UT News » — Communication and the Arts

UT News

Categories

Search News

Archives

Resources

— Communication and the Arts

‘Wearable Conditions’ event scheduled for April 28

There will be fashionable art and more at the “Wearable Conditions” exhibition Thursday, April 28, at 7 p.m. at the Toledo Museum of Art Glass Pavilion.  

The event will include lectures by Dr. Brian Kennedy, president, director an CEO of the Toledo Museum of Art, and Brian Carpenter, UT gallery director and lecturer in the Art Department.  

TemplateAnd there will be an original soundtrack featuring music played and created by Marc Folk, executive director of the Arts Commission of Greater Toledo.  

Ten student wearable works of art will be exhibited in a fashion show.

The concept of wearable art was developed last year, according to Carpenter.

“Students select and research a disease, virus or disorder, and then conceptualize and create a wearable work of art inspired by it,” he said. “This allows for individual student works to join together and present as a cohesive body of work and ultimately a performance.  

“The act of conceptualizing an internal virus, disease or disorder by externalizing that focus into new forms reinforces student recognition of fundamental art-making processes. Art is essentially an internal concept manifested into an external object or performance.”

Students also benefit from the research experience.

“Through research, students are exposed to characteristics of a virus, disease or disorder they may never have considered,” Carpenter said. “This exposure brings about an awareness of not only the physical structure of these conditions, but also the treatments, policies, social constructs and politics that surround them as well.”

For more information on the free, public event, contact Carpenter at brian.carpenter@utoledo.edu.

Faculty members receive promotion, tenure

A number of faculty members received tenure and promotion for the 2016-17 academic year approved April 18 by the UT Board of Trustees.

Faculty members who received tenure and promotion to associate professor are:

College of Business and Innovation

• Dr. Mai Dao, Accounting
• Dr. Anthony Holder, Accounting
• Dr. Yue Zhang, Operations and Technology Management

Judith Herb College of Education

• Dr. Victoria Stewart, Curriculum and Instruction

College of Languages, Literature and Social Sciences

• Dr. Gaby Semaan, Foreign Languages
• Dr. Benjamin Stroud, English Language

College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics

• Dr. Malathi Krishnamurthy, Biological Sciences
• Dr. Rong Liu, Mathematics and Statistics

College of Social Justice and Human Service

• Dr. Wendi Goodlin-Fahncke, Criminal Justice and Social Work
• Dr. Debra Harmening, School Psychology, Higher Education and Counselor Education

The faculty member who received tenure and promotion to professor is:

College of Law
• Kara Bruce

The faculty member who received tenure is:

College of Law
• Gregory Gilchrist, associate professor

Faculty members promoted to professor are:

College of Communication and the Arts
• Dr. Timothy Brakel, Music

Judith Herb College of Education

• Dr. Svetlana Beltyukova, Educational Foundations and Leadership
• Dr. Judy Lambert, Curriculum and Instruction

College of Engineering
• Dr. Duane Hixon, Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering
• Dr. Douglas Nims, Civil Engineering

Jesup W. Scott Honors College
• Dr. Barbara Mann

College of Languages, Literature and Social Sciences

• Dr. Linda Rouillard, Foreign Languages

College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics

• Dr. Peter Andreana, Chemistry and Biochemistry
• Dr. Jonathan Bossenbroek, Environmental Sciences
• Dr. Rupali Chandar, Physics and Astronomy
• Dr. Joseph Schmidt, Chemistry and Biochemistry

College of Social Justice and Human Service

• Dr. Richard Johnson, Criminal Justice and Social Work

The faculty member promoted to associate professor is:

College of Law
• Bryan Lammon

The faculty member promoted to associate clinical professor is:

College of Health Sciences
• Dr. Lynne Chapman, Rehabilitation Sciences

Tribute set for longtime Communication Department faculty member

A memorial service honoring Don Reiber will be held in The University of Toledo’s Savage Arena Sunday, April 24, at 2 p.m.

Reiber, associate professor of communication and the director of the Department of Communication’s Media Services, passed away Sept. 20 at age 68.

Reiber

Reiber

He spent 36 years at the University teaching television production, live-truck production, and radio production and programming. His students and alumni number in the thousands, working in broadcasting in Toledo, across the United States, and for national news organizations, including CNN.

“Everything you’ve heard about Don Reiber is true,” Paul Helgren, UT associate athletic director, said. “What made him a great employee was his work ethic, professionalism and dedication to UT — especially UT students. What made him a great person was his easy-going nature and his genuine interest in others.

“He touched so many lives, probably many more than he ever realized,” Helgren said. “Don helped make this University great. His influence will be felt here for many years to come.”  

Dan Saevig, UT associate vice president of alumni relations and longtime friend, will emcee the program, which was planned according to the wishes of Reiber’s wife, Pat, and son, Christopher.

“We have alumni from as far away as California coming for the service,” Saevig said. “We expect several hundred to be there to celebrate a great human being who did so much for students and this University.”

Students gathered Sept. 20 on Centennial Mall for a candlelight vigil to remember Don Reiber, associate professor of communication, who passed away suddenly that morning.

Students gathered Sept. 20 on Centennial Mall for a candlelight vigil to remember Don Reiber, associate professor of communication, who passed away suddenly that morning.

Several speakers will share remembrances. These will include Dr. Clint Longenecker, UT Stranahan Distinguished University Professor and director of the Center for Leadership and Organization Excellence; Dr. Nagi Naganathan, dean of the College of Engineering; Mike O’Brien, vice president and athletic director; and Tricia Cullop, head coach of the women’s basketball team.

And there will be a video tribute put together by Dr. Jackie Layng, professor of communication; John Eidemiller, executive producer and media services coordinator in the Communication Department; and Jonathan Mondelli, UT instructor of communication.

“I just felt that if you are going to honor a broadcasting professor, then doing a broadcasting video seems the right thing to do, especially because he lived and breathed broadcasting every day of his life,” Layng said.

“What I hope to do with the video is show the many sides of Don and the impact he had on me, the students, the staff and the University. We all had a very special relationship with this incredibly kind man who made everyone he met feel special,” she said.

Eidemiller is one of those students that Reiber took under his production wing.

“For me, Don was more than a teacher, or a boss, or even a mentor. He was like a second father,” Eidemiller said. “From fall 1997 when I switched my major from engineering to communication at the start of my sophomore year, through spring 2000 when I graduated, I spent more time with Don than with anyone else. He probably taught me more about every facet of production during those three years than I’ve learned in the 16 years since.”

One of the most decorated yet unassuming faculty members at the University, Reiber received the Outstanding Teacher Award in 2007. In his career, he also was honored with the Students First Award, which was presented by the University administration for his dedication to instruction and mentoring; the Difference Maker Award from the College of Business and Innovation; and the Rocket Award from the women’s basketball team for his commitment to that program.

“I know I can’t do him justice in a five-minute video, but I am going to try and honor my friend in a way I know he would appreciate the production value,” Layng said. “He was a very humble person and would not have liked all the fuss we are making over him now, but he would appreciate a good production with a good story, so I’m going to try and tell some of his story.”

Part of that story is Reiber’s far-reaching influence.

“When I came back to Toledo after two years in Washington, D.C., it was because there was a position open here, and I absolutely could not pass up the opportunity to work with Don,” Eidemiller said. “While I can say that I am slowly getting used to his absence, there isn’t a day that goes by that I don’t miss him. And I will be forever grateful for everything he did for me over the almost 20 years that I knew him.”

“Don was and still is a true inspiration to all that had the pleasure to have worked with him. He made us all want to be better at what we do,” said Tyler Mattson, a student who will receive a bachelor’s degree in communication in May and who received a bachelor’s degree in pharmaceutics in 2014. “I knew Don for seven years from helping at events across campus. We all know that everything he did at UT wasn’t because he had to, but because he wanted to. It was with this that he showed and inspired all of his students and those who had come to know him.

“Don will always have a place not only at UT, but in our hearts as well,” Mattson said.

The tribute video will roll at the end of the service.

Another honor was started last fall: the Don Reiber Student Production Fund.

“Without any solicitation, that fund has raised more than $20,000,” Saevig said. “Don always wanted the students to come first. He was one who didn’t want recognition, but I think one thing that would make him happy is that his friends and colleagues stepped up for something that will directly benefit the students.”

The fund in Reiber’s memory was established with the intention of dedicating the production control room in Savage Arena in his honor, pending approval by the UT Board of Trustees and the completion of a fundraising campaign.

Contributions may be made to the Don Reiber Student Production Fund to The University of Toledo Foundation. Go to https://give2ut.utoledo.edu.

UT Social Documentary Photo class partners with Arts Commission/AmeriCorp for exhibition

This semester, students in UT Art Professor Deborah Orloff’s Social Documentary Photography class have been working in partnership with the Arts Commission of Greater Toledo and AmeriCorp to help further Toledo’s Strategic Plan for Arts and Culture.

Christie, a local garden owner, was photographed in front of Tom’s Carryout on Lagrange Street by Lucas Sigurdson.

Christie, a local garden owner, was photographed in front of Tom’s Carryout on Lagrange Street by Lucas Sigurdson.

The city’s plan is designed to “support cultural vibrancy, economic revitalization, and to connect and grow the rich network of creative life that exists in Toledo.”

Working with the Arts Commission, Orloff and her students have volunteered their talents to help capture the stories of Toledo’s creatives and community leaders. Students have been interviewing people in the community and capturing the essence of their work through photographs.

The students’ images will be featured on the Arts Commission’s new website, print materials, and in an exhibition at the Parkwood Gallery, which is housed in the Professional Building at 1838 Parkwood Ave. The exhibition, “Toledo Vitality,” will open with a reception Thursday, April 14, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.

“Toledo is a vibrant city with rich cultural resources, and a thriving arts scene, but, ultimately, people make a city great,” Orloff said. “This exhibition celebrates some of those individuals.”

Orloff said the Department of Art’s innovative class was designed to expose students to the rich history of social documentary photography and allow students to experiment within the genre, while simultaneously working within the community in a professional capacity. The service-learning component of the course provides students with practical, hands-on experience working with regional agencies to support and enhance the local community.

UT alumna Jules Webster, artist and owner of the Art Supply Depo, was photographed by Abigail Ruppel. Webster, a Toledo arts activist, received a bachelor of fine arts degree from the University in 2007.

UT alumna Jules Webster, artist and owner of the Art Supply Depo, was photographed by Abigail Ruppel. Webster, a Toledo arts activist, received a bachelor of fine arts degree from the University in 2007.

“It’s an amazing opportunity for the students to get professional experience out in the real world while simultaneously helping to further the city’s Strategic Plan for Arts and Culture and improve the region; each student is making a difference in the community,” Orloff said. “It’s important to talk about social change and look at slides in a classroom, but our students are actually out there doing it.”

The class also will serve UT’s new Peace Studies Program and become a regular offering in the Department of Art.

A second photography exhibition is on display in the Center for the Visual Arts Clement Gallery at UT’s Toledo Museum of Art Campus. This exhibit features examples of the photo students’ personal projects, also created in the social documentary class.

Both free, public exhibitions will run through Thursday, May 5, and the galleries will remain open until 7:30 p.m. April 21 for the next 3rd Thursday Art Loop.

Parkwood Gallery hours are Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The Clement Gallery is open daily from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.

For more information, contact Orloff, associate chair of the UT Art Department, at 419.530.8314 or deborah.orloff@utoledo.edu.

UT to open ‘Little Shop of Horrors’ April 8

The University of Toledo Department of Theatre and Film will present the musical “Little Shop of Horrors” Friday through Sunday, April 8 to 10, 15 to 17, and 22 to 24, in which a hapless florist rises to fame and fortune when he accommodates his plant’s hunger for blood and human flesh.  

A live chamber orchestra comprised of UT music students will accompany each performance under the direction of Nathanael Leonard, Toledo Public Schools music teacher and UT Department of Music alumnus.

Little ShopThe book and lyrics for this cult classic were written by Howard Ashman with music by Alan Menken.

UT’s performances will be directed by Dr. Edmund Lingan, associate professor and chair of theatre and film. Choreography will be created by Jessica Bonenfant-Coogan, who has collaborated with Lingan over a 10-year period on productions in Toledo and New York City.

“With this production of ‘Little Shop of Horrors,’ I am returning to the film-noir look of the original 1960 movie that the musical is based on,” Lingan said. “I first saw the movie when I was a little kid, and it was the first time that I realized horror could be funny. I think that’s probably why it translated into a musical comedy so well. Of course, the plot and the songs of the musical are really wonderful.”

The cast is a mix of UT theatre and music students, some UT alumni, and two faculty members: Cornel Gabara, associate professor of theatre, and Denise Ritter-Bernardini, assistant professor of music and director of the UT Opera Ensemble.

“The acting, scenery, costumes and singing in this production are going to wow the audience,” Lingan said. “I think people are going to have a great time with this one.”

Performances will be held Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m. in the Center for Performing Arts Center Theatre.

Tickets are $20 general admission; $15 for UT faculty, staff, alumni, seniors and members of the military; and $10 for students and children. Tickets are available in advance from the UT Center for Performing Arts Box Office, by calling 419.530.ARTS (2787), and online at utoledo.tix.com.

Pianist to play Liszt at April 3 recital

Dr. Ryan Behan will visit UT Saturday and Sunday, April 2 and 3, for the Dorothy MacKenzie Price Piano Series.

On the weekend he is here, Behan will present a master class at 10 a.m. Saturday and a recital at 3 p.m. Sunday. Both free, public events will be held in the Center for Performing Arts Recital Hall.

Behan

Behan

The recital program will consist of selected works from the first, second and third year of Franz Liszt’s “Années de Pèlerinage” (“Years of Pilgrimage”). These works are considered a summation of Liszt’s musical style, and many are linked to masterworks of art and literature.

Behan, a great fan of Liszt, is a founding member of the Ohio Chapter of the American Liszt Society.

As lecturer at Ohio State University, Behan has taught applied piano and served as opera coach for the School of Music.

He has won acclaim from audiences throughout the United States and Europe as an exceptionally versatile pianist. Season 2014-15 highlights include performances as concerto soloist with the Toledo Symphony Orchestra and Vince Lee, conductor, and solo concerts at the Valentine Theater in Toledo.

A winner in the Fischoff National Chamber Music Competition, Behan also serves on the collaborative faculty of the Mozarteum International Summer Academy in Salzburg, Austria, where he has worked alongside many great instrumental artists and teachers, including Umberto Clerici, Michael Frischenschlager, Igor Petrushevski and Zakhar Bron, as well as American opera singer Grace Bumbry.

The Toledo Piano Teachers Association assists with The University of Toledo Dorothy MacKenzie Price Piano Series. The association provides students for the master class, publicity for the class and concert, and refreshments for the reception in the lobby following the concert.

UT gives back to community through Big Event

Nearly 1,700 students, faculty and staff from The University of Toledo spent Saturday giving back to the community.

The volunteers spent most of the day raking, painting, picking up garbage, washing windows, and so much more at area residential homes, nursing homes, parks and even on campus.

Alpha Xi Delta and Pi Kappa Alpha, a social sorority and fraternity, teamed up to clean up a local garden for this year's Big Event.

Alpha Xi Delta and Pi Kappa Alpha, a social sorority and fraternity, teamed up to clean up a local garden for this year’s Big Event.

This annual Big Event, which is the largest annual single-day community service event completed by UT students in the Toledo area, is an effort to say thanks and give back to the community, which supports the University so much.

“It makes the University more visible in the community,” said Anthony Strother, an operations and supply chain management student and director of this year’s event. “We’re already so close with the community, and many local businesses employ our students. This shows that we’re willing to give back in any way we can.”

The collective efforts of the UT students, as well as the faculty and staff who participated this year for the first time, totaled more than 6,400 hours of service.

“Big Event was a really great way to get involved with the Toledo community outside campus,” said Ashley Gearheart, a sophomore communication student, who participated this year with her sorority, Alpha Chi Omega. “Picking up trash downtown initially didn’t sound like a very fun way to spend our Saturday morning, but I think we all left with a sense of accomplishment and felt good about our positive contribution to the city.”

The volunteers shared their experience on social media with the hashtags #UTBE and #ServiceSaturday on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

For additional stories and photos from the day, follow the Big Event on Twitter at @UToledoBIGEvent.

2016 Student Filmmakers Showcase set for March 19

The UT Department of Theatre and Film will host its annual Student Filmmakers Showcase Saturday, March 19, at 7:30 p.m. in the Center for Performing Arts Center Theatre.

This event will publicly present competitively selected works by student filmmakers within the Department of Theatre and Film.

This still is from Josh Lowry's “Droplets,” which will be shown in the 2016 Student Filmmakers Showcase.

This still is from Josh Lowry’s “Droplets,” which will be shown in the 2016 Student Filmmakers Showcase.

The Student Filmmakers Showcase will feature a broad range of stories that have been created by UT students. The screenings will include comedies, dramas, documentaries, alternative cinema and animations. Not all film content is appropriate for young children.

Following the movies, there will be an after party with music, free food, door prizes and music open to all showcase goers.

The event is co-sponsored by the Department of Theatre and Film and The University of Toledo Film Video Society.

This still is from James Aponte's “Pursuit,” which also will be shown during the 2016 Student Filmmakers Showcase.

This still is from James Aponte’s “Pursuit,” which also will be shown during the 2016 Student Filmmakers Showcase.

“It’s exciting to see everyone come together to celebrate their hard work,” Crista Constantine, student showcase organizer, said. “This year, we’ve gathered a number of judges from alumni to people in the community. We received donations from places in the community as door prizes and food for the after party.”

“This is the film and video majors’ night to shine. The old adage, ‘work is love made visible’ is all about this night,” Holly Hey, associate professor of film and faculty adviser for the showcase, said. “Putting the showcase together is no easy task, but the amount of work and resolve that these students put into their own projects and into each other’s projects is beyond comprehension sometimes. Our annual gala celebrates the love they have for filmmaking, their classmates, and the film and video program at The University of Toledo.”

The screening typically lasts until around 10 p.m. and includes a 10- to 15-minute intermission. The after party usually ends around midnight.

Ticket prices are $10 general admission and $5 for all UT employees and students, members of the military, children and seniors 60 and older. Tickets may be purchased in advance at the UT Center for Performing Arts Box Office by calling 419.530.ARTS (2787) or by visiting utoledo.tix.com.

Science of saving artwork subject of lectures March 18, 19

The science of saving works of art will be the subject of two free lectures to be given by Gregory Smith, the Otto N. Frenzel III Senior Conservation Scientist at the Indianapolis Museum of Art.

The lectures are sponsored by The University of Toledo’s College of Communication and the Arts and the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, and the Toledo Museum of Art.

Friday, March 18, Smith will give a talk titled “Disappearing Ink! Unraveling the Fading of a Modern Design Object” at 6 p.m. in the Toledo Museum of Art Little Theater.

He will examine a contemporary vase from the design collection that faded badly during its first year after entering the Indianapolis Museum of Art collection. This led to Smith’s exploration of its continuing lightfastness issues, an interview with the artist, and a scientific analysis of the materials of its creation.

In addition, he will talk about Untitled #1176, a contemporary work by artist Petah Coyne in the Toledo Museum of Art’s collection.

"Undergrowth With Two Figures" by Vincent van Gogh

“Undergrowth With Two Figures” by Vincent van Gogh

Saturday, March 19, Smith’s talk is titled “Goghing, Goghing, Gone! The Analysis of Color Fading in Masterpieces by Vincent van Gogh.” The lecture will take place at 9:30 a.m. in Wolfe Hall Room 1205 on UT’s Main Campus.

The lecture will highlight a recent collaborative project investigating color fading in Vincent van Gogh’s 1890 masterpiece, “Undergrowth With Two Figures.” The artist’s use of a modern fugitive dye, present as the pigment Geranium Lake, has resulted in significant color change in the picture and a shift in the aesthetics of the artwork. A brief history of the synthesis of eosin and of its importance in artworks of the late 1800s will be given.

Smith will show how a virtual restoration of the painting using realistic colored layers determined by micro-colorimetry of cross-sections of the painting gives a better “impression” of this post-Impressionist’s artistic efforts.

Part of the Saturday Morning Science program, this talk is presented by the UT Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry.

Vocal performances scheduled this week

The University of Toledo Department of Music will present two student vocal performances. One will spotlight several UT choirs, and the other will feature the UT Opera Ensemble.

The UT Concert Chorale will take the stage of Doermann Theater Thursday, March 17.

The UT Concert Chorale will take the stage of Doermann Theater Thursday, March 17.

On Thursday, March 17, the UT Concert Chorale, the Women’s Chamber Ensemble and the University Chorus will perform a program titled “The Drumsound Rises” at 7 p.m. in Doermann Theater. The concert will showcase works by composers Daniel Elder, Sydney Guillaume, Moira Smiley and Arturs Maskats.

On Sunday, March 20, the UT Opera Ensemble will perform a variety of selections from favorite operas at 3 p.m. in the Center for Performing Arts Recital Hall. From Mozart to Bernstein, the program will include an eclectic mix of scenes from popular Italian, French and German operas, as well as selections from operettas.

Members of the UT Opera Ensemble, shown here in “The Magic Flute” last fall, will perform Sunday, March 20, in the Center for Performing Arts Recital Hall.

Members of the UT Opera Ensemble, shown here in “The Magic Flute” last fall, will perform Sunday, March 20, in the Center for Performing Arts Recital Hall.

Both concerts require tickets that can be purchased through the UT Center for Performing Arts Box Office by calling 419.530.ARTS (2787) or by visiting utoledo.tix.com.

Ticket prices for “The Drumsound Rises” are $8 general admission and $4 for students and seniors 60 and older.

For the UT Opera Ensemble, tickets are $12 general admission; $10 for faculty, staff, alumni and seniors 60 and older; and $7 for students.