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Northwest Ohio students to experience medical school at CampMed

Teenagers today and potential physicians tomorrow will learn the tools of the trade and practice their clinical skills at the 20th annual CampMed program at The University of Toledo.

The two-day CampMed program will be held Thursday and Friday, June 15 and 16, on Health Science Campus.

The 2017 class has 39 incoming freshman high school students from across northwest Ohio who will get a sampling of medical school by participating in hands-on lessons such as learning to dress for the operating room and suturing wounds.

“It’s imperative to reach out to young people early to nurture their interests in science and discovery. Their dreams for the future, which for some might include becoming a doctor, are attainable, and we want to show them there are people who want to help,” said Courtney K. Combs, director of the UT and Ohio Area Health Education Center programs.

“CampMed gives students the opportunity to learn firsthand what it’s like to be in the medical field before they even start high school. The participants really enjoy learning from current students in the UT College of Medicine and Life Sciences.”

CampMed is a scholarship program at no cost to the students, most of whom are first-generation college students and other underrepresented groups. The camp is sponsored by the UT Area Health Education Center program, which along with other programs throughout the country, strives to improve the health of individuals and communities by developing the health-care workforce. First- and second-year UT medical students serve as camp counselors, and the campers also will interact with physicians and faculty members.

The students will begin Thursday morning after the welcoming ceremonies with a tools of the trade session where they will learn to use medical instruments such as blood pressure cuffs and stethoscopes. Lessons will continue for two days with opportunities to tour a gross anatomy lab, make a cast and more.

CampMed, which began in 1998, is a competitive program that requires students to submit a letter of recommendation, a nomination from a science or math teacher or counselor, and a personal essay to be chosen to participate.

UTMC to celebrate cancer survivors with reception June 8

In honor of June being National Cancer Survivor Month, the Eleanor N. Dana Cancer Center at The University of Toledo is honoring cancer survivors with a celebration reception Thursday, June 8. 

Registration will begin at 5:30 p.m., and the free program will start at 6:10 p.m. Each cancer survivor can bring a guest. 

“Every year of survivorship is a reason for joy,” said Renee Schick, manager of the UTMC Survivor Shop and cancer survivor. “We believe it is important to celebrate all cancer survivors and their unique experiences, as well as provide continued support and connect them to community resources available as they continue their journey.” 

The celebration will bring together survivors to share their stories and introduce various community services and organizations. The event will feature door prizes and music. Food and beverages will be served. 

Guests also will have the opportunity to have their photo taken with Porshia, UTMC’s therapy dog. 

Register by calling 419.383.5243 or email eleanorndanacancercenter@utoledo.edu.

Public invited to skin cancer awareness event at UTMC

One in five Americans will be affected by skin cancer in their lifetime, and ultraviolent radiation from the sun is mainly to blame.

UV damage also can cause wrinkles and blotches or spots on your skin.

In honor of May being Melanoma/Skin Cancer Detection and Prevention Month, the
Eleanor N. Dana Cancer Center at The University of Toledo is hosting a program on skin cancer awareness and treatment.

The free, public event will take place Thursday, May 25, at 6 p.m. at the Eleanor N. Dana Cancer Center on Health Science Campus.

Nina Rettig, a physician assistant with the UTMC Dermatology Department, will
discuss simple steps to prevent skin cancer, how to monitor changes in your skin that might lead to skin cancer, and treatment.

“The good news is that risk of developing skin cancer can be minimized,” Rettig said. “And with awareness and early detection, it can often be cured.”

To register, call 419.383.5243.

Sign up for UT team to make strides toward cancer research

Join thousands of others by taking to the streets Saturday, May 6, for the 11th annual Making Strides Against Breast Cancer walk to help the American Cancer Society end the pain and suffering of those with breast cancer.

The 5K walk will take place at the Town Center at Levis Commons in Perrysburg. Registration will open at 8 a.m. with the walk beginning at 9:30 a.m.

Before the walk, an opening ceremony will take place to help inspire participants to take action as well as to symbolize the uplifting and energizing commitment people have made in making sure that no one has to face breast cancer alone.

“This event is important to the community and the breast cancer survivors and families. Not only does it bring awareness, but the funds generated from this walk benefit research, and free events for patients undergoing treatments, programs on educating the public to prevent it, catch it early and treat it,” said Michelle Giovanoli, manager of radiation oncology at UT Medical Center. “Their goal is to create a world without pain and suffering of breast cancer.”

Last year, more than 5,000 participants raised more than $130,000 for cancer research. The money raised was able to support programs to fight breast cancer in areas such as research, education, advocacy and patient services.

So far this year, 1,600 participants have raised more than $154,000.

Giovanoli serves as a co-chair for the event, but also has a deeper connection to the walk as she herself is a two-year breast cancer survivor.

“My mom and my aunt both were diagnosed and are survivors; my best friend is as well. I am sad to say that my sister-in-law died of the disease when she was in her 40s,” Giovanoli said. “I want people to know they are not forgotten; we walk in support of those who have survived as well as those who have passed from their disease.”

The walk also will honor Renee Schick, manager of Renee’s Survivor Shop in the Eleanor N. Dana Cancer Center, as this year’s honorary survivor. She is celebrating 16 years as a breast cancer survivor.

A limited number of T-shirts will be available at the event for $20. Parking will be free at the Town Center at Levis Common. The parking lots on the back side of the mall also will be available for participants.

The University of Toledo has a team called Rocket to a Cure, and people are encouraged to register for it. Rocky and Rocksy also will be in attendance.

The walk is family-friendly, and there is no registration fee to sign up. Participants are encouraged to fundraise or donate, but are not required.

UT Health will sponsor a photo booth for Making Strides Against Breast Cancer.

To sign up for the event or to donate, click here.

UT Medical Center recognized as national leader in LGBTQA+ health care equality

The University of Toledo Medical Center has been recognized as a 2017 “Leader in LGBTQ Healthcare Equality” by the Human Rights Campaign Foundation for its commitment to the equal treatment of all lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning patients.

“We want all of our patients at The University of Toledo Medical Center to be in an environment that is welcoming and supports the overall healing and recovery process,” Dan Barbee, chief executive officer of UTMC, said. “To achieve this, we believe that patients, their families and loved ones need to be in a nonjudgmental setting that promotes acceptance and allows a person to feel safe and protected to be their true self.”

UTMC is the only medical facility in northwest Ohio to earn this distinction and one of only 302 nationwide.

The designation was recently reported in the 10th edition of the Healthcare Equality Index, reflecting on a decade of progress in LGBTQA+ health care.

The Healthcare Equality Index is sponsored by the Human Rights Campaign, America’s largest civil rights organization working to achieve LGBTQA+ equality. The annual survey consists of questions that determine whether a hospital meets the core requirements to become a leader.

A record 590 health-care facilities actively participated in the 2017 survey. In addition to active survey participants, the Human Rights Campaign Foundation proactively researched key policies at more than 900 nonparticipating hospitals. Of all those included in the index, 302 earned a “Leader in LGBTQ Healthcare Equality” designation.

UT Medical Center opens new Inpatient Detox Unit

The University of Toledo Medical Center is accepting patients to its new Adult Detoxification Inpatient Unit on the sixth floor of the hospital.

The 10-bed unit has a dedicated team of nurses, social workers and other staff with training and experience in detox and behavioral health. The detox unit will help patients safely manage the physical symptoms of withdrawal associated with stopping drug or alcohol abuse and then connect them with services to enhance their possibility for success in overcoming addiction.

Singh

“There is a drug abuse and overdose epidemic in our state, and UTMC is responding with this dedicated unit as part of our increased focus on behavioral health. We want to help people in our community who suffer from addiction,” said Dr. Tanvir Singh, UTMC physiatrist who serves as the unit’s medical director. “Addiction is a brain disease just like any other chronic illness, but these patients also struggle with social stigma and marginalization, which makes it challenging. We need to both treat the disease and connect patients with the resources they need to overcome those challenges for successful recovery.”

Patients will be admitted to the detox unit through referrals from other units within UTMC and through health-care providers in the community, as well as patients and their family members who contact the hospital directly for detox assistance.

Patients must be in active withdrawal from alcohol, opioids or other substances when they are admitted to the UTMC detox unit and commit to immediately entering an intensive outpatient treatment program following their stay in the hospital, which would average three to five days.

UTMC also plans to include individual talk therapy, group therapy, social work visits, physical exercise, mental exercise, and nutrition and self-care classes with community partners as part of its services in the detox unit to address the patients’ medical and psychological needs.

For more information, call 419.383.2337.

World Lymphedema Day event to provide education, support

There are more than 200,000 cases of lymphedema reported in the U.S. every year, but many women still do not receive proper instruction on how to manage the disease.

“It can be developed at any time,” said Renee Schick, manager of the Renee’s Survivor Shop and breast cancer survivor. “Mine started about six years after my surgery and treatments.”

Lymphedema is a disease that results from the lack of lymphatic drainage, causing swelling of the extremities. The condition is most often caused by lymph node removal or damage due to cancer treatment.

While the uncomfortable symptoms associated with the disease sometimes go unnoticed, Schick warns of the dangers of letting lymphedema go untreated.

“Lymphedema is a condition that can be managed,” she said. “If it is not managed, it will continue to get worse and could have major complications.”

Lymphedema is a chronic, incurable disease that may even lead to disfigurement if the person affected does not commit to the long-term self-care.

Those who are interested in learning more about the disease and who may be looking for products to help manage the condition are invited to attend the World Lymphedema Day event hosted by Renee’s Survivor Shop.

World Lymphedema Day is Monday, March 6. The event will be open-house style from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. in the Survivor Shop in the Eleanor N. Dana Cancer Center on the UT Health Science Campus.

“Jobst representatives will have a display of new compression products, compression bras, lymphedema bracelets, swell spots and more,” Schick said. “We will have a lymphedema therapist at the event between 2 and 4:30 p.m. to answer questions.”

For more information, contact Schick at renee.schick@utoledo.edu or 419.383.5243.

Kids get active, eat healthy with Grow Well With Us program

UT Family Medicine residents are promoting healthy lifestyles with nutrition education and physical activity with the Grow Well With Us program supported by the Ohio Medicaid Technical Assistance and Policy Program.

Grow Well With Us aims to teach kids how to make healthy lifestyle choices and is free for children and teens age 18 and younger.

Sessions are held once a week for an eight-week cycle. Each meeting lasts an hour and consists of a 30-minute interactive presentation focusing on nutrition prepared by a certified dietitian and 30 minutes of physical exercise led by an athletic trainer.

Participants take pre- and post-questionnaires, weights, physical fitness evaluations, and satisfaction surveys to evaluate their progress and provide feedback about the program.

Dr. Reem Tawfik, chief resident in family medicine and lead physician for Grow Well With Us, said after the first cycle of the program, parents saw their kids’ behavior change according to what they had learned at the program.

“Moms used to attend the sessions with their kids, and many of them have told me that their kids started to read labels, look at the calories per serving, and started to try healthy choices that were mentioned in the diet lectures,” Tawfik said. “We have even noticed that some of the residents who were delivering the lectures changed behavior and made healthier selections.”

Participants will receive many incentives such as water bottles, sports bags, lunch boxes, T-shirts and more.

All of the sessions will be held at the Morse Fitness Center in Dowling Hall Room 3324 on UT’s Health Science Campus.

The spring session for 2017 will run on Wednesdays, March 1, 8, 15 and 22 and April 5, 12, 19 and 26.

The fall session also will run on Wednesdays, Sept. 6, 13, 20 and 27 and Oct. 4, 11, 18 and 25.

Sessions will take place from 6 to 7 p.m.

For more information or to register for the free program, call 419.383.5502.

Health Science Campus Artist Showcase to open this week

The 12th Annual Health Science Campus Artist Showcase will open Friday, Feb. 17, and run through Friday, April 7, on the fourth floor of Mulford Library.

On display will be nearly 60 works — paintings, drawings, photographs and multimedia pieces — created by 30 students, faculty and staff members in health sciences, including medicine and nursing. 

“This is a chance for individuals who are typically only associated with science to be seen for their creative side,” said Jodi Jameson, assistant professor and nursing librarian at Mulford Library, and member of the artist showcase committee. “The showcase is a way of displaying their artwork and highlighting their talents.”

In conjunction with the free, public exhibit, a reception with the artists will be held Friday, March 3, from 4 to 6 p.m. on the fourth floor of the library. 

“Attendees will have a chance to win books on art and medicine by participating in an art scavenger hunt,” Jameson said, adding that light refreshments will be served.

Visitors can view the artwork during regular library hours: Monday through Thursday from 7:30 a.m. to midnight; Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Saturday from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.; and Sunday from 9 a.m. to midnight.

For more information, visit libguides.utoledo.edu/hscart or contact Jameson at jodi.jameson@utoledo.edu or 419.383.5152.

Orthopaedic symposium set for Feb. 18

Learning to diagnose and treat orthopaedic conditions of various complexities of the spine will be the topic of a symposium Saturday, Feb. 18, on UT’s Health Science Campus.

The event will take place from 7:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in Dowling Hall Room 2315.

The symposium will focus on discussing physical examination; identifying and diagnosing spine conditions; reviewing radiographic findings; and discussing operative and non-operative treatments.

Presenters will include members of the UT Orthopaedic Department: Dr. Nabil Ebraheim, Dr. Hossein Elgafy, Dr. Mustafa Khan, Dr. Joshua Schwind and Dr. Marshall Gillette.

Local physicians and clinicians working in primary care, internal medicine, orthopaedics, pain management, neurology, neurosurgery, and physical and occupational therapy are encouraged to attend.

The cost of the course is $25, and pre-registration is preferred as seating is limited. Breakfast and lunch will be provided.

UT is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

For more information or questions, contact orthopedicsurgery@utoledo.edu or call 419.383.4020.