UT News » — Judith Herb College of Education

UT News

Categories

Search News

Archives

Resources

— Judith Herb College of Education

UT partners with Imagination Station to develop hands-on learning for area youth

The University of Toledo is teaming up with Imagination Station to develop a preschool network to promote hands-on science exploration in the region.

Congresswoman Marcy Kaptur announced last week a $311,676 competitive grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services’ National Leadership Grants for Museums awarded to the Imagination Station to create the network, which will be called Prime Time, that will promote early STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) in partnership with UT and other local educational partners.

“It is vitally important that we expose young children to STEM educational opportunities,” Kaptur said. “We know that investments in early education programs provide significant long-term dividends in a child’s education. The Imagination Station is the perfect facilitator to bring together our regional groups to enhance the STEM education of our youngest citizens. While this specific project focuses on preschoolers, the science center is a vital resource for children and adults of all ages in our region.”

Dr. Charlene Czerniak, professor emeritus of science education and research professor in the UT College of Engineering, was the primary author of the successful grant proposal.

“The University of Toledo’s role is to provide best practices resulting from our previous research to engage both pre-K children and their parents in inquiry-based learning through meaningful play,” she said. “It is important to let children play and explore, but we want to enhance that experience with questions about why did that happen or what do you think the result will be if we do this differently? It is getting young people excited about predicting the outcome and then learning through hands-on investigation.”

Czerniak led the UT NURTURES research program, which stands for Networking Urban Resources with Teachers and University enRich Early Childhood Science, which was funded with a $10 million grant from the National Science Foundation. The interactive family programs and the take-home family science packs created for NURTURES will be updated to fit this new Prime Time program. UT educators Dr. Susanna Hapgood and Dr. Lacey Strickler-Eppler, who are associated with the NURTURES program, also will provide training for Imagination Station staff.

In addition to UT, the community partners include the Toledo-Lucas County Public Library, Earl Learner’s Collaborative, Aspire, Polly Fox Academy and Summit YMCA Head Start.

Revved up: Assistant dean pays tribute to alma mater with Rocket Room

One look at Donovan Nichols’ Rocket Room and it’s clear: He’s got spirit; yes, he does.

The assistant dean for student involvement and leadership exudes enthusiasm explaining how he put together the ultimate UT fan zone.

Donovan Nichols stood beneath the sign that inspired his Rocket Room. As an undergraduate in 2002, he picked up the sign that hung in Rocky's Attic during the 1980s.

Donovan Nichols stood beneath the sign that inspired his Rocket Room. As an undergraduate in 2002, he picked up the sign that hung in Rocky’s Attic during the 1980s.

“The whole idea has been 14 years in the making,” he said looking around his basement walls emblazoned with UT jerseys, ticket stubs, posters, stories and more. “But actually putting this together took about five months.”

He pointed to a wooden sign featuring old Rocket and UT logos that bookend the stenciled name “Rocket Room.”

“That sign is actually what started the whole idea. When I was a student, I was walking around with Tom Trimble [then associate director of the Student Union] in Rocky’s Attic, and this sign was sitting in a corner,” Nichols recalled. “Tom said it was a sign that was hanging in Rocky’s Attic in the 1980s, and he said, ‘We’re probably going to throw it out.’ And I said, ‘No, you’re not.’”

Donovan Nichols' Blue Crew uniform is among the memorabilia featured in the Rocket Room. He and friend Jason Rodriguez started the masked spirited squad when they were undergraduates in 2000.

Donovan Nichols’ Blue Crew uniform is among the memorabilia featured in the Rocket Room. He and friend Jason Rodriguez started the masked spirited squad when they were undergraduates in 2000.

It was 2002 when Nichols rescued the relic and stored it at his parents’ house until now.

“Back then, I said, ‘When I have my own house, I’m going to create a Rocket Room. I’m going to carpet it with field turf and put that sign in it.’”

With a head’s up and permission from Athletics, Nichols snagged pieces of turf in April during the Glass Bowl renovations. Prepping it for installation took most of the summer.

“The turf fibers are about an inch long with about a half inch of infill — sand granules and rubber pellets to make it feel more like real grass — so I had to get all of that infill out,” he said.

The bar in Donovan Nichols' Rocket Room features turf from the blue rocket that was in the center of the field in the Glass Bowl.

The bar in Donovan Nichols’ Rocket Room features turf from the blue rocket that was in the center of the field in the Glass Bowl.

After power-washing and scrubbing the turf, Nichols cut and put pieces together to resemble a field with help from his girlfriend, Alycia Demey; friend and UT alumnus, Rob Bleile; and father, Tom Nichols.

The bar features a piece of the blue rocket from the center of the field. “I was lucky enough to get that piece, so I wanted to showcase it,” Nichols said.

Collecting UT memorabilia started during his undergraduate days when he helped establish a tradition. The year was 2000, and Nichols and his friend, Jason Rodriguez, created Blue Crew.

Bobbleheads of Football Coach Jason Candle and Rocky sit atop the bar.

Bobbleheads of Football Coach Jason Candle and Rocky sit atop the bar.

“Blue Crew’s first game ever was traveling to Penn State. There were four of us that went. About 92,000 people were in the stadium, and only about 2,000 of which were Toledo fans, but we were louder the entire game,” Nichols said pointing to a story about UT’s upset of the Nittany Lions, 24-6. “That was a really cool experience for me because that was the founding of Blue Crew.”

It was the Rocket Fanatic group from the 1990s that inspired Nichols and Rodriguez to start the masked spirited squad. 

“We wanted to create something that emulated the Rocket Fanatic group, but do something that would continue the spirit even after we graduated,” Nichols explained. “So we decided to wear the masks and wigs so we would cloak our identities because it wasn’t about us being the spirited students, it was about having the positive energy and the positive spirit always represented at the University.”

He still radiates that energy and excitement for the Rockets and his alma mater. Standing by his Blue Crew uniform, he said, “My mask is signed by Chester Taylor, who was one of the great UT football players. I have a poster of him and a jersey. He was a running back for the Minnesota Vikings and a couple other NFL teams. I try to pay tribute to some of the players who were around when I was a student because I knew some of them. In the stairwell, there’s a poster of [quarterback] Bruce Gradkowski and [wide receiver] Lance Moore, both who were students when I was around, and I have pictures of them in the NFL as well to display their success.”

A shirt with No. 16 pays tribute to Chuck Ealey, the legendary UT quarterback who led the Rockets to three undefeated seasons from 1969 to 1971.

A shirt with No. 16 pays tribute to Chuck Ealey, the legendary UT quarterback who led the Rockets to three undefeated seasons from 1969 to 1971.

Then there’s a white football shirt with a midnight blue No. 16, which was worn by the quarterback known as the “Wizard of Oohs and Aahs.”

“I wanted to highlight Chuck Ealey because it’s incredible the accomplishment that he had; he’s the only collegiate quarterback in history to go undefeated. From 1969 to 1971, the Rockets went 35-0,” Nichols said. “And he was undefeated in high school, too.”

That sense of history is everywhere in the Rocket Room — the sheet music for “Fair Toledo,” the alma mater, is framed, along with “U of Toledo,” the fight song. Also under glass is the UT Traditions brochure Nichols created after more than 500 hours of research on the school’s history.

“I wanted to walk down memory lane and teach some UT history, and display why people should be proud of The University of Toledo,” he said. “Hopefully, the Rocket Room will inspire more people to show their pride in the institution.”

After graduating with honors with a bachelor of arts degree in communications in 2004 and a master of education degree in higher education in 2006, Nichols stopped to say goodbye to Dr. Kaye M. Patten, senior vice president of student affairs. 

The 2005 GMAC Bowl Championship poster that Dr. Kaye M. Patten, senior vice president of student affairs, gave Donovan Nichols after he graduated and the UT Traditions brochure he created are part of the Rocket Room.

The 2005 GMAC Bowl Championship poster that Dr. Kaye M. Patten, senior vice president of student affairs, gave Donovan Nichols after he graduated and the UT Traditions brochure he created are part of the Rocket Room.

“She went over and took this [2005 GMAC Bowl Championship poster] off her office wall and gave it to me and said she appreciated everything I had done for the University. I was moving to Las Vegas, so it was a piece I took with me. And when I worked in Georgia, it was with me there, and now it’s back with me at home.”

“Donovan was one of the most passionate UT students. He started Blue Crew, created the Rocky doll, was Student Government president,” Patten said. “It’s so nice to have him back where he belongs to inspire that same love for the University in our students.”

“I always thought it would be fun to come back to UT to work, but I didn’t necessarily have a plan to come back. I knew I could show my Rocket pride wherever I went. When I worked in Las Vegas, I created an alumni chapter out there,” he said. “But it feels comfortable in Toledo; I’m home.

“I think if I had a Rocket Room like this in any other city, it wouldn’t be as cool,” he added and laughed. “At least here, a lot of people can come over and see it and appreciate it. Go Rockets!”

A century of preparing educators: Judith Herb College of Education celebrates 100 years

Throughout its history, The University of Toledo has seen its mission as fulfilling the needs of the city. The Judith Herb College of Education has demonstrated this notion for a century.

100 Year_HORIZONTALUT started as a municipal university — The University of the City of Toledo — one of three such institutions in the state. From its earliest years, UT partnered with the University of Ohio in Miami (later called Miami University) to provide a degree and teacher training: Students would attend UT for three years taking classes from faculty in the College of Arts and Sciences followed by one year at Miami. This was in addition to its Bureau of Research and Public Service that housed a Department of Educational Efficiency Service. Its mission was to serve Toledo’s educational organizations as well as the officers and teachers of the schools in the city.

In 1914, the state of Ohio enacted a new law regulating which universities could produce accredited teachers; only those universities on the state “approved” list could do so. Acting quickly, the University president addressed the Board of Directors reporting that local school districts were requesting UT take steps to become approved. Thus, in March 1916, the Board of Directors created the Teachers College of Toledo University. It started with a faculty of four: Josephine Leach, D.W. Henry, A.W. Trettien (who would become the first dean and serve until 1926) and A.M. Stowe.

elementary education association 1936 copyOnce it was fully established, the college moved ahead rapidly, expanding programs and hiring faculty to satisfy the demand for teachers. In 1917, it added a University Evening High School to provide instruction to adults in the community seeking a high school diploma. In 1919, it changed title from Teacher’s College to College of Education. In 1926, David Henry became dean and would hold the position for more than 20 years. During his tenure, the college would stabilize its program but continue to grow in numbers of students and faculty.

Starting in 1927, the college began offering graduate programs in elementary and secondary education. Its undergraduate curriculum had expanded from a dozen courses to more than 30 offerings, balanced between foundational and pedagogical courses. In the mid-1930s, there was talk of an imminent teacher shortage; the College of Education increased its work to try and satisfy this need. By decade’s end, the college sponsored a Demonstration School to put into practice what it taught.

future teacher association 1952 copyThere was a shift in the purpose of schooling nationwide, moving from purely academics to teaching the whole child and schooling for life. As usual, the College of Education kept up with the trends; by the 1940s, there was a rise in vocational education and preparing teachers for the trades of northwest Ohio, physical education, as well as explicitly progressive teaching courses. The college also began offering courses in school administration.

Of course, the decade also saw the horrors of World War II; UT was on the forefront of wartime service offered through its students in all areas. The College of Education joined in by teaching “school the year round” to allow students to matriculate in three years and then enlist with a degree.

As the purpose of schooling expanded and the baby boom created a tremendous need for teachers, by the 1950s, in addition to elementary and high school teachers, the college was producing teachers in vocational education, physical education, business education, home economics and art. The college was experimenting with a series of courses titled Problems in… and Research in…; teachers in the city would partner with a faculty member to work on active research problems impacting daily practice in the classrooms.

Members of the Toledo Student Education Association rode in the 1965 Homecoming parade.

Members of the Toledo Student Education Association rode in the 1965 Homecoming parade.

During that decade, Mary M. Gillham became the head librarian for the University, a position she would hold with pride for years. In fact, Gillham Hall — current home to the Judith Herb College of Education — is named in her honor as the building used to be the library.

As the turmoil of the second half of the 20th century hit the state, the college continued steadfastly producing quality teachers and school administrators throughout the decades. It kept up with the national trends and produced teachers aware of the latest in research and pedagogy.

Education students in 1962

Education students in 1962

After operating as a municipal school for more than 80 years, the University became a state institution in 1967. That big change meant a new name — The University of Toledo — and subsidy for students and state support for capital improvement. Enrollment steadily grew and buildings popped up expanding the campus.

In 2006, a couple months after the University merged with the Medical University of Ohio, UT graduates Judith and Marvin Herb, and their sons, Thomas and Jon, contributed $15 million to fund numerous scholarships as well as educational assessment support and research initiatives in the College of Education. The Herbs designated $8 million of the gift for the Herb Scholars Fund, with another $4.25 million going to support the Herb Research Initiatives Fund, which bonded together researchers with a common interest in learning. The remaining $2.75 million funded the creation of a faculty development and electronic assessment support system fund. Additionally, to recognize the single largest donation in school history, the college was renamed in honor of Judith Herb.

“The University of Toledo’s mission, especially that of the College of Education, was at the heart of our decision to make this pledge,” Judith Herb, a 1961 UT education graduate, said in 2006. “Marvin, our sons and I believe deeply in the power of education. If we can help to make a difference in the lives of some future educators, we are proud to do so.”

Judith Herb talked with students at the Judith Herb College of Education’s 2006 fall welcome picnic.

Judith Herb talked with students at the Judith Herb College of Education’s 2006 fall welcome picnic.

Following two years of major renovations, Gillham Hall, a building that has been a cornerstone of Main Campus since 1952, was rededicated in 2007. The state of Ohio provided $12.4 million in funding for the project. The building’s exterior remained primarily untouched while the interior was completely revamped. Gillham Hall opened fall semester that year with state-of-the-art classrooms that range in capacity from 18 to 40 students; a 75-seat tiered multipurpose auditorium/classroom/meeting room; three technology support center computer labs; a doctoral dissertation presentation/defense conference room; department suites that include student learning community space; and a brick entryway that offers the opportunity to inscribe dedications.

At this moment, the college is anticipating how it can satisfy the needs of 21st century schools in support of the mission of the comprehensive university. It is finding innovative ways to prepare educators for pre-kindergarten through university classrooms, as well as supporting those already teaching by offering programs that include:

Julie Kandel, who was a senior majoring in education in 2007, right, gave a tour of Gillham Hall, the renovated home of the Judith Herb College of Education, to Judith Herb, left, and others. The state provided $12.4 million in funding for the renovation of the building, which was rededicated to the college in a special ceremony in August 2007  following the public tours.

Julie Kandel, who was a senior majoring in education in 2007, right, gave a tour of Gillham Hall, the renovated home of the Judith Herb College of Education, to Judith Herb, left, and others. The state provided $12.4 million in funding for the renovation of the building, which was rededicated to the college in a special ceremony in August 2007 following the public tours.

• Traditional undergraduate programs credentialing teachers in early childhood, elementary, middle childhood, career and technical education, adolescence to young adult education, special education interventionist, as well as the areas of art, foreign language and music;

• Nontraditional certification via LAMP — Licensure and Master’s Program;

• College Credit Plus teacher credentialing programs in biology, chemistry and English;

• Endorsements in reading, preschool special needs, early childhood generalist (grades 4-5), and transition to work;

• Online programs include master’s degrees in educational technology as well as early childhood education, special education, and certificates in virtual educator, peace education, diversity, and educational assessment;

• On-campus certificates in culture and change in institutions and interprofessional teaming in early childhood education;

• Principal and school district leader licensure programs;

• A full slate of master’s, educational specialist and doctoral degrees in all areas, including higher education, to prepare those working in colleges and universities; and

• Innovative centers such as the Center for the Advancement of Professional Learning Communities and Virtual Collaboration, the Center for Education in Targeted Violence and Suicide, the Daso Herb Center for Advanced Research in Education, and the Center for Nonviolence and Democratic Action.

Events slated for College of Education’s centennial anniversary

Ask Dr. Virginia Keil why becoming a teacher is so important.

“The reason is simple. As a teacher, you are more than just an educator, you are a leader, a mentor, a content expert, and so much more,” Keil, interim dean of the Judith Herb College of Education, said. “You have the ability to lead, to inspire, to challenge, and to make a difference in the lives of students. Teachers are advocates and activists. They change the world one student at a time, and their work has an exponential impact.”

100 Year_HORIZONTALA UT alumna, Keil has been doing just that since she joined the faculty in 1989. And she wants to continue paying it forward as the college celebrates its 100th anniversary with a fundraising campaign.

“The College of Education’s $100 for our 100th campaign is focused on raising significant dollars for student scholarships,” she said. “Our deep commitment to provide scholarship opportunities is our way to support our students as they prepare for their futures as educators.”

Those interested in making a donation can go to https://give2ut.utoledo.edu/JHCOE100.asp.

“As the Judith Herb College of Education embarks on its second century, it’s time to once again look ahead,” Keil said. “The vision of the college is to shape the future of education in an ever-changing world. We invite education alumni and students to participate in the events planned for our 100th anniversary.”

Listed by date, events include:

Wednesday and Thursday, Oct. 12 and 13

• Homecoming/Anniversary Ice Cream Social, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Gillham Hall Lobby on the third floor. Stop by for a sweet treat and a free Judith Herb College of Education anniversary T-shirt.

Saturday, Oct. 15

• Judith Herb College of Education Parade Reception, 9 a.m., tent on north side of Gillham Hall. In celebration of the college’s 100th anniversary, join education alumni to march in the Homecoming Parade by a special float created for the occasion by UT faculty and staff.

• College of Education Open House, noon, Gillham Hall Lobby on the third floor. Check out the college, meet faculty and staff, learn about programs and tour Gillham Hall.

In November, a forum on “Diversity in Classrooms: Pre-K Through University” will be held. This discussion of race, discipline, the graduation of African-American students, and the diversity of the teaching profession is sponsored by the Judith Herb College of Education and the Office of Diversity.

A film screening and lecture also are planned for spring semester.

For more information, call 419.530.2491 or email richard.welsch@utoledo.edu.

Alumna donates $1 million to UT to support teacher education

A $1 million donation from a two-time graduate of The University of Toledo Judith Herb College of Education will support generations of future teachers.

Janet Keller, who received a bachelor of education degree in 1960 and a master of education degree in 1964, said she made the gift “because I love the University.”

UT alumna Janet Keller and her husband, the Rev. Gerald Keller

UT alumna Janet Keller and her husband, the Rev. Gerald Keller

The former high school Spanish teacher said she and her husband, the Rev. Gerald Keller, were inspired to advance the college’s strong reputation as it celebrates its 100th anniversary.

“We wanted to do something to help others,” Keller said. “I had a wonderful career as a teacher, and I want to help others have that opportunity. We want to see more students become good teachers.”

This $1 million gift builds upon previous generosity from the Kellers, who in 1985 set up the A. Martin and Ruth Zucker Fund in memory of her parents to support student scholarships and other priorities of the Judith Herb College of Education.

“The thank-you notes from the students are a delight to both of us — even my husband who is not a graduate of The University of Toledo,” Keller said. “The notes have been overwhelming. It says a lot about the UT students and the culture.”

“The generosity of the Keller family will not only benefit our students here in the Judith Herb College of Education, but also the future students they touch as educators for an impact that will last generations,” said Dr. Virginia Keil, interim dean of the college. “I cannot think of a more exciting way to celebrate 100 years of our college than for a graduate to make this type of gift to support our strong future.”

Keller said she was inspired by others who have made donations to the University and hopes that their gift will motivate more people to invest in the future of UT’s students.

“I certainly want those who need that extra support through a scholarship to have the opportunity to continue their education,” she said. “It’s such an important investment.”

As part of the college’s 100-year anniversary, a student scholarship drive launched this month to engage alumni in supporting future educators.

“The Kellers’ generosity is a fantastic example of the loyalty and generosity of UT alumni, and the important role that graduates play in supporting current and future students,” UT President Sharon L. Gaber said. “We are grateful for this gift and the Kellers’ willingness to tell their story to inspire others to follow their lead and contribute to the University’s future.”

High school teachers take chemistry lab classes at UT for College Credit Plus training

It may be summer vacation, but a group of teachers from school districts across Ohio is spending the week as students with goggles, beakers and chemicals in a science lab at The University of Toledo.

Since March, UT has been training dozens of high school teachers through online classes to teach college courses in biology, chemistry or English as part of an expansion of the statewide College Credit Plus Program.

college credit plus logoOhio’s College Credit Plus Program allows seventh- through 12th-grade students to earn high school credit and college credit at the same time for free.

19 high school teachers have been working online to earn qualifications to teach college-level chemistry in their classrooms. 16 of them will be on Main Campus this week for lab classes with UT instructors.

The chemistry students are teachers from Toledo Public Schools, Belleaire City Schools, Celina City Schools, Centerburg Local Schools, Copley-Fairlawn City Schools, East Muskingum Local Schools, Fayetteville-Perry Local Schools, Findlay City Schools, Indian Valley Local Schools, Lakota Local Schools, Morgan Local Schools, Shadyside Local Schools, Triway Local Schools and Steubenville High School.

English and biology students will take classes on Main Campus at the end of July.

Last year the Ohio Department of Education and the Ohio Department of Higher Education awarded UT $769,000 in grants to develop programs and pay for up to 40 high school teachers to earn a master’s degree needed to teach college-level chemistry, biology or English courses in their high school classrooms.

“By credentialing dozens of high school teachers in our area to teach college courses, we are expanding higher education opportunities for more children,” said Dr. Rebecca Schneider, professor and chair of UT’s Department of Curriculum and Instruction in the Judith Herb College of Education.

The teachers who began the 18-month program in March are expected to begin teaching College Credit Plus courses in fall 2017.

Smithsonian museum director and physicist to address UT graduates May 7

Leaders with a passion for diversity and science who have uplifted Americans through the arts, public service and higher education will address graduates at The University of Toledo’s spring commencement ceremonies Saturday, May 7, in Savage Arena.

During the 9:30 a.m. ceremony, former U.S. Congressman and physicist Dr. Rush D. Holt, who leads the world’s largest multidisciplinary scientific and engineering society, will speak to graduates from the colleges of Adult and Lifelong Learning, Health Sciences, Social Justice and Human Service, and the Judith Herb College of Education.

Dr. Johnnetta Cole, director of the Smithsonian National Museum of African Art and the first African-American female president of Spelman College, will speak at the 2 p.m. ceremony for the colleges of Business and Innovation, Communication and the Arts, Natural Sciences and Mathematics, and Languages, Literature and Social Sciences.

There are 2,843 candidates for degrees: 234 doctoral candidates, 727 master’s, education specialist and graduate certificate candidates, and 1,882 bachelor’s and associate’s candidates.

The ceremony will be streamed live on video.utoledo.edu.

Holt

Holt

Holt, who will receive an honorary doctor of public service degree during the morning ceremony, is the chief executive officer of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and executive publisher of the Science family of journals.

He served eight terms as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from New Jersey’s 12th Congressional District. During his time on Capitol Hill from 1999 to 2015, Holt advocated for increased federal research funding, science education and innovation. Holt made national headlines in 2011 when he defeated IBM’s supercomputer Watson in a non-televised round of “Jeopardy!”

Holt previously served as assistant director of Princeton University’s Plasma Physics Laboratory, one of the largest alternative energy research facilities in the country.

Cole

Cole

Cole, who will receive an honorary doctor of humane letters degree during the afternoon ceremony, made history nearly 30 years ago as the first African-American female president of Spelman College in Atlanta. She later served as president of Bennett College for Women, making Cole the only person who has been president of both historically black colleges for women in the United States.

She also was the first woman elected to the board of Coca-Cola Enterprises. She was the first African American to serve as chair of the board of the United Way of America.

Other commencement ceremonies taking place are:

• College of Engineering — graduate commencement Thursday, May 5, at 5 p.m., and undergraduate commencement Saturday, May 7, at 3 p.m. Both ceremonies will be held in Nitschke Hall Auditorium.

• College of Nursing — Friday, May 6, at 1 p.m. in Savage Arena.

• College of Law — Sunday, May 8, at 1 p.m. in the Student Union Auditorium.

• College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences — Sunday, May 8, at 10 a.m. in Savage Arena.

• College of Medicine and Life Sciences — Friday, May 27, at 2 p.m. in the Stranahan Theater, 4645 Heatherdowns Blvd., Toledo.

For more information, visit utoledo.edu/commencement.

Open forums slated for graduate studies dean candidates

Three finalists have been selected from the internal search for a new dean for the College of Graduate Studies.

They are:

• Dr. Laurie Dinnebeil, Distinguished University Professor and chair of the Department of Early Childhood and Special Education in the Judith Herb College of Education;

• Dr. Amanda Bryant-Friedrich, associate professor of medicinal and biological chemistry, associate professor of chemistry, and director of international pharmaceutical sciences graduate student retention and recruitment in the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences; and

• Dr. Patrick Lawrence, professor and chair of geography and planning in the College of Languages, Literature and Social Sciences.

The UT campus community is invited to meet the candidates at open forums.

Listed by date, the open forums will be:

• Friday, April 29 — Dinnebeil from 9 to 9:45 a.m. in Health Education Building Room 105 on Health Science Campus and from 11 to 11:45 a.m. in Student Union Room 2592 on Main Campus.

• Monday, May 2 — Lawrence from 9 to 9:45 a.m. in Health Education Building Room 105 on Health Science Campus and from 11 to 11:45 a.m. in Student Union Room 2582 on Main Campus.

• Thursday, May 5 — Bryant-Friedrich from 9 to 9:45 a.m. in Health Education Building Room 105 on Health Science Campus and from 11 to 11:45 a.m. in Student Union Room 2582 on Main Campus.

Curriculum vitaes are available for each candidate at utoledo.edu/offices/provost/search-dean-graduate.

“We are looking for someone to lead our graduate and professional programs to become even more nationally distinguished and highly ranked,” Dr. William Messer, vice president for research and chair of the search committee, said. “The next dean also will be charged with continuing and growing UT’s emphasis on graduate student research.”

The University has 128 master’s degree programs and 40 doctoral programs in 12 colleges. In addition to those degrees, the University offers professional doctorates and master’s degrees, as well as a variety of certificates in health care, business and personal enrichment areas.

Faculty members receive promotion, tenure

A number of faculty members received tenure and promotion for the 2016-17 academic year approved April 18 by the UT Board of Trustees.

Faculty members who received tenure and promotion to associate professor are:

College of Business and Innovation

• Dr. Mai Dao, Accounting
• Dr. Anthony Holder, Accounting
• Dr. Yue Zhang, Operations and Technology Management

Judith Herb College of Education

• Dr. Victoria Stewart, Curriculum and Instruction

College of Languages, Literature and Social Sciences

• Dr. Gaby Semaan, Foreign Languages
• Dr. Benjamin Stroud, English Language

College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics

• Dr. Malathi Krishnamurthy, Biological Sciences
• Dr. Rong Liu, Mathematics and Statistics

College of Social Justice and Human Service

• Dr. Wendi Goodlin-Fahncke, Criminal Justice and Social Work
• Dr. Debra Harmening, School Psychology, Higher Education and Counselor Education

The faculty member who received tenure and promotion to professor is:

College of Law
• Kara Bruce

The faculty member who received tenure is:

College of Law
• Gregory Gilchrist, associate professor

Faculty members promoted to professor are:

College of Communication and the Arts
• Dr. Timothy Brakel, Music

Judith Herb College of Education

• Dr. Svetlana Beltyukova, Educational Foundations and Leadership
• Dr. Judy Lambert, Curriculum and Instruction

College of Engineering
• Dr. Duane Hixon, Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering
• Dr. Douglas Nims, Civil Engineering

Jesup W. Scott Honors College
• Dr. Barbara Mann

College of Languages, Literature and Social Sciences

• Dr. Linda Rouillard, Foreign Languages

College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics

• Dr. Peter Andreana, Chemistry and Biochemistry
• Dr. Jonathan Bossenbroek, Environmental Sciences
• Dr. Rupali Chandar, Physics and Astronomy
• Dr. Joseph Schmidt, Chemistry and Biochemistry

College of Social Justice and Human Service

• Dr. Richard Johnson, Criminal Justice and Social Work

The faculty member promoted to associate professor is:

College of Law
• Bryan Lammon

The faculty member promoted to associate clinical professor is:

College of Health Sciences
• Dr. Lynne Chapman, Rehabilitation Sciences

Peace studies talks to be held April 12-14

Since the initiation of the Peace Education Initiative at The University of Toledo, the city has become a hub for peace education.

To supplement the growth, Dr. Betty A. Reardon will visit Toledo Tuesday, April 12, through Thursday, April 14, for three public events.

peace postcardAs the founder and director of the International Institute on Peace Education, a weeklong residential experience for educators facilitating the exchange of ideas surrounding peace education, Reardon is known as the “Mother of Peace Education.” She will host conversations with students, faculty and community members about peace education, how it’s being implemented in Toledo, and ideas on how to further utilize it in the community.

“My belief is peace studies and peace education are the most significant issues for universities to address,” Reardon said. “We need to start looking at these fields and how [they] can address major crises.”

The events will be:

• Public Dialogue — Tuesday, April 12, at 7 p.m. in Health and Human Services Building Room 1711; light refreshments will be served.

• Lunchtime Dialogue — Wednesday, April 13, at 12:30 p.m. in Health and Human Services Building Room 1711; this event is geared toward students. Lunch will be served.

• Faculty and Staff Dialogue — Thursday, April 14, at 1 p.m. in Student Union Room 2591.

The free, public platforms are meant to be informal conversations about how peace education works and how it can be used effectively, Reardon explained. The events are sponsored and coordinated by the Graduate Student Association with the support of the Peace Education Initiative.
Reardon also founded the Peace Education Center at Columbia University, taught at universities around the world, and has experience both in formal school settings and community-based education programs. Throughout her career, she has advanced peace and global citizenship education through a focus on human security, human rights, sustainable development, ecology and gender.

Additionally, she received special honorary mention from the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization Peace Education Prize for establishing the International Institute on Peace Education. She also received the 2010 Sean McBride Peace Prize and was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize in 2013.

The Peace Education Initiative in UT’s Judith Herb College of Education was established to help the University become a global leader in peace education. Last month, UT’s Faculty Senate approved a new peace studies major and minor. The minor is tentatively set to launch this fall. 

“I’m very excited about what’s happening in Toledo,” Reardon said. “UT is poised to be a new leading peace learning institution for the country and internationally.”

The Peace Education Initiative also oversees the Betty A. Reardon Archives, which is housed in UT’s Canaday Center for Special Collections. The collection consists of Reardon’s extensive publications, unpublished manuscripts, curriculum, reports, scholarly presentations, and correspondence from the 1960s to the present about peace studies. Her archives have been in the Canaday Center since 2009.

Individuals can RSVP at utoledo.edu/education/peace/RSVP.html.

To learn more about the Peace Education Initiative and its programs, visit utoledo.edu/education/peace.

For more information, contact Dr. Tony Jenkins, director of the UT Peace Education Initiative, at tony.jenkins@utoledo.edu.