Libraries Transform” returns as the theme again this year.

“National Library Week is a chance for people to remember and celebrate the role libraries play in transforming lives,” Barbara Floyd, interim director of University Libraries, said. “We hope UT community members will visit the library this week, attend one of our fun or cultural events, and reflect on the way libraries have changed their lives as students, as researchers and as citizens.”

Since 1958, National Library Week has been sponsored by the American Library Association and observed by libraries across the country.

A book sale will be held in the Carlson Library Concourse Monday through Thursday, April 10-13, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. A wide selection of books will be available; topics include business, social sciences, sciences, children’s literature and popular titles. Prices will be 50 cents a book, or $5 a bag, and sales will be cash only. All proceeds raised will benefit the library. For more information about the sale, contact jessica.morales@utoledo.edu.

Listed by date, events hosted by University Libraries will be:

• Monday, April 10 — Author Amy Haimerl will talk about her experience in preserving a home in Detroit that she chronicled in her book “Detroit Hustle: A Memoir of Love, Life, and Home” (Running Press, 2016) at 3:30 p.m. in the Ward M. Canaday Center for Special Collections. This talk is in conjunction with the Canaday Center’s exhibit, “House and Home: The Intersection of Domestic Architecture and Social History, 1870-1970,” which is display through May 5.

• Tuesday, April 11 — Library Scavenger Hunt, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Carlson Library. Meet at the reference desk on the first floor.

• Wednesday, April 12 — Write-In, noon to 5 p.m., Writing Center, located in the Carlson Library basement. Walk in and receive assistance from writing tutors and librarians.

• Thursday, April 13 — BASH Game Night, 6 p.m., Carlson Library second floor. Stop by to play board, card and video games.

• Friday, April 14 — Poetry Slam, 6 p.m., Carlson Library Room 1005. There will be featured readers from Toledo Poet and DEEP (Developing, Enhancing and Empowering Poets), and anyone is invited to share his or her work at the open mic.

For more information about these events, visit libguides.utoledo.edu/nlw, or contact Jonathan DaSo at 419.530.2019 or jonathan.daso@utoledo.edu.

Canaday Center’s spring lectures look at historic preservation, communities

How do efforts to preserve historic homes affect the communities where these homes are located?

Two upcoming lectures will attempt to answer this question from the perspective of someone who has worked for 45 years in the historic preservation field, and someone who has personally committed to preserving one historic home.

The lectures are part of the Canaday Center’s exhibit titled “House and Home: The Intersection of Domestic Architecture and Social History, 1870-1970,” which is on display through May 5.

The talks are being held in conjunction with the Ward M. Canaday Center for Special Collections’ exhibit, “House and Home: The Intersection of Domestic Architecture and Social History, 1870-1970.”

Dr. Ted Ligibel, director of the Historic Preservation Program at Eastern Michigan University, will present a lecture titled “From Frontier to Mid-Century Modern: 45 Years of Historic Preservation in Northwest Ohio,” Wednesday, March 29, at 3:30 p.m. in the Canaday Center.

Ligibel’s career in historic preservation began in 1974 in Toledo as a grassroots preservationist. As an associate in UT’s Urban Affairs Center, he led students in efforts to inventory Toledo’s neighborhoods and prepare nominations for the National Register of Historic Places.

In 1991, Ligibel joined the EMU faculty, and he became director of its graduate Historic Preservation Program in 1999. He is the co-author of “Historic Preservation: An Introduction to its History, Principles, and Practice,” published in 2009, which has become the national best-selling textbook in the field.

Ligibel will discuss his long career in this field, and successful and unsuccessful efforts to save historic homes and communities in northwest Ohio.

Haimerl

Author Amy Haimerl will talk about her experience in preserving a home in Detroit that she chronicled in her book “Detroit Hustle: A Memoir of Love, Life, and Home” (Running Press, 2016) Monday, April 10, at 3:30 p.m. in the Canaday Center.

Haimerl purchased her home — a 1914 Georgian Revival located in what was once one of Detroit’s premier neighborhoods — for $35,000. The home had no plumbing, no heat and no electricity. She and her husband believed it could be renovated for less than $100,000. Years later, after overcoming many roadblocks and weathering Detroit’s municipal bankruptcy, the couple has invested more than $300,000 in saving their home.

Her book is more than just a story of one couple’s effort to save a home. It is also a story of finding their place in a thriving community.

Haimerl is an adjunct professor of journalism at Michigan State University and a freelance journalist who writes on aspects of business and finance. Not only did she live through Detroit’s bankruptcy, but she helped to cover the story for Crain’s Detroit Business.

She will sign copies of her book at the lecture. Her talk is part of University Libraries’ celebration of National Library Week.

“House and Home: The Intersection of Domestic Architecture and Social History, 1870-1970,” is an exhibit on display in the Canaday Center through May 5.

For more information on the free, public exhibit or lectures, contact Barbara Floyd, director of the Canaday Center and interim director of University Libraries, at 419.530.2170.

Former Ohio Supreme Court Justice donates papers to UT

Former Ohio Supreme Court Justice and Toledo native Judith Ann Lanzinger recently donated her personal papers to the Ward M. Canaday Center for Special Collections at The University of Toledo.

Lanzinger, who is the only person ever elected to all four levels of Ohio’s judiciary, retired from the state’s highest court in 2016.

Former Ohio Supreme Court Justice and UT law alumna Judith Ann Lanzinger, second from left, recently donated her personal papers to the Ward M. Canaday Center for Special Collections. She posed for a photo with, from left, Lauren White, manuscripts librarian and lecturer; D. Benjamin Barros, dean of the College of Law; and Barbara Floyd, director of the Canaday Center and interim director of University Libraries, who propped up a 2007 portrait of justices from the Supreme Court of Ohio.

During her long career, she also served on the 6th District Court of Appeals, the Lucas County Court of Common Pleas and the Toledo Municipal Court.

The Canaday Center, the special collections department of the UT Libraries, has long collected manuscript materials related to the history of women in northwest Ohio. Noteworthy collections include the papers of educators, politicians and activists such as Linda Furney, Betty Mauk, Betty Morais, Mary Boyle Burns, Ella P. Stewart and Olive Colton. The center recently has begun collaborating with the College of Law to preserve the history of Toledo’s women lawyers and judges.

“We are delighted to help ensure this important history is accessible to future scholars and citizens,” said D. Benjamin Barros, dean of the College of Law.

As part of this collaboration with the College of Law, the center also recently acquired a collection of scrapbooks documenting the career of Geraldine Macelwane, the first woman elected judge of the Toledo Municipal Court (appointed in 1952) and the first woman judge of the Lucas County Common Pleas Court (appointed in 1956). She died in 1974.

“Justice Lanzinger is one of our most distinguished alumni, having notably served at all levels of the Ohio judiciary. We are honored that the University is able to house her papers, which we hope will encourage and inspire others to civic engagement,” Barros said.

The Lanzinger collection contains photographs, awards and research files documenting her judicial career. Of particular note are the former justice’s case notes that provide insight into her thoughts and opinions as they developed during trials.

“This collection will provide a rich source of information on many aspects of Justice Lanzinger’s career,” said Barbara Floyd, director of the Canaday Center and interim director of University Libraries. “We hope to continue to collect and preserve the papers of other women lawyers and judges from this area to add to these collections.”

Lanzinger said, “I am honored that the Ward M. Canaday Center has accepted these documents that represent my 31 years of service at all levels of Ohio’s judiciary. I hope they may be of help in future academic projects at The University of Toledo, my alma mater.”

For more information on the collection, contact Floyd at 419.530.2170.

UT to host series of events examining life on autism spectrum

The University of Toledo Libraries in partnership with Student Disability Services and the UT Disability Studies Program is shining the spotlight on adult autism through a monthlong program of free, public events beginning Thursday, March 16, ahead of Autism Awareness Month in April.

UT teamed up with Bittersweet Farms and the Autism Society of Northwest Ohio to focus on challenges adults diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder face as they transition out of high school and into the community, including housing, employment, health care, transportation, financial management, and social and leisure supports.

“Life on the Autism Spectrum: Home and Community” features a four-part lecture series, an art show of works created by adults with autism, and a fundraiser.

“University Libraries is excited to continue our work with organizations assisting those on the autism spectrum in northwest Ohio,” said Barbara Floyd, interim director of University Libraries and director of the Canaday Center for Special Collections. “The Canaday Center has worked with both Bittersweet Farms and the Autism Society of Northwest Ohio for more than a decade to collect, preserve and make available the records that document the history of these two groups. The records of these two organizations are part of a larger effort by the Canaday Center to document the lives of people with disabilities in our community.”

More than 3.5 million Americans are diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder.

“The autism spectrum is large,” Jessica Morales, UT assistant professor and collection management librarian, said. “We want to raise understanding, empathy and patience.”

According to local experts, research on autism and the development of services and support have largely focused on children, and people with autism have the lowest employment rate of all disability groups.

“As the prevalence of autism has increased and the population has aged, communities and governments are beginning to look at the needs of older adults on the autism spectrum,” said Linell Weinberg, executive director of the Autism Society of Northwest Ohio. “Housing will be an issue for individuals as they age. Some individuals can live on their own, but many will need some level of support.”

“My stepson, Ben, is 33 years old, but his functional intelligence is around the age of 7 or 8,” said Thomas Atwood, UT associate professor and coordinator of information literacy and library instruction. “He is very sweet, but doesn’t have the critical thinking skills to make rational decisions to keep himself safe. This is a very vulnerable population who often cannot speak for themselves and feel trapped on the inside.”

Ben DeVorss, who is one of the speakers in the lecture series, lives at Bittersweet Farms located on 80 acres of fields, pastures, gardens and woods in Whitehouse, Ohio. It’s renowned for redefining what is possible by creating and providing services for adults with autism that allow them to find meaning and dignity in the activities they do. Bittersweet’s agriculture, art and culinary programs produce products that are sold in the community.

“We provide self-paced, distraction-free activities, such as planting, harvesting, art education, animal care, grounds keeping, vocation and therapy, that participants perceive as meaningful work and feel a reinforced sense of dignity and worth,” said Vicki Obee, executive director of Bittersweet Farms. “We are thrilled that UT’s Carlson Library is sharing Bittersweet’s story and the story of adults with autism in northwest Ohio. We hope that our community — through the artwork, artifacts and lecture — will see the amazing spirit and beauty of those we serve at Bittersweet.”

“We have roughly 30 students at UT with autism who are registered with Student Disability Services, and there are likely more on campus,” Enjie Hall, director of campus accessibility and student disability services, said. “The difficulty is that many students choose not to register or do not know to affiliate with Student Disability Services, so it is hard to get an accurate count of students with autism at UT. We are committed to removing barriers and strive for full inclusion; therefore, universal design will help all students whether they are registered with Student Disability Services or not.”

Events in the monthlong adult autism programming will include:

Thursday, March 16

• Bittersweet Farms lecture by executive director Vicki Obee, board member Jane Atwood and resident Ben DeVorss titled “Neurodiversity and Community Synergies: The Efficacy of Bittersweet Farms and Preserving a Spectrum of Choices for Adults With Autism,” from 7 to 9 p.m. on the fifth floor of Carlson Library.

• Bittersweet Farms fundraiser featuring artwork and crafts created by Bittersweet residents, from 5 to 9 p.m. on the first floor concourse of Carlson Library.

Wednesday, March 22

• Lecture by Linell Weinburg, executive director of the Northwest Ohio Autism Society, and Kristy Rothe, chair of the Family Advisory Council at ProMedica Toledo Children’s Hospital, titled “Creating a Compassionate Community: A Dialogue for Autism,” from noon to 1 p.m. in Carlson Library Room 1005.

Thursday, March 30

Lecture by Enjie Hall, UT director of campus accessibility and student disability services, and Dr. Jim Ferris, UT professor and Ability Center Endowed Chair in Disability Studies, titled “Autism, Culture and Higher Education,” 11 a.m. in Carlson Library Room 1005.

Thursday, April 6

• Two visiting scholars, who are professors with autism, will give a lecture titled “Autistic People Speak Back: A Conversation With Professors Ibby Grace and Melanie Yergeau.” Dr. Melanie Yergeau, assistant professor of English at the University of Michigan, and Dr. Elizabeth Grace, assistant professor of education at National Louis University, will speak from 3:30 to 5 p.m. in Carlson Library Room 1005.

An exhibit of Bittersweet artwork, artifacts, photos and murals will be on display from Sunday, March 12, through Thursday, April 6, on the fifth floor of Carlson Library. Library materials relevant to the series of lecture topics also will be on display during that same period.

“The library is the perfect place to start an important dialogue about the wide range and abilities of persons from the entire spectrum of autism disorders and take an in-depth look at resources and services available to help them live independently, whether it be through employment, higher education or support programs,” David Remaklus, director of operations at Carlson Library, said.

Library renovations to include new veterans lounge named for UT alumnus

The second phase of renovations underway at Carlson Library will include a new veterans lounge, a glass wall spanning several stories allowing for more natural light, and an expanded concourse when you enter the building.

The $3 million renovations funded by state capital dollars will focus on the first and second floors of the library. The renovations, which are expected to be completed prior to the start of fall semester, follow the work on the third and fourth floors finished last year that included the creation of more than 20 new group study rooms and new paint, carpet, ceilings and lighting to transform the learning space.

This rendering shows what the Lt. Col. Thomas J. Orlowski ’65 Veterans Lounge may look like when finished on the second floor of Carlson Library this summer.

This rendering shows what the Lt. Col. Thomas J. Orlowski ’65 Veterans Lounge may look like when finished on the second floor of Carlson Library this summer.

“The south side of the second floor will be renovated to include group study rooms and study carrels like those that have become popular on the recently completed third and fourth floors,” said Barbara Floyd, interim director of University Libraries. “We recently conducted a survey asking students if they were satisfied with the renovations done, and the comments were overwhelmingly positive, with many students crediting the renovations with their success in the classroom.”

The second floor of the library also will be the new home for the University’s Veterans Lounge, which will relocate from its current location in Rocket Hall.

“Our student veterans were interested in a more centrally located space and in this academic setting they also will have better access to library resources for research and homework with longer hours to take advantage of the lounge,” said Navy Reserve Lt. Haraz Ghanbari, UT director of military and veteran affairs.

Lt. Col. Thomas Orlowski spoke after being recognized by the Coalition to Salute America’s Heroes with its Hometown Hero Award and the news that the veterans lounge at his alma mater will be named in his honor. Orlowski, who graduated from UT in 1965 before his 20-year career in the U.S. Army, is being recognized with the naming of the Lt. Col. Thomas J. Orlowski ’65 Veterans Lounge that will be relocated to the second floor of Carlson Library.

Lt. Col. Thomas Orlowski spoke after being recognized by the Coalition to Salute America’s Heroes with its Hometown Hero Award and the news that the veterans lounge at his alma mater will be named in his honor. Orlowski, who graduated from UT in 1965 before his 20-year career in the U.S. Army, is being recognized with the naming of the Lt. Col. Thomas J. Orlowski ’65 Veterans Lounge that will be relocated to the second floor of Carlson Library.

A $20,000 donation from the Coalition to Salute America’s Heroes supports the creation of the new lounge, which also will be larger with a separate social area and private study section.

The coalition’s gift was made in recognition of Lt. Col. Thomas J. Orlowski, a UT alumnus and Army veteran who is the immediate past chairman of the organization’s board. The lounge will be named the Lt. Col. Thomas J. Orlowski ’65 Veterans Lounge in his honor.

“It’s a fantastic idea, and I’m proud of the University for doing it. I’m just very humbled to be honored as part of the project,” Orlowski said. “The exchanges that will occur in this lounge will start with, ‘What are you studying and with what professors?’ But after that familiarity builds up, then the war stories come up. It will definitely help veteran students academically, but a secondary benefit that people may not realize is the camaraderie of others who have been where you’ve been and done what you’ve done.”

Orlowski graduated from UT in 1965 with a degree in English literature, and he also was a middle linebacker for the football team. He joined the Army later that year, and his 20-year military career included assignments in the 1st Infantry Division in Vietnam, 5th Infantry Division (Mechanized), HQ U.S. Army Europe, HQ U.S. Continental Army Command and the Office of the Adjutant General of the Army. For his service in Vietnam, he was awarded the Purple Heart, Silver Star, Bronze Star for Valor with two Oak Leaf Clusters and Air Medal.

The new Veterans Lounge is expected to open in early summer.

Library renovations will continue through the summer, with the addition of a glass wall on the east side spanning the height of the building that will open up the library with more sunlight. The staircase from the first to second floors also will be redesigned with a mezzanine area on the second floor further opening up the space.

The separate hallway that you currently pass through when walking into the library will be removed so that guests will immediately be in the lobby when they walk in from outside. The redesign also will bring all of the library’s patron services — including circulation, reference and instruction — to the first floor. The information technology help desk recently moved from the back of the floor to share space with the circulation desk at the front.