UT News » Arts

UT News

Categories

Search News

Archives

Resources

Arts

Concerts to feature choirs, orchestra

The University of Toledo Department of Music will present two choral concerts in December.

On Saturday, Dec. 1, the Chamber Singers will perform with the UT Symphony Orchestra at 8 p.m. at Corpus Christi Parish on Dorr Street, across from Main Campus.

Selections to be performed will be “Funeral Music for Queen Mary” by Purcell and Stucky; “The Rumor of a Secret King” by John Mackey; “Da Pacem, Domine” by Peteris Vasks; “Dance of the Tumblers” from “The Snow Maiden” by Rimsky-Korsakov; “Fun and Games” by Dr. Lee Heritage, UT associate professor of music; “Alleluia Laus et Gloria” by Tarik O’Regan; and “Cantata in Nativitate Domini” by Rihards Dubra.

On Friday, Dec. 7, the UT Rocket Choristers and the Glee Club will perform along with the Children’s Choir of Northwest Ohio. The concert will be at 7 p.m. in Doermann Theatre.

The concert will feature a blend of secular and seasonal music.

Tickets —$5 to $10 — will be available at the door or in advance from the UT Center for Performing Arts Box Office by calling 419.530.2787 or visiting the School of Visual and Performing Arts website.

Parking will be free for both concerts.

Ohio poet laureate to read work, sign books Nov. 20

Dr. Dave Lucas is a poet on a mission.

“I don’t want to convince you that you should love poetry. I want to convince you that you already do,” he wrote in a column for the Ohio Arts Council.

Lucas

“If you know by heart the lyrics to your favorite song, you already love one kind of poetry. You love another whenever you laugh at a joke or groan over a bad pun. The jargon of your profession and the slang you speak with friends are poetry. So are the metaphors we use to describe this world we all are trying to understand.”

Lucas, who began his two-year term as Ohio poet laureate in January, will visit The University of Toledo Tuesday, Nov. 20, to talk about his love of words and read his work. The free, public event will take place at 7 p.m. in Libbey Hall.

He also will sign copies of his first collection of poetry, “Weather,” which was published in 2011 and won the 2012 Ohioana Book Award for Poetry. That work also caught the attention of Rita Dove, former U.S. poet laureate, who called Lucas one of 13 “young poets to watch.”

“I’m excited we’re able to bring Dave Lucas to campus,” Dr. Benjamin Stroud, UT associate professor of English, said. “He’s not just an excellent poet, but a great advocate for poetry and, more widely, all the literary arts. He provides a great model to students — and everyone — for how to hone your own craft while also supporting the larger community of poets and writers.”

Since being named the state’s poet laureate Jan. 1, Lucas has been trying to debunk the lofty notions of the measured word.

“Poetry happens — in metaphors or jokes or in poems themselves — at that place where sound and sense blur into each other,” he wrote on the Ohio Arts Council website. “We may not realize that we are under the spell of poetry, because poetry is made of ordinary language (if language can ever be ordinary). Some words we use to toast a wedding or to bless the dead; others we use to order a pizza.”

That everyday sense was at the forefront of his class called Poetry for People Who Hate Poetry at Case Western Reserve University, and with Brews + Prose, a reading series he co-founded and co-curated with the slogan “literature is better with beer.”

Lucas’ poetry is featured in anthologies “The Bedford Introduction to Literature” and “Best New Poets 2015,” and has appeared in several journals, including The American Poetry Review, Blackbird, The Paris Review, Poetry and Slate.

The Cleveland native received a bachelor of arts degree from John Carroll University, a master of fine arts degree in creative writing from the University of Virginia, and master of arts and doctoral degrees in English language and literature from the University of Michigan.

His visit is presented by the Department of English Language and Literature, and the College of Arts and Letters.

For more information, contact Stroud at benjamin.stroud@utoledo.edu or 419.530.2086.

UT Rocket Marching Band to perform Nov. 17 in Valentine Theatre

The University of Toledo Rocket Marching Band will take its show on the road to an indoor venue. The Sounds of the Stadium Concert will be held Saturday, Nov. 17, at 8 p.m. at the Valentine Theatre, 410 Adams St.

The band will perform music from the 2018 football season.

The UT Rocket Marching Band performed during the 2018 Edward C. and Helen G. Schmakel Homecoming Parade.

Highlights of the program will include the music of Panic! at the Disco, Elton John, show tunes from “The Greatest Showman,” and traditional UT favorites.

Tickets are $7 each. Discount tickets are available for groups of 10 and more.

Tickets are available through the UT Center for Performing Arts Box Office, 419.530.ARTS (2787), and on the School of Visual and Performing Arts website, as well as through the Valentine Theatre Box Office, 419.242.ARTS (2787), and the Valentine Theatre website.

For more information, visit the UT Rocket Marching Band page.

UT Opera Ensemble to present ‘Così Fan Tutte’ this weekend

The UT Opera Ensemble will present Mozart’s comic Italian opera, “Così Fan Tutte” (“Women Are Like That”) with a modern country-western twist. Set in a country bar, a friend of two young men bets them that their girlfriends would be unfaithful if left unattended. So, the men take the bet and put their ladies to the test.

The opera will be sung in the original Italian, with subtitles provided.

Be there before the performance for barbecue, beer and free line dancing lessons. Beer is cash bar, and the barbecue will be sold by Deet’s BBQ.

Performances will take place Friday through Sunday, Nov. 16-18, in the UT Center for Performing Arts Recital Hall. Friday and Saturday performances will be at 7 p.m., and Sunday’s show will be at 2 p.m.

Cast members are UT student Alana Scaglioni, soprano, as Fiordiligi; UT alumna Katherine Kuhlman and UT student Kate Walcher, mezzo-sopranos, as Dorabella; UT Music Instructor Justin Bays, baritone, as Guglielmo; UT student Moises Salazar and UT alumnus William Floss, tenors, as Ferrando; UT student Paige Chapman, soprano, as Despina; Jonathan Stuckey, bass baritone, as Don Alfonso; and UT students Kaitlyn Trumbul, Kailyn Wilson, Sterling Wisenewski and Jasmin Davis as the chorus.

Dr. Denise Ritter Bernardini, UT assistant professor of music, is producing and directing the show. Wayne Anthony is the music director, and Scaglioni is the assistant director. Kent Lautzenheiser-Nash is the choreographer.

Tickets $10 to $15 are available through the Center for Performing Arts Box Office by calling 419.530.ARTS (2787), online at the School for Visual and Performing Arts website, and at the door.

For more information, visit the UT Department of Music opera page.

Rock-and-roll scholar analyzes Beatles’ White Album as psychedelic music

To mark the 50th anniversary of what is widely known as the White Album, an English literary and rock-and-roll scholar at The University of Toledo argues the 30-song double album released in November 1968 titled “The Beatles” coherently showcases the fruits of shared psychedelic experiences between John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr.

Dr. Russell Reising, professor in the UT Department of English Language and Literature and original member of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum’s Educational Advisory Board, wrote a 22-page lyrical analysis, “Where Everything Flows,” to be published next year in a collection of essays about the record.

“Tense, yes. Clashing, yes. Disconcerting, yes. Incoherent and lacking any kind of unity, no. ‘The Beatles’ is that place we can go, where everything flows. And flow it does through the broadest possible range of musical styles, lyrical evocations and emotional extremes,” said Reising, who has published books about The Beatles’ “Revolver” album and Pink Floyd’s “Dark Side of the Moon.”

Through the unique, unprecedented scope of diverse subject matter and varied songs like “Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da,” “Helter Skelter,” “While My Guitar Gently Weeps,” “Back in the U.S.S.R.,” “Happiness is a Warm Gun,” “Blackbird,” “Rocky Raccoon” and “Revolution 9,” Reising said the album reveals the transformations of The Beatles’ philosophical point of view and psychological insights after undergoing LSD experiences resulting in psychedelic music.

“They are an expression of the communal consciousness of The Beatles at the time when they stop taking LSD, and the influence of their experiences starts to make itself felt in songs that might not necessarily sound at all psychedelic,” Reising said.

“The diversity of the album is like an attempt to reproduce in record form the philosophical commitment to integration, unity and incorporation — as opposed to conflict — that comes about as a result of the long, reflective, introspective final phases of an LSD experience that influence how one thinks and lives their lives. It makes them more compassionate and more open to a wider range of experiences.”

Reising

The book titled “The Beatles Through a Glass Onion: Reconsidering the White Album,” which is expected to be released in March from the University of Michigan Press, will be the first scholarly volume devoted to the album’s legacy in the Fab Four’s career and in rock history.

“The White Album is awfully, awfully good,” Reising said. “This is not one of my favorite albums, but I like it more than a lot of people do.”

“Even after 50 years, the critics’ view of the White Album remains contested,” said Dr. Mark Osteen, professor of English and director of the Center for the Humanities at Loyola University Maryland, who edited the book. “Given the disparity in response ranging from ‘the product of a band in disarray’ to ‘a rich tapestry of musical textures,’ we believe that this landmark record — still one of the top-selling rock albums of all time — deserves reconsideration.”

Reising’s essay fits into the book’s first section, which outlines the personal, musical and political contexts for the album. The other chapters focus on the music, musicians, lyrics and the album’s legacy.

The songs travel time and space all over the globe. They feature animals such as McCartney’s dog in “Martha My Dear,” as well as different kinds of people like Chairman Mao, Bungalow Bill and the dentist who will pull Eric Clapton’s teeth. The songs have musical and sonic effects from Western and Eastern traditions, reverse tapes, dainty piano pieces, and religious songs.

“No two songs are the same,” Reising said. “You have everything from musical simplicity to incredible complexity. It’s offering the broadest possible range of ideas, attitudes, emotions and sounds that a day in the life might contain.”

Reising evoked James Joyce’s “Ulysses” and Herman Melville’s “Moby Dick” in his commentary on the Fab Four’s songs written between meditative sessions in India in a quest to find inner peace.

“It is commonplace among Melville scholars to refer to the Pequod in ‘Moby Dick’ as a microcosm of the entire world,” Reising said. “We can see ‘The Beatles’ in similar terms.”

“‘The Beatles’ might not exactly be an album whose songs encompass the interconnectedness of all things, but the range of musical styles, of vision, even of length represent something that no other album has even remotely approached, something akin to what James Joyce attempts in ‘Ulysses’ or ‘Finnegan’s Wake.’”

The band became open in the White Album to inviting other significant contributors to their musical efforts.

“They deploy a significant number of ‘partners’ in an unprecedented way,” Reising said. “Either the wife or girlfriend of each Beatle performs on at least one song: Patty Boyd on ‘Piggies,’ Maureen Starkey on ‘The Continuing Story of Bungalow Bill,’ Francie Schwartz on ‘Revolution 1,’ and Yoko Ono on ‘Birthday.’ Never before had wives or girlfriends been present in the recording studio.”

Other artists, including Clapton, Jackie Lomax and Nicky Hopkins, were included.

“Never before had any such independent or otherwise group-affiliated musicians graced Beatles’ recordings,” Reising said.

He said the album is almost like a day in the life, from sleeplessness to insomnia to gentle easing to sleep. The first song, which starts with screaming jet engines, has a lyric, “Didn’t get to bed last night”; the album has a middle song titled “I’m So Tired”; and the last song is called “Good Night,” ending the album with Starr singing, “Good night, sleep tight,” and then whispering, “Good night… Good night, everybody… Everybody, everywhere… Good night.”

The 50th anniversary of “The Beatles” is Nov. 22, 1968.

These photos of, from left, John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr, were included in “The Beatles.”

2018-19 Piano Series to open Nov. 3-4

Guest pianist Logan Skelton will open the annual Dorothy MacKenzie Price Piano Series this week at The University of Toledo.

He will present a master class Saturday, Nov. 3, from 10 a.m. to noon and a recital Sunday, Nov. 4, at 3 p.m. Both free, public events will be held in the Center for Performing Arts Recital Hall.

Skelton

Skelton is a sought-after pianist, teacher and composer whose work has received international critical acclaim. As a performer, Skelton has played in the United States, Europe and Asia, and has been featured on many public radio and television stations, including NPR’s Audiophile Audition, Performance Today, All Things Considered and Morning Edition, as well as on radio in China and national television in Romania.

He has recorded numerous discs for Centaur, Albany, Crystal, Blue Griffin and Naxos Records, the latter on which he performed on two pianos with fellow composer-pianist William Bolcom.

A devoted teacher, Skelton has been repeatedly honored by the University of Michigan, including in 2003 the Harold Haugh Award for excellence in studio teaching, and most recently in 2017 with the Arthur F. Thurnau named professorship, among the highest honors given to faculty members at the school. He has served on the faculties of Manhattan School of Music and Missouri State University, and is currently the Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Piano and director of doctoral studies in piano performance at the University of Michigan.

Skelton’s program will feature several works by Béla Bartók. It also will include two of Skelton’s works, “Civil War Variations” and his arrangement of Bartók’s transcription of “Concerto for Orchestra.” Bartók’s original transcription was prepared by Bartók’s student György Sándor.

For more information, contact Dr. Michael Boyd, UT professor of piano, at michael.boyd@utoledo.edu or 419.530.2183.

UT to honor WWI armistice anniversary with new adaptation of ‘All Quiet on the Western Front’

The University of Toledo Department of Theatre and Film will present the premiere of a new adaptation of Erich Marie Remarque’s “All Quiet on the Western Front” in November in the Center for Performing Arts Center Theatre.

Created with permission from the Remarque estate, this production will be performed during the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I.

Performances will take place Friday through Sunday, Nov. 2-4 and 9-11. Curtain time is 7:30 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays, and 2 p.m. on Sundays.

The production follows the story of a lost generation facing many of the same lessons of today and the lessons history continues to challenge us to learn. It is adapted and directed by Dr. Matt Foss, UT assistant professor of theatre.

“Our adaptation preserves the familiar and famous characters and events from Remarque’s novel, while employing a kind of transparent theatricality as this company of soldiers navigates the last year of the war,” Foss said.

“We’re excited to have a special performance on Nov. 11, the actual anniversary of the armistice 100 years ago.”

In honor of Veterans Day, the Department of Theatre and Film will offer two free tickets to veterans and current military service members to attend the show’s final performance Sunday, Nov. 11. Those interested should contact the Center for Performing Arts Box Office at 419.530.2787 or thearts@utoledo.edu to reserve seats. Tickets are subject to availability.

The cast features Emily Damschroder, a freshman majoring in theatre, as Detering; Kurt Elfering, a senior majoring in religious studies, as Ginger; Bailey Flint, a junior majoring in theatre and media communications, as Westhus; Bryan Harkins, a senior majoring in theatre with a minor in legal specialties, as Himmelstoss; Jackson Howard, a sophomore majoring in film studies, as Kemmerich; Imani (Mo) Hudson, a sophomore majoring in theatre, as Tjaden; Gillian Martin, a junior majoring in media communications with a minor in theatre, as Kat; Faith Murphy, a junior majoring in theatre, as Leer; Justin Petty, a junior majoring in theatre with a minor in film, as Paul; Austin Rambo, a senior majoring in theatre with a minor in media communications, as Kropp; Alexandria Rayford-West, a sophomore, majoring in theatre and creative writing, as Mueller; Shaquira Jackson, a senior majoring in theatre, as Bertin; and Carlos Washington, a sophomore majoring in theatre, as a solider.

Helping Foss behind the curtain are Dr. Edmund Lingan, professor and chair of theatre and film, who is the producer; Shaquira Jackson, a senior majoring in theatre design technology, who is the choreographer; Kevin Upham, a senior majoring in theatre, who is the scenic designer; Kelly McBane, costume shop manager, who is the costume designer; Stephen Sakowski, assistant professor of lighting and sound design, who is the lighting designer; Ryan Peters-Hieber, a senior majoring in theatre design technology, who is the sound designer; Faith Pegus, a junior majoring in art with a minor in theatre technology, who is the assistant scenic designer; Logan Fleming, a sophomore majoring in theatre, who is the associate costume designer; Katelyn Justice, a sophomore majoring in theatre, who is the assistant light designer; Addison Toth, a freshman majoring in theatre, who is the stage manager; and Victoria Diesing, a sophomore majoring in theatre, who is the assistant stage manager.

Tickets are $10 for students; $12 for UT faculty, staff and alumni, and military members and seniors; and $18 for the general public. Call 419.530.ARTS (2787) or order online at UToledo Ticket Sales. Tickets also will be available at the door.

Lake Erie Center photo contest seeking submissions

The Lake Erie Center’s ninth annual photo contest is accepting entries through Friday, Nov. 2.

Amateur photographers of all ages and skill levels are invited to share their nature photographs featuring the beauty of the region extending from Oak Openings to Maumee Bay.

“We host this contest every year because we feel it is important to mesh art and science, and we enjoy showcasing the amazing photographs we receive each year,” said Rachel Lohner, education program manager at the Lake Erie Center.

The theme of the contest is “The Nature of Our Region: From Oak Openings to Maumee Bay.”

Color and black-and-white photographs will be accepted. Entries are limited to three per person.

Prizes will be awarded in multiple age categories. First-place winners in each category will take home $25, and the grand-prize winner will receive $100.

Winners of the contest will be invited to attend an awards reception and receive their prizes in January.

Read more about the contest and enter photos at utoledo.edu/nsm/lec/webforms/lec-photo-contest.html.

Department of Theatre and Film to hold auditions for two productions

The University of Toledo Department of Theatre and Film will hold two sets of auditions this fall.

The first auditions, for the play “The Pillowman,” will be held Monday and Tuesday, Oct. 22-23.

The second set will be for the musical “Into the Woods” and will be held Tuesday and Wednesday, Nov. 13-14.

All auditions will take place from 6 to 9 p.m. in the Center for Performing Arts Studio Theatre.

Auditions are open to everyone, including members of the community. Cast members do not need to be UT students. Parking is free during the auditions.

For the play auditions, participants should prepare a one-minute monologue that must be memorized. For the musical, they must prepare a theatre song.

Scripts are available for a 24-hour loan period and are in the department office. Sign-up sheets and audition forms are posted on the production call board near the dressing rooms in the Center for Performing Arts. Audition forms can be filled out in advance, but they must be brought to the audition. Additional audition forms will be available the evening of tryouts.

Performances for “The Pillowman” will be held Feb. 1-10. Performances for the “Into the Woods” are April 5-20. Rehearsal schedules will be determined after the shows are cast.

Written by Martin McDonagh, “The Pillowman” will be directed by Quincy Joyner, UT assistant lecturer of theatre. The play is about a fiction writer who is interrogated by police because the content of his stories is horrifyingly similar to a string of recent child murders.

“Into the Woods” will be directed by Dr. Edmund Lingan, UT professor and chair of theatre. Based on the book by James Lapine, the production features music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim. Four fictional characters are taken out of their fairy tale stories and given the chance to make their deepest wishes come true. The characters find themselves on a quest that somehow becomes intertwined with the other characters’ journeys.

UPDATED: Filmmaker to show documentary on racism

“Man on Fire,” a documentary about racism, will be screened Thursday, Oct. 18, at 6 p.m. in the Thompson Student Union Auditorium.

Director Joel Fendelman will introduce the work and lead a question-and-answer session after the screening.

However, the workshop scheduled for Friday, Oct. 19, has been canceled.

“Man on Fire” focuses on Grand Saline, Texas, which has a history of racism, a history the community refuses to talk about. This shroud of secrecy ended when Charles Moore, an elderly white preacher, self-immolated to protest the town’s racism in 2014, shining a spotlight on the town’s dark past.

In the 2017 film, Fendelman and Dr. James Chase Sanchez examined the protest and question the racism in Grand Saline as it stands today.

“It’s important for people to realize that things like racism and race relations do not exist in a vacuum,” Jennifer Pizio, associate director in the UT Office for Diversity and Inclusion, said. “By taking time to learn about the historical context within which a situation arises, we are better able to grasp the why and how so we can do things differently and, hopefully, better.”

The free, public event is co-sponsored by the Office of Diversity and Inclusion; the College of Arts and Letters; the Roger Ray Institute for the Humanities; the Department of English, Language and Literature; the Department of History; and the Department of Theatre and Film.

For more information, contact the Office of Diversity and Inclusion at 419.530.2260.