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Satellites’ ornament sale this week

Looking for a special gift? The Satellites Auxiliary is holding its personalized ornament sale this week.

The sale will take place in UT Medical Center’s Four Seasons Bistro Atrium Monday through Wednesday, Dec. 10-12. Stop by Monday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday from 5 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Wednesday from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m.

“The vendor will personalize while you wait, time permitting, or you can pick up the ornament later,” Lynn Brand, president of the Satellites, said. “There are all kinds of ornaments; categories include family, occupations, sports, religious, medical, inspirational, theatre and dance. Whatever kind of ornament you’re looking for, it’s likely here.”

Cash, credit cards and payroll deduction will be accepted. A portion of the proceeds will benefit health science scholarships and patient programs.

The Satellites Auxiliary is a group that promotes education, research and service programs; provides support of patient programs in accordance with the needs and approval of administration; conducts fundraising events; and provides volunteer services.

For more information on the sale, contact Brand at lynn.brand@utoledo.edu.

Staff Leadership Development Program’s first cohort graduates

Twenty-one University of Toledo staff members who were in the Staff Leadership Development Program’s first cohort graduated Nov. 8 and were officially recognized at a luncheon held in their honor in the Thompson Student Union.

The program was launched in 2017 based on feedback gathered during the strategic planning process from employees who wanted a formal pathway to grow professionally.

“I’m very proud of this inaugural class,” said President Sharon L. Gaber. “No one can ever change the fact that each of them was a member of our first cohort, marking a milestone not only in their tenure with UT, but also in the University’s history.”

“Our goal for this program is twofold — to help candidates grow in their existing positions, as well as to prepare them for expanded leadership roles at UT in the future,” noted Wendy Davis, associate vice president and chief human resources officer.

The one-year Staff Leadership Development Program includes complimentary courses, lectures, assessments and experiential learning facilitated by UT senior leaders, faculty and other subject matter experts.

“Each participant was carefully selected by a multidisciplinary team and completed all required assignments, readings and a capstone project in order to graduate,” said Carrie Herr, director of the Center for Continuous Improvement, who has oversight of the program.

The program has been very well-received, with members of the first cohort representing a wide range of staff positions and departments across UT campuses, according to Herr.

“I would definitely recommend this program to others,” said Kelly Donovan, who works at UT Medical Center. “I was able to foster great relationships with future leaders from various departments, plus had access to our current leaders. And the program instilled leadership skills and confidence that I’ll be able to use for future career goals.”

“What I valued most was learning about so many different facets of higher education, from human resources and recruitment to student affairs, legal and financial matters,” said Craig Turner, who works in the College of Business and Innovation. “I also had the opportunity to gain insights firsthand from UT’s leaders, such as Dr. Gaber, Provost Andrew Hsu and Dr. Chris Cooper, in addition to meeting new colleagues from throughout our campus community.”

In addition to Donovan and Turner, first cohort UT Staff Leadership Development graduates are Stefanie Bias, College of Medicine and Life Sciences; Stacey Jo Brown, Office of Legal Affairs; Candace Busdiecker, College of Medicine and Life Sciences; Lori DeShetler, College of Medicine and Life Sciences; Josh Dittman, Intercollegiate Athletics; Shelly Drouillard, Career Services; Jamie Fager, College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics; Beth Gerasimiak, Office of the Provost; Melissa Hansen, College of Medicine and Life Sciences; Heather Huntley, Office of the Provost; Angelica Johnson, College of Arts and Letters; Deirdre Jones, College of Business and Innovation; Sara Lockett, Purchasing/Finance; Elliott Nickeson, Internal Audit and Compliance; Daniel Perry, Facilities and Construction; Jason Rahe, Division of Technology and Advanced Solutions; Staci Sturdivant, College of Health and Human Services; Tiffany Whitman, University College; and Matthew Wise, Division of Technology and Advanced Solutions.

A second cohort began course work in October and will graduate in November 2019.

Members of the first cohort to graduate from the Staff Leadership Development Program posed for a photo last month with President Sharon L. Gaber, seated center, and Lawrence R. Kelley, executive vice president for finance and administration and chief financial officer, second from left seated, and Carrie Herr, director of the Center for Continuous Improvement, seated between Kelley and the president.

University to close for winter break

As announced earlier this year, the University again will close for winter break at a time when most departments are operationally slow.

UT implemented a new winter break policy in 2017 based on feedback received from employees over several years.

“It’s important that faculty and staff have time to enjoy the holidays and rest before spring semester begins,” said Wendy Davis, associate vice president and chief human resources officer. “Our workforce is our greatest asset, and this break affords many employees additional time off to recharge after a busy semester and spend time with their friends and families.”

The break also helps UT to reduce operating costs while still maintaining crucial functions, such as hospital operations at UT Medical Center, approved research activities and public safety. Winter break does not include UTMC employees and certain required positions, which might vary depending on annual need.

In addition to existing holiday pay, the University provides additional paid days off — either three days or four, depending on which day the holiday falls in the year — to cover this specified time period. UT’s 2018 winter break schedule is:

• Monday, Dec. 24 — Holiday (Columbus Day);

• Tuesday, Dec. 25 — Christmas Day;

• Wednesday, Dec. 26 — Paid day off for winter break;

• Thursday, Dec. 27 — Paid day off for winter break;

• Friday, Dec. 28 — Paid day off for winter break;

• Monday, Dec. 31 — Paid day off for winter break; and

• Tuesday, Jan. 1 — New Year’s Day.

Faculty and staff who work on Main Campus or Scott Park Campus are reminded to refrain from being at the University during winter break, unless pre-approved by their department’s leadership in order to conduct essential business. Access to buildings will be restricted, and facility operations and ground maintenance also will be limited.

Leadership members should soon designate any specific employees who will need to be on call and/or must work during winter break in order to provide essential services, which may include research that cannot be conducted at home.

Additional details, including frequently asked questions, are available on the winter break schedule website. If you have any questions after reviewing this information, contact your supervisor or human resources consultant.

UT nursing student credited with saving life of motorist after crash

Hanan Ramadan was on her way home from her mosque when she came upon a minor car crash. It looked like a simple fender-bender, but something about the way bystanders were crowded around the open car door made her stop.

“Something didn’t seem right,” said Ramadan, who is working toward a bachelor’s degree in nursing at The University of Toledo. “I just wanted to make sure everything was OK. Honestly, I thought maybe she had a broken arm, or she hit her head and there was a small cut.”

Ramadan

As Ramadan got closer, she realized the situation was far more dire — and she quickly sprang into action that likely helped save the woman’s life.

The driver’s face was blue. Ramadan, who also works as a nursing assistant in The University of Toledo Medical Center Emergency Room, looked for a pulse — there wasn’t one.

Ramadan’s training took over. She asked the person who had called 911 to put the phone on speaker and briefed the dispatcher on the situation. Ramadan told them she was basic life support-certified and asked for permission to begin CPR.

Unable to remove the driver from the car, Ramadan lowered the seat back as far as she could and started chest compressions. A police officer soon arrived and helped her safely get the woman onto the ground, where she could continue administering chest compressions.

“It was just us for a good five to 10 minutes before the ambulance showed up and the medics took over,” Ramadan said. “We were all very exhausted but doing our best.”

Sylvania Township Police Sgt. Lee McKinney, who was the first officer on the scene and helped get the victim out of the car, praised Ramadan for her quick thinking and readiness to help.

“The fact that you’ve got somebody who’s willing to be a good Samaritan, recognize a problem, and has some ability to jump in and help, that’s tremendous,” McKinney said. “Those few seconds were irreplaceable. She did an outstanding job in getting involved.”

Ramadan later learned the woman, Deborah Teachout, had been having chest pains and was on her way to urgent care when she lost consciousness.

Teachout’s sister, Bambi McNamara, credits Ramadan and another bystander, Jill Lynam, with helping to save her life.

“We will be forever indebted to Hanan and Jill for saving my sister’s life,” she said.

McNamara said Teachout has regained most of her strength after a week in rehab and should be back home soon.

Ramadan credits her training from the UT College of Nursing and hands-on experience at UTMC for giving her a clear mind in what could have been a moment of chaos.

“It was like muscle memory to me. I just instinctively knew what to do. All of the courses I’ve taken and all the training I’ve gone through, everything my instructors have told me for years, it all came together and just made sense to me in that moment,” she said.

“It made me confident. I knew this is what I’ve been taught and trained to do for years now — this is what I’m supposed to do, and this is what is going to help this person.”

AIDS awareness gala to take place Dec. 1

The University of Toledo African People’s Association and Student National Pharmaceutical Association will hold the ninth annual AIDS Gala Saturday, Dec. 1, in the Thompson Student Union Auditorium.

The awareness gala, which is taking place on World AIDS Day, will include stories of survivors and information about how to protect yourself from HIV/AIDS. This year’s event also will feature live music and performances by the UT FIRE Squad Dance Team and UT Gospel Choir. In addition, free HIV testing will be available.

Doors open at 5 p.m. with the event beginning at 6 p.m. Attendees are asked to wear red, black or white formal attire.

“We hope that this year’s AIDS Awareness Gala will show people who have HIV/AIDS that there are people who support them, and for those who think that they are safe from any sexually transmitted infection to be more informed on not only HIV/AIDS, but other STIs,” said Nikela Johnson, event coordinator for the African People’s Association.

Advance tickets are $10 and can be purchased on the UT Marketplace website. Tickets at the door will be $12.

Proceeds from the gala will be donated to the UT Medical Center’s Ryan White Program, which provides care and counseling for individuals and families affected by HIV/AIDS.

For more information, email the African People’s Association at apa.utoledo@gmail.com or call Ask Rocky at 419.530.4606.

AIDS/HIV topic of Nov. 30 discussion

As HIV has gone from a near-certain death sentence to a manageable lifelong condition, public attention has largely shifted to other diseases.

But HIV isn’t going away. More than 1,000 people are currently living with the virus in Lucas County, and new cases continue being diagnosed every year, including 42 in 2017.

“Now that HIV is no longer necessarily a killer as long as it’s properly treated, it’s lost a bit of attention. But the prevalence hasn’t gone down,” said Brandon Lewis, a second-year medical student at The University of Toledo College of Medicine and Life Sciences, and president of the PEOPLE Club, a student group focused on the health-care needs of the LGBTQ+ community.

The PEOPLE Club, in partnership with The University of Toledo Medical Center’s Ryan White Program, will host a discussion about HIV and AIDS Friday, Nov. 30, ahead of World AIDS Day on Dec. 1.

The free event will be held from noon to 1 p.m. in Collier Building Room 1000B on UT’s Health Science Campus. The event is open to the general public, though students in the medical field are especially encouraged to attend.

Featured speakers will include Dan Barbee, chief executive officer of UTMC, and Dr. Joan Duggan, associate dean of faculty affairs in the UT College of Medicine and Life Sciences, and director of UTMC’s Ryan White Program. There also will be a panel discussion with three clients of UTMC’s Ryan White Program who are living with HIV, as well as free HIV testing.

“Our tagline is debunking the myths,” Lewis said. “We want to break the stigma and misconception of what it’s actually like to live with HIV. By explaining that, we hope to help educate both patients and future medical professionals who may be interacting with those patients once they begin practicing.”

The Ryan White Program offers comprehensive care for individuals and families affected by HIV/AIDS in Lucas County and the surrounding area. Its services include adult primary care, mental health counseling, case management and advocacy.

Reservations are encouraged to Lewis by email to brandon.lewis4@rockets.utoledo.edu.

Work proceeding to renovate, expand Glendale Medical East

UT Medical Center continues to look for opportunities to be more efficient and align hospital resources with clinical priorities. This winter, the hospital will focus those efforts into renovating and expanding Glendale Medical East to meet the primary care needs of patients with increased access and convenience.

The comprehensive health and wellness center will pair family medicine and internal medicine subspecialists in pulmonology, endocrinology, nephrology, cardiology and gastroenterology who will relocate from Ruppert Medical Center. South Toledo Internists also will relocate their practice from Glendale Medical Center.

The facility will feature an additional 44 exam rooms, a retail and specialty pharmacy, general x-ray and basic lab draws. Academic space, a break room and locker rooms also will be incorporated. The convenience of centralized registration will make check-in easy for patients, and with subspecialties co-located in the same building, physician communication and referrals to subspecialties will be improved.

Construction is expected to conclude in spring 2019. Once clinics locate their practices to Glendale Medical East, vacant space in Ruppert Medical Center will be used to accommodate expansion of remaining clinics, as well as providing additional space for outpatient behavioral health services.

“Thank you to the family medicine and internal medicine teams for their input during the design process, and to Facilities and Construction for their diligent work in facilitating the capital improvements,” Allen Siefert, chief administrative officer of outpatient integrated clinic operations, said.

UTMC is working with partners in clinical offices and facilities to make these transitions as smooth as possible and will continue to share updates as construction progresses.

Nov. 27 deadline to order poinsettias from Satellites

Make the season even more festive: Order a poinsettia from the Satellites Auxiliary.

The poinsettias range in price from $6 to $16 and are available in an array of colors, including red, white, pink, and blue with gold. The plants vary in size from 4.5 inches to 7.5 inches and by the number of blooms.

UT students Andrew Yim and Jessica Shippy checked out some poinsettias at the Satellites Auxiliary’s sale last year in Rocket Hall.

Fresh wreathes measuring 14 inches also are available for $11.

“Every year we do this sale as more of a service for our campuses than as a fundraiser,” Lynn Brand, president of the Satellites, said. “We keep our costs very low, and the small amount of profits benefit our scholarships for the College of Medicine and Life Sciences, the College of Nursing, and the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences.”

Poinsettia order forms must be received by Tuesday, Nov. 27. Email lynn.brand@utoledo.edu, fax to 419.383.3206, or drop off to Volunteer Services in Dowling Hall Room 75.

Orders will be available for pickup from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Main Campus Monday, Dec. 3, in the Rocket Hall Lobby and on Health Science Campus Tuesday, Dec. 4, in the Four Seasons Bistro Atrium. All poinsettias will be foiled and sleeved.

Payment is due at the time of pickup; options include cash, checks, and payroll deduction on Health Science Campus.

The Satellites Auxiliary is a group designed to promote education, research and service programs; provide support of patient programs in accordance with the needs and approval of administration; conduct fundraising events; and offer volunteer services.

For more information on the annual sale, contact Brand at lynn.brand@utoledo.edu.

Clinic manager raises funds for American Cancer Society

Chris Kosinski, clinic manager at the Eleanor N. Dana Cancer Center, capped off his promise to wear something pink every day in October with an accessory of a different sort.

Kosinski, who joined the American Cancer Society’s Real Men Wear Pink challenge to raise awareness and money for fighting breast cancer, ended the month by raffling off a chance to toss a pie in his face.

Susan VanCamp won a raffle and had the honor of delivering a pie to Chris Kosinski. The fun stunt was part of Kosinski’s fundraising efforts for the American Cancer Society’s Real Men Wear Pink challenge.

Susan VanCamp, ambulatory staff development and performance improvement director at UT Medical Center’s outpatient clinics, was the winner.

“Any kind of publicity we can get to bring awareness to breast or any other type of cancer is worth it,” Kosinski said. “If we can get a dollar here a penny there to put toward research and studies to help cure cancer, I can take a pie in the face for a couple days. That’s not a bad deal.”

Kosinski’s efforts raised more than $1,050 for the American Cancer Society.

Now that he has the whipped cream cleaned from his face, Kosinski is embracing No Shave November to raise awareness about prostate cancer and other men’s health issues.

In search of excellence found: UT Medical Center Outpatient Rehabilitation Services

Nobody wants to hear these words: “The surgery is really, really painful, but the rehab is even worse.” And that is exactly what everyone was telling me this past spring when I had rotator cuff surgery caused by a college football injury plus a lifetime of active living.

When I came out of surgery, the doctor shared that this was the worst rotator cuff tear that he had seen during his 30 years of surgery, and he reminded me that rehab was going to be very, very challenging.

Dr. Clinton Longenecker, center, posed for a photo with Dr. Mike Travis and Deborah Rohloff.

So with this background, I walked in to the UT Medical Center Outpatient Rehabilitation Services in early summer with a certain level of apprehension and excitement to get started with my rehab to bring back the use of my right shoulder and arm.

Now as a business professor for the past 30 years who studies organizations for a living, I can state with great confidence that excellent organizations tend to be few and far between. Some of the characteristics of excellent enterprises include exceptional care and concern for clients/customers; the use of cutting-edge technology and best practices in delivering services; passionate and dedicated professionals; teamwork and a positive organizational culture; and a willingness to go the extra mile.

Well, based on my recent experience, I have to tell you that our UTMC Outpatient Rehabilitation Services is an excellent organization and demonstrates these attributes day in and day out in performing its invaluable mission of helping thousands of people heal and get healthy.

Several years ago, I had Marci Cancic-Frey, director of therapy services, as an MBA student, and I was always impressed with her passion and enthusiasm as she talked about the quality of our physical therapy services and the exceptional people that she works with. She always said, “Our people are truly dedicated to our patients in delivering exceptional PT services and helping people get well … I truly love my job.” So, needless to say, my expectations were very high going into this experience, and her organization did not disappoint.

When you walk in the door, you are warmly greeted by Sheila Burk or Lakisha Carter or Shannon Walker or Chantel Carter, and you sit in a very comfortable waiting room. The therapy staff is exceptionally punctual, and not one time in my 40 trips to therapy was my therapist ever late or running behind schedule, and they were always sensitive to my time. When your therapist approaches you to walk you back to therapy, you are always greeted with a smile and encouraging words, and their energy is contagious. Our physical therapists use a team-based approach to ensure an effective assessment, a best practices treatment plan that is known and understood by everyone (including me, the patient), and therapy sessions that are designed to help the patient learn, practice and master the necessary exercises to speed recovery. I was also very impressed with the fact that their goal is to schedule treatments in a time frame that was most convenient for me as the patient; this included thoughtful text message reminders of upcoming therapy sessions.

My therapy team included Dr. Mike Travis, physical therapist, and Deborah Rohloff, physical therapy assistant, with support from Alyssa Nino and Kayla Pickard, physical therapy assistants. Each of these professionals had a passion for their work, patient sensitivity, and a willingness to inspire me to push myself during our therapy sessions while at the same time encouraging me to do my exercise homework.

Travis shared his personal philosophy of physical therapy with me when he said, “It’s all about helping people do the things that are necessary to help them achieve good outcomes.” Rohloff shared a similar philosophy: “The best part of my job is seeing my patients achieve their goals and perform life activities that they were previously unable to perform.”

And as you look around the therapy room, you see this philosophy at every turn as our terrific UTMC therapists might be helping a high school athlete come back from a knee injury or a person with severe head trauma learn how to walk again and everything in between. These great professionals became friends as they help me in so many ways, and I’m thankful and proud to know that we are all part of this terrific institution.

I have to say that our UTMC Outpatient Rehabilitation Services, from this patient’s perspective, is simply excellent at the life-changing work that they perform every single day. A special thanks for helping me and countless others. Go UTMC Rockets!

Longenecker is a Distinguished University Professor and director of the Center for Leadership and Organizational Excellence in the College of Business and Innovation.