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Exhibit explores ‘Where Lights Goes’

A three-artist exhibit titled “Where the Light Goes” is on display in the Center for the Visual Arts Gallery on the Toledo Museum of Art Campus. 

In its 2nd iteration, “Where the Light Goes” deepens its exploration of contemporary approaches to the photographic image through the examination of its physical properties, the possibilities of its reproduction, its vulnerability, and its uncertainty as an instrument of truth.

“Backyard” by Trisha Holt

On Friday, Feb. 2, Dr. Robin Reisenfeld, curator of works on paper for the Toledo Museum of Art, will moderate a panel discussion featuring the exhibit’s artists: Trisha Holt, Ben Schonberger and Eric Zeigler. Brian Carpenter, UT lecturer of art and gallery director, also will participate in the discussion, which will be held at 6 p.m. in the Toledo Museum of Art Little Theater.

“Framework: Remainder 1” by Ben Schonberger

Holt works with printed photographs to dismantle the image plane. Her bodies of work center around the themes of feminist performance art, the history of cinema, and the aesthetics of serial killers. Her work is at the intersection of performance art and large-scale collage that exist as framed photographs, videos and installations.

Schonberger is a visual artist and lecturer of photography at Point Park University in Pittsburgh. Utilizing photography, appropriated imagery, collage, performance and sculpture, his work examines the complexities of identity through long-term social investigations and archive augmentation processes.

Zeigler is a photographer based in Maumee, Ohio. As an associate lecturer in the UT Art Department, Zeigler teaches photography, digital media and tools.

“False Martian Regolith” by Eric Zeigler

The free, public exhibition will be on display through Friday, Feb. 16. Gallery hours are Monday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.

For more information on the exhibition, contact Carpenter, at brian.carpenter@utoledo.edu.

UT Department of Art offers lunchtime workshops

The Department of Art will offer workshops for UT employees and students throughout spring semester on Main and Health Science campuses.

Each workshop is composed of two 45-minute sessions. The cost is $30 per workshop.

Dr. Mark Sherry, professor of sociology, participated in a brown-bag art workshop last semester and tried his hand at wood burning.

The seven workshops that will be offered this semester are:

• Hand sewing — basic hand-stitching techniques, embroidery and cross-stitching.

• Paper craft plus — the art of book making, page flowers, wall flowers, and beading/jewelry.

• Painting — paint on variety of surfaces such as rocks, watercolor book pages, mugs and mini acrylic canvases.

• Upcycling — re-purposing of a variety of objects for T-shirt tote, cookie sheet magnet board, map tile coasters and art.

• Polymer clay — magnets, pendants, earrings and pens.

• Glass — painting on glass, sea glass wind chime, votive holder and alcohol ink pendants.

• Wood burning — line work and shading techniques.

Workshops will begin Monday, Jan. 22. For a complete schedule, visit utoledo.edu/al/svpa/art/galleries/artworkshops.html.

Sessions on Main Campus will take place in the conference room on the first floor of Sullivan Hall, and workshops on Health Science Campus will be held in Collier Building Rooms 2410/2412.

Alissa Cox, an independent artist since 2006, will present the workshops.

Coming from a family of artisans and artists, Cox grew up learning woodcrafts, stained glass, blacksmithing, jewelry craft, quilting and painting. She moved her business, Smoky Grove, to Ohio in 2012 and has exhibited at Columbus Winterfair, the Great Lakes Jazz Festival and the Black Swamp Arts Festival. Cox has taught several workshops in pyrography, sewing and painting.

In addition, a crochet workshop will be held each Friday in Sullivan Hall on Main Campus. Open to crotchetiers of every skill level — from beginners to pros — this workshop is an opportunity to learn new techniques or get help on a project. Each session is $10 and can be paid at the door. No reservations are required.

Auditions for UT jazz Vocalstra slated

Do you like to sing jazz? Audition for the University’s Vocalstra, a vocal jazz ensemble founded by legendary singer Jon Hendricks.

This ensemble performs a variety of repertoire, including jazz standards, blues, vocalese (a genre of jazz singing in which words are set to instrumental recordings), and other contemporary genres.

Dr. Ellie Martin directs Vocalstra during a rehearsal last fall.

Auditions will be held Wednesday, Jan. 17, and Monday, Jan. 22, from 4 to 7 p.m. in Center for Performing Arts Room 1017.

Singers should prepare a song, preferably in the jazz style if possible.

Auditions will be held in 10-minute increments. Students of all majors are invited to sign up for a time here.

“We are searching for new, passionate and committed members,” said Dr. Ellie Martin, instructor in the UT Music Department and co-director of Vocalstra.

Students who have a conflict with the audition times or who have questions should contact Martin at lee.martin@utoledo.edu.

Professor honored for pioneering academic contributions

Dr. David Nemeth, UT professor in the Department of Geography and Planning, has received the second annual Kevin O’Donnell Distinguished Friend of Korea Award.

The Friend of Korea Award is dedicated to enhancing cultural awareness and friendship between Americans and Koreans and was founded in 2002 by former Peace Corps volunteers who served in Korea between 1966 and 1981.

Nemeth

Nemeth spent two years on Jeju Island off the southern coast of South Korea with the Peace Corps in 1972. After returning to the United States, he pursued researching, publishing and teaching about Korea.

“I formed a mystical attachment to Jeju Island and a fictive kinship with its inhabitants during my Peace Corps years of service,” Nemeth said. “In addition, I found a moral compass there.

“After Peace Corps, my in-depth studies of Jeju Island, highlighted by many return visits, became a rewarding intellectual obsession that I vigorously pursued while earning my PhD at UCLA.”

Nemeth’s research focuses on cultural geographic studies in Korea, which include diverse yet related explorations into Neo-Confucianism, geomancy, economic-growth ideology and agricultural ecology.

In 1987, Nemeth published a book titled “The Architecture of Ideology: Neo-Confucian Imprinting on Cheju Island, Korea,” which has since been translated into Korean.

“This award in general draws international scholarly and public attention to the profound significance of Korean civilization on the world stage, past, present and future,” Nemeth said. “More specifically, my award celebrates the uniqueness and worth of Jeju Island’s remarkable landscape and culture within Korea.”

‘I Got a Lust for Life’ to reflect impact of African-American Great Migration on region

A one-day public program that begins in Detroit and finishes in Toledo will explore the impact of the African-American Great Migration on literary and musical expression in northwest Ohio and southeast Michigan.

The program, “I Got a Lust for Life: The Unique Words and Sounds of Northwest Ohio and Southeast Michigan,” will include panel discussions, poetry readings and musical performances on Saturday, Jan. 20, in Detroit at Wayne State University and in Toledo at the Toledo Lucas County Public Library and Toledo Museum of Art. Buses will shuttle participants between the events in the two cities.

The program will begin in Detroit with a 10 a.m. panel discussion at Wayne State University’s Schaver Music Recital Hall. The panel will include Ben Blackwell, co-founder of Third Man Records and official archivist for the White Stripes; John Gibbs Rockwood, Toledo author of the 2014 book “Can I Get a Witness” that features his photographs of iconic rock, pop, blues and folk musicians performing in the region during the early 1970s through the 2000s; Ramona Collins, Toledo-based popular jazz singer; and Oliver Ragsdale Jr., president of the Carr Center, a community hub for African-American artistic expression in Detroit.

The discussion, which will be moderated by Dr. Kimberly Mack, assistant professor of African-American literature at The University of Toledo, and Dr. Joshua S. Duchan, associate professor of music at Wayne State University, will be followed by a musical performance and question-and-answer session.

“I Got a Lust for Life” then will move to Toledo, where Tyehimba Jess will perform a poetry reading and hold a book signing at 2:30 p.m. in the McMaster Center of the Toledo Lucas County Public Library. Jess is a 2017 Pulitzer Prize-winning poet from Detroit whose work has focused on music, biography and African-American history. He will read from “Olio,” his award-winning collection of poetry that weaves together sonnet, song and narrative to examine the lives of mostly unrecorded, African-American performers from the Civil War to World War I.

The program will conclude with a 6 p.m. panel discussion in the Glass Pavilion of the Toledo Museum of Art with Jess; M.L. Liebler, a Detroit-based, award-winning poet and editor of the anthology “Heaven Was Detroit: From Jazz to Hip-Hop and Beyond”; Frances Brockington, associate professor of voice at Wayne State University; and Dr. Lee Ellen Martin, jazz vocalist and Jon Hendricks scholar. Mack and Duchan will moderate the discussion, which also will be followed by a musical performance and question-and-answer session.

“I Got a Lust for Life: The Unique Words and Sounds of Northwest Ohio and Southeast Michigan” is sponsored by the Roger Ray Institute for the Humanities at The University of Toledo, which advocates for and supports the study of human culture — from a great variety of fields — at all levels of learning and scholarship. Additional support for the program is provided by UT, WSU, the Toledo Lucas County Public Library, Toledo.com and the Toledo Museum of Art.

For more information, click here.

UT Music Department reaching out to youth in community

The University of Toledo Department of Music Community Music Program will be adding two community ensembles — the Children’s Choir of Northwest Ohio and the UT Youth Jazz Orchestra.

The Children’s Choir of Northwest Ohio is an existing community group that will come under the wing of the UT Community Music Program, while the Youth Jazz Orchestra is a new creation.

Wolkins

The UT Youth Jazz Orchestra will be directed by Ben Wolkins, jazz trumpet instructor at the University. Interested high school students should sign up online here and attend the informational meeting with their parents Wednesday, Jan. 24, at 6:30 p.m. in the Center for Performing Arts Room 2024. Free parking will be available in lot 12 across the street from the Center for Performing Arts.

The cost to participate in the UT Youth Jazz Orchestra is $60, which covers all music and instruction. No fees are due until the first rehearsal, which will be held Wednesday, Jan. 31. Read more here.

Dr. Jason Stumbo, UT associate professor and chair of music, said there has been great interest in a community ensemble in jazz for high school students.

“We also have tremendously talented jazz faculty and a solid program in which community ensembles can flourish, our Community Music Program. So, we felt this was great fit for us,” Stumbo said. “We’re excited to bring this jazz performance opportunity to the youth in our community.”

The Children’s Choir of Northwest Ohio

Stumbo added the founder and current director of the Children’s Choir of Northwest Ohio, Lisa Allemen, is retiring from her post, but will continue through this spring, after which a new director will be hired.

Founded in 2006 by Allemen, the Children’s Choir of Northwest Ohio is a community-based treble voice children’s chorus open to all youth in grades three through 10 in the area. The program’s mission is to provide an enrichment experience for those children who have a talent and interest in singing and desire an opportunity to sing in a children’s choir.  More information about the choir and how to join can be found here.

Read more about the UT Department of Music Community Music Program here.

For more information on the UT Youth Jazz Orchestra or the Children’s Choir of Northwest Ohio, contact Stumbo at jason.stumbo@utoledo.edu or 419.530.2448.

Freeze frame: New book offers pictorial history of UT

There are 240 photos packed into the 128 pages of “University of Toledo.”

That’s a lot of pictures telling many stories in the new book by Barbara Floyd. Part of Arcadia Publishing’s Campus History Series, the work takes a look back at The University of Toledo.

Barbara Floyd holds her new book, “University of Toledo.”

“This book would not have been possible without the incredible images preserved in university archives created by photographers known and unknown,” Floyd said. “The Ward M. Canaday Center for Special Collections houses more than 15,000 UT images, and sifting through them to decide what to include in this book was a labor of love.”

Floyd was the perfect person to curate the book. She retired last month as director of the Canaday Center, where she worked 31 years, initially as university archivist and later also as director of special collections for 20 years.

And she is a UT alumna. She received a bachelor of arts degree in journalism, a master of arts degree in American history, and a master’s degree in public administration from the University.

“The University of Toledo changed my life,” Floyd said. “Having the chance to pay tribute to this beloved institution that means so much to so many was a wonderful opportunity.”

The pictorial review starts with one man who had a vision: Jesup W. Scott believed Toledo could be the “Future Great City of the World.”

“As a real estate investor, Jesup Scott saw the location of Toledo on railroad lines, on the Great Lakes, and near farmland as the elements of a future industrial powerhouse,” Floyd said. “And that future great city would need a university.”

Scott donated 160 acres of land to serve as an endowment for the Toledo University of Arts and Trade. While the school failed, it was resurrected in 1884 by Scott’s sons, who gave the remaining assets to the city to create a manual training school.

“By 1909, the institution was becoming a full-fledged university, but struggled financially and needed a permanent location,” Floyd said.

When Dr. Henry J. Doermann became president of the University in 1928, he began planning for a new campus. A $2.8 million bond levy was passed that November, less than one year before the Great Depression.

A photo shows Doermann at the 1929 groundbreaking ceremony for University Hall.

“President Doermann selected the Collegiate Gothic design elements of the great universities of Europe because he wanted the architecture to inspire students,” Floyd said.

University Hall with its iconic tower and dual courtyards continues to be one of the most photographed landmarks in Toledo.

Images chronicle the University’s growing campus and burgeoning student life, which flourished even more when UT joined Ohio’s higher education system in 1967.

“The focus of this book is on the major events that shaped the University,” Floyd said. “It celebrates the University’s growth as an institution.”

There was a lot to celebrate in 2006 when UT merged with the Medical University of Ohio. At the time, it was estimated the new entity would have a $1.1 billion impact on Ohio’s economy.

A few pages also commemorate when UT was in the national spotlight. A smiling Chuck Ealey, the quarterback known as the “Wizard of Oohs and Aahs” who led the Rockets to a 35-0 record from 1969 to 1972, is in the book, along with a shot of the men’s basketball team playing Indiana in the inaugural game in Centennial Hall, now called Savage Arena. UT won, 59-57, with a basket at the buzzer to end the Hoosiers’ 33-game winning streak. And the women’s basketball team is shown celebrating its 2011 WNIT Championship.

Floyd gave credit to the late longtime UT photographer Bill Hartough, MCO photographer Jack Meade, and current University photographer Daniel Miller: “Their keen eyes captured events big and small, as well as campus life.”

“University of Toledo” is $21.99 and available at the Barnes & Noble University Bookstore and online book retailers.

Fewer toys lead to richer play experiences, UT researchers find

Any parent knows how toys seem to magically multiply and take over a house. Do children need so many toys?

A team of University of Toledo researchers studied whether the number of toys in a toddler’s environment influenced their quality of play. Their findings: Less is definitely more when it comes to creative, healthy play.

Research by Dr. Carly Dauch, left, and Dr. Alexia Metz found less is definitely more when it comes to toys and toddlers’ creative, healthy play.

The results of the study come just in time for family and friends who are picking up holiday gifts for the children in their lives. The research, which will appear in the February issue of Infant Behavior and Development, suggests that an abundance of toys may create a distraction. Fewer new toys might be a better route this holiday season.

When toddlers had exposure to fewer toys, they played twice as long with the toys they had and in more sophisticated ways, said Dr. Alexia Metz, the study’s lead investigator and a UT associate professor of occupational therapy.

As the mother of 12-year-old twins, Metz has personal experience with the proliferation of toys phenomenon.

“I was astonished by how much our home filled up with stuff,” she said. “I wondered whether there was any risk to having that much stuff.”

Metz said she also had observed people worrying whether their toddlers had attention deficit disorder. Toddlers, by nature, are distractible, but she wondered whether their environment might be a factor in how they played or how easily distracted they were.

Metz and her team of graduate students studied 36 toddlers from 18 to 30 months of age. The children visited the playroom lab twice. On one visit, the children played in a room with just four toys; on the other, they had access to 16 toys.

The team charted how many times the toddler picked up a toy; how long they played with it; and how many ways they played with it.

“When there were fewer toys, they played with them in more ways,” Metz said.

In the 16-toy environment, many of the children played with 10 or more toys in the 15 minutes soon after they entered the room. By flitting from toy to toy, they didn’t take the time to explore the ways they could use each toy, Metz said.

Fewer toys led to “higher quality play,” meaning the toddler stuck with the toy for longer and played with it in more creative ways. Instead of stacking or tipping a toy, they began to hammer with it or feed it or hide it. This increased exploration may support development of motor and cognitive skills.

“Today there is the demand to have the latest and greatest toy that encourages a more technological mind. In this study, we used older toys that encouraged more creative play and tested the theory of is less really more?” said Dr. Carly Dauch, who graduated from UT in May following the completion of the study and is now an occupational therapist at the Wood County Board of Developmental Disabilities. “How the children played supported our hypothesis and provides support for deeper and richer play with fewer toys.”

Michelle Imwalle and Brooke Ocasio, who also graduated in May, were the other graduate students involved in the project.

The bottom line for parents: “If your child receives an abundance of toys, you don’t need to introduce them all at once,” Metz said. “Save some for later and swap them out. If they have a chance to explore a few toys at a time, they might have a richer experience.”

This is also good news for families who may feel guilty for not being able to shower their children with dozens of toys.

“They’re not depriving their children of an opportunity for meaningful play,” Metz said. “This is a less is more story.”

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist to deliver UT commencement address Dec. 17

Toledo native and Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Michael D. Sallah will return to his alma mater Sunday, Dec. 17, to deliver the keynote address during The University of Toledo’s fall commencement ceremony.

The event will begin at 10 a.m. in Savage Arena.

Sallah

Sallah will address 2,067 candidates for degrees, including 118 doctoral, 523 master’s, 1,370 bachelor’s and 56 associate’s.

The ceremony is open to the public and can be viewed live at video.utoledo.edu.

Sallah’s investigative work as a reporter and editor with award-winning newspapers across the country has revealed public corruption, police abuses and government blunders, resulting in grand jury investigations, legislative reform, and the recovery of millions of taxpayer dollars.

He is a reporter on the national investigations team at USA Today/Gannett Network in Washington, D.C.

“This is where it all began for me,” Sallah said. “From the time I took my first journalism class in the fall of my freshman year, I fell in love with journalism, and UT is a big part of that. It’s part of my foundation — the professors, the values they conveyed to me about journalism, and why it’s so critical to our society, especially investigative work. I’m honored to be coming home to be the commencement speaker.”

“Journalists have an important role to inform the public about the issues that affect our lives, and Michael Sallah has embraced that responsibility uncovering many misdeeds through investigative reporting that resulted in positive change,” UT President Sharon L. Gaber said. “I look forward to him sharing with our graduates how he got his start here in Toledo and inspiring them to stay curious and serve their communities.”

Born in Toledo, Sallah is a 1977 alumnus of The University of Toledo, graduating cum laude with a bachelor of arts degree in journalism. He was named UT’s Outstanding Alumnus in the Social Sciences in 2004. Sallah also is a 1973 graduate of St. John’s Jesuit High School.

He was a reporter and national affairs writer at The Blade for more than a decade, and was the lead reporter on the 2003 project “Buried Secrets, Brutal Truths” that exposed the U.S. Army’s longest war crimes case of the Vietnam War. The series won numerous national awards, including the 2004 Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting.

While investigations editor and reporter at the Miami Herald, Sallah led an inquiry into local corruption. His team’s 2006 “House of Lies” series exposed widespread fraud in Miami-Dade County public housing and earned the 2007 Pulitzer Prize for Local Reporting. He was named a 2012 Pulitzer Prize finalist for his series “Neglected to Death,” which uncovered deadly conditions in Florida assisted-living facilities, led to the closing of 13 facilities, and was the impetus for a gubernatorial task force to overhaul state law.

During his two years at The Washington Post, Sallah received a Robert F. Kennedy Award for Excellence in Journalism for an investigation that exposed a predatory system of tax collection in the District of Columbia. 

He returned to the Miami Herald in 2014 and was named a Pulitzer Prize finalist in 2016 for uncovering one of the nation’s most corrupt sting operations in a police unit that laundered $71.5 million for drug cartels, kept millions for brokering the deals, and failed to make a single significant arrest. 

Sallah is the author of the books “Tiger Force: A True Story of Men and War” and “Yankee Comandante: The Untold Story of Courage, Passion and One American’s Fight to Liberate Cuba.” He also was a consultant for the Public Broadcasting Service documentary “American Experience.”

UT’s fall commencement ceremony will recognize graduates from the colleges of Arts and Letters; Business and Innovation; Judith Herb College of Education; Engineering; Graduate Studies; Health and Human Services; Honors College; Natural Sciences and Mathematics; Nursing; and Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences; and University College.

For more information, visit utoledo.edu/commencement.

UT groups to collect canned goods at Dec. 6 concert

The UT Symphonic Band and Wind Ensemble will perform Wednesday, Dec. 6, at 7 p.m. in Doermann Theater.

The program will feature a mix of holiday and secular music.

While the concert is free, members of the ensembles will accept canned and nonperishable food items at the event. Monetary donations also will be welcomed.

All donations will be distributed to local food banks.

For more information, call the UT Department of Music at 419.530.2448.