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Undergraduates to showcase research, creative projects

Does the caffeine in eye cream affect skin’s appearance? Does boxing help with speech for those living with Parkinson’s disease? How are feminist theories explored in “The Handmaid’s Tale”? These are a few of the questions UT students are tackling for the annual Scholars Celebration.

The Scholars Celebration showcases the diverse and dynamic undergraduate research, scholarship and creative activities at The University of Toledo. Presented by the Office of Undergraduate Research and University Libraries, the event includes student presentations and displays from all disciplines.

A welcome ceremony will be held Monday, Dec. 3, at 3 p.m. in Carlson Library Room 1005 and offer an opportunity to engage with students about their academic accomplishments. Exhibits are on display from Thursday, Nov. 29, through Friday, Dec. 7, in the Carlson Library Concourse.

“This is the fourth year of this event, and each year it grows,” said Dr. Jon Bossenbroek, director of the Office of Undergraduate Research and professor of environmental sciences. “This year, I’m most excited about the increased participation of students from the College of Arts and Letters, as we have students from art, anthropology and English presenting their work.”

The Scholars Celebration fosters engagement with the campus community, bringing together students, faculty and staff from across the University to talk, be proud and celebrate the accomplishments of its students. This year will feature art displays titled “The Trees Never Bend” and “Glitched Memory,” among others.

“The Scholars Celebration has been a rewarding experience that has allowed me to share my research and receive valuable feedback from both students and faculty members,” Nathan Szymanski, a senior majoring in physics, said. “It’s also been great to meet others and learn about the fascinating work being done throughout many diverse fields here at UT.”

Concerts to feature choirs, orchestra

The University of Toledo Department of Music will present two choral concerts in December.

On Saturday, Dec. 1, the Chamber Singers will perform with the UT Symphony Orchestra at 8 p.m. at Corpus Christi Parish on Dorr Street, across from Main Campus.

Selections to be performed will be “Funeral Music for Queen Mary” by Purcell and Stucky; “The Rumor of a Secret King” by John Mackey; “Da Pacem, Domine” by Peteris Vasks; “Dance of the Tumblers” from “The Snow Maiden” by Rimsky-Korsakov; “Fun and Games” by Dr. Lee Heritage, UT associate professor of music; “Alleluia Laus et Gloria” by Tarik O’Regan; and “Cantata in Nativitate Domini” by Rihards Dubra.

On Friday, Dec. 7, the UT Rocket Choristers and the Glee Club will perform along with the Children’s Choir of Northwest Ohio. The concert will be at 7 p.m. in Doermann Theatre.

The concert will feature a blend of secular and seasonal music.

Tickets —$5 to $10 — will be available at the door or in advance from the UT Center for Performing Arts Box Office by calling 419.530.2787 or visiting the School of Visual and Performing Arts website.

Parking will be free for both concerts.

UT Leadership Institute 2018-19 class announced

Last year, 21 faculty from across the University participated in the second year of the UT Leadership Institute.

The program was launched in fall 2016 by UT President Sharon L. Gaber and Provost Andrew Hsu to provide professional development to help prepare future academic leaders.

“We started this program to help our fantastic faculty members develop into future academic leaders,” Gaber said. “We believe the UT Leadership Institute accelerates success in higher education administration.”

“For faculty who are interested in exploring leadership opportunities in higher education administration, participation in the UT Leadership Institute is an excellent opportunity,” Hsu said. “Our third cohort of faculty represents faculty from eight colleges and University Libraries. I look forward to the many contributions they will make as emerging leaders of the University.”

Following a competitive application process, a third cohort of 22 faculty members was selected to participate in this year’s UT Leadership Institute. This year’s participants are:

• Dr. Ammon Allred, Philosophy, College of Arts and Letters;

• Dr. Jillian Bornak, Physics, College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics;

• Dr. Lucinda Bouillon, School of Exercise and Rehabilitation Services, College of Health and Human Services;

• Dr. Maria Coleman, Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering;

• Dr. Joan Duggan, Medicine, College of Medicine and Life Sciences;

• Dr. Kevin Egan, Economics, College of Arts and Letters;

• Dr. Michael Ellis, Medicine, College of Medicine and Life Sciences;

• Dr. Rodney Gabel, School of Intervention and Wellness, College of Health and Human Services;

• Dr. David Giovannucci, Neurosciences, College of Medicine and Life Sciences;

• Dr. Lynn Hamer, Foundations of Education, Judith Herb College of Education;

• Dr. Dana Hollie, Accounting, College of Business and Innovation;

• Dr. A. Champa Jayasuriya, Orthopedic Surgery, College of Medicine and Life Sciences;

• Dr. David Kennedy, Medicine, College of Medicine and Life Sciences;

• Dr. Lisa Kovach, Foundations of Education, Judith Herb College of Education;

• Sarah Long, School of Exercise and Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Health and Human Services;

• Julia Martin, University Libraries;

• Amy O’Donnell, Management, College of Business and Innovation;

• Dr. Jorge Ortiz, Surgery, College of Medicine and Life Sciences;

• Dr. Youssef Sari, Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences;

• Dr. Rebecca Schneider, Curriculum and Instruction, Judith Herb College of Education;

• Dr. Qin Shao, Mathematics, College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics; and

• Dr. Puneet Sindhwani, Urology, College of Medicine and Life Sciences.

The first meeting of this year’s UT Leadership Institute cohort was held Oct. 5 and will be followed by monthly meetings throughout the academic year.

Participants will discuss various aspects of leadership in higher education and engage in discussions with members of the UT leadership team and invited speakers, with presentations focusing on leadership styles, critical issues facing administrators, funding, and diversity and inclusion.

President Sharon L. Gaber, second row standing at right, posed for a photo with most of the members of the 2018-19 class of the UT Leadership Institute during last month.

Ohio poet laureate to read work, sign books Nov. 20

Dr. Dave Lucas is a poet on a mission.

“I don’t want to convince you that you should love poetry. I want to convince you that you already do,” he wrote in a column for the Ohio Arts Council.

Lucas

“If you know by heart the lyrics to your favorite song, you already love one kind of poetry. You love another whenever you laugh at a joke or groan over a bad pun. The jargon of your profession and the slang you speak with friends are poetry. So are the metaphors we use to describe this world we all are trying to understand.”

Lucas, who began his two-year term as Ohio poet laureate in January, will visit The University of Toledo Tuesday, Nov. 20, to talk about his love of words and read his work. The free, public event will take place at 7 p.m. in Libbey Hall.

He also will sign copies of his first collection of poetry, “Weather,” which was published in 2011 and won the 2012 Ohioana Book Award for Poetry. That work also caught the attention of Rita Dove, former U.S. poet laureate, who called Lucas one of 13 “young poets to watch.”

“I’m excited we’re able to bring Dave Lucas to campus,” Dr. Benjamin Stroud, UT associate professor of English, said. “He’s not just an excellent poet, but a great advocate for poetry and, more widely, all the literary arts. He provides a great model to students — and everyone — for how to hone your own craft while also supporting the larger community of poets and writers.”

Since being named the state’s poet laureate Jan. 1, Lucas has been trying to debunk the lofty notions of the measured word.

“Poetry happens — in metaphors or jokes or in poems themselves — at that place where sound and sense blur into each other,” he wrote on the Ohio Arts Council website. “We may not realize that we are under the spell of poetry, because poetry is made of ordinary language (if language can ever be ordinary). Some words we use to toast a wedding or to bless the dead; others we use to order a pizza.”

That everyday sense was at the forefront of his class called Poetry for People Who Hate Poetry at Case Western Reserve University, and with Brews + Prose, a reading series he co-founded and co-curated with the slogan “literature is better with beer.”

Lucas’ poetry is featured in anthologies “The Bedford Introduction to Literature” and “Best New Poets 2015,” and has appeared in several journals, including The American Poetry Review, Blackbird, The Paris Review, Poetry and Slate.

The Cleveland native received a bachelor of arts degree from John Carroll University, a master of fine arts degree in creative writing from the University of Virginia, and master of arts and doctoral degrees in English language and literature from the University of Michigan.

His visit is presented by the Department of English Language and Literature, and the College of Arts and Letters.

For more information, contact Stroud at benjamin.stroud@utoledo.edu or 419.530.2086.

UT Rocket Marching Band to perform Nov. 17 in Valentine Theatre

The University of Toledo Rocket Marching Band will take its show on the road to an indoor venue. The Sounds of the Stadium Concert will be held Saturday, Nov. 17, at 8 p.m. at the Valentine Theatre, 410 Adams St.

The band will perform music from the 2018 football season.

The UT Rocket Marching Band performed during the 2018 Edward C. and Helen G. Schmakel Homecoming Parade.

Highlights of the program will include the music of Panic! at the Disco, Elton John, show tunes from “The Greatest Showman,” and traditional UT favorites.

Tickets are $7 each. Discount tickets are available for groups of 10 and more.

Tickets are available through the UT Center for Performing Arts Box Office, 419.530.ARTS (2787), and on the School of Visual and Performing Arts website, as well as through the Valentine Theatre Box Office, 419.242.ARTS (2787), and the Valentine Theatre website.

For more information, visit the UT Rocket Marching Band page.

UT Opera Ensemble to present ‘Così Fan Tutte’ this weekend

The UT Opera Ensemble will present Mozart’s comic Italian opera, “Così Fan Tutte” (“Women Are Like That”) with a modern country-western twist. Set in a country bar, a friend of two young men bets them that their girlfriends would be unfaithful if left unattended. So, the men take the bet and put their ladies to the test.

The opera will be sung in the original Italian, with subtitles provided.

Be there before the performance for barbecue, beer and free line dancing lessons. Beer is cash bar, and the barbecue will be sold by Deet’s BBQ.

Performances will take place Friday through Sunday, Nov. 16-18, in the UT Center for Performing Arts Recital Hall. Friday and Saturday performances will be at 7 p.m., and Sunday’s show will be at 2 p.m.

Cast members are UT student Alana Scaglioni, soprano, as Fiordiligi; UT alumna Katherine Kuhlman and UT student Kate Walcher, mezzo-sopranos, as Dorabella; UT Music Instructor Justin Bays, baritone, as Guglielmo; UT student Moises Salazar and UT alumnus William Floss, tenors, as Ferrando; UT student Paige Chapman, soprano, as Despina; Jonathan Stuckey, bass baritone, as Don Alfonso; and UT students Kaitlyn Trumbul, Kailyn Wilson, Sterling Wisenewski and Jasmin Davis as the chorus.

Dr. Denise Ritter Bernardini, UT assistant professor of music, is producing and directing the show. Wayne Anthony is the music director, and Scaglioni is the assistant director. Kent Lautzenheiser-Nash is the choreographer.

Tickets $10 to $15 are available through the Center for Performing Arts Box Office by calling 419.530.ARTS (2787), online at the School for Visual and Performing Arts website, and at the door.

For more information, visit the UT Department of Music opera page.

UT alumnus/doctoral student to hold book-signing event Nov. 17

Jeremy Holloway, who is pursuing a doctorate in curriculum and instruction in the Judith Herb College of Education, has published a book titled “God Wants You to Smile Today: 25 Epiphanies of God’s Goodness — Secrets to Living With Radical Peace, Joy and Hope.”

He will sign his debut book Saturday, Nov. 17, from 3 to 5 p.m. at Intersection Church, 1640 S. Coy Road in Oregon, Ohio. Entertainment, giveaways and refreshments will be provided at the event, where the book will be for sale for $8.99.

Proceeds will go to Celebrate Recovery, which is a program for anyone struggling with hurt, pain or addiction of any kind.

Holloway wanted his first book to inspire others.

“‘God Wants You To Smile Today’ is an inspirational book about using your talents and lives to put a smile on the face of our Creator, and on the faces of others around you,” he said.

“This book is a constant reminder of how good life can be, and that the gift of a smile is a precious and powerful thing,” Holloway said. “This book reminds me to smile when I meet someone or smile when I wake up in the morning. ‘God Wants You to Smile Today’ reminds me I have been given talents and gifts that can make other people smile and I intend to use them.”

Holloway is using his talents to help many. He is a mentor for undergraduate students through the University’s Brothers on the Rise, which helps UT males, especially African-American and Latino, make the transition from high school and college. He also is involved with UT’s Multicultural Emerging Scholars Program, represents the Judith Herb College of Education in the Graduate Student Association, and is a leader for the Kappa Delta Pi Honor Society in Education. In addition, he is a mentor with Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Holloway

His work and dedication have been noticed. In 2017, he received the 20 Under 40 Leadership Award, which is presented annually by Leadership Toledo to 20 individuals who are 39 or younger in the Toledo community who have demonstrated exceptional leadership qualities.

The native of Toledo received a bachelor of arts degree in Spanish and a bachelor of education degree from UT in 2005. He taught Spanish at area schools and graduated from the University in 2014 with a master’s degree in English as a second language.

“The opportunities I’ve received at UT have surely made me smile, and I consider them to be a gift that I intend to share to make other people smile as well,” Holloway said.

In the future, he intends to write academic books to engage the mind, but he also plans to write inspirational books to engage the soul, heart and spirit.

“God Wants You to Smile Today” will be for sale at the Nov. 17 event and also is available at Amazon.com in paperback and Kindle form.

New leadership named for Eberly Center for Women

The University of Toledo appointed new leadership to the Catharine S. Eberly Center for Women, which promotes the personal and professional advancement of women at the University and in the surrounding community and offers scholarships to UT students.

Nielsen

Dr. Kim Nielsen, UT professor of disability studies, history, and women’s and gender studies, will serve as interim director through August 2019.

Danielle Stamper, program coordinator for the UT Office of Multicultural Student Success, was named interim program manager during that same period.

Nielsen and Stamper take over day-to-day administrative operations as UT launches a search for a new executive director to replace Dr. Shanda Gore, who continues to serve as the executive director of the Minority Business Development Center.

“We thank Dr. Shanda Gore for her leadership and service to the Eberly Center,” Dr. Phillip “Flapp” Cockrell, vice president for student affairs, said. “I welcome Dr. Kim Nielsen and Danielle Stamper to the center. They bring a wealth of proven leadership and experience reflective of the core mission and values of the Eberly Center.”

Stamper

The Eberly Center reports to both the Office of Diversity and Inclusion and the Division of Student Affairs.

“The new leaders are responsible for implementing high-impact programs, engaging internal and external stakeholders, promoting student success and student well-being, and strategically increasing the visibility of the Eberly Center,” Dr. Willie McKether, vice president for diversity and inclusion, said.

The Eberly Center hosts programming and services to empower women and guide them on their careers and community engagement to enable them to reach their highest potential. The Eberly Center offers personal and professional development classes and is home to Kate’s Closet, a professional women’s clothing closet providing complimentary professional attire to UT students and clients of the center.

“This responsibility and opportunity is an honor,” Nielsen said. “Since its founding in 1977, the Eberly Center has always been an important resource for both the UT community and the greater Toledo community. The Eberly Center seeks to bring hope and growth to women, provide resources for all who seek to support women, and welcome those committed to gender justice and equality. I invite all to stop by to say hello and use the space to study, have an organizational meeting, ask questions, use Kate’s Closet, learn about our scholarships, try the computer lab, or just relax.”

“Women’s centers have a rich history of not only empowering women, but also working toward gender equity and inclusion within the institution,” Stamper said. “I look forward to connecting my baccalaureate and professional experiences to continue growing as a student affairs practitioner.”

The Eberly Center is located in Tucker Hall Room 0168 and is open Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Nov. 15 reading to spotlight work by Ohio Arts Council award recipients

Two UT faculty members will celebrate winning the Ohio Art Council’s 2018 Individual Excellence Award with a reading Thursday, Nov. 15, at 4 p.m. in Carlson Library Room 1005.

To mark the honor, Dr. Benjamin Stroud, UT associate professor of English, and Dr. Jim Ferris, UT professor and the Ability Center Endowed Chair in Disability Studies, will read some of their work.

Stroud

Stroud, who specializes in creative writing and 20th-century American fiction, plans to read a piece titled “My Dear Master Liszt” he submitted for the Ohio Arts Council’s Individual Excellence Award.

“It’s focused, in part, on an event that happened just before the Civil War in a town in East Texas, a town a few miles from where I grew up,” Stroud said. “It’s a sort of fictional exploration of history, and an attempt at recovering something that’s been largely forgotten.”

Stroud is the author of the story collection titled “Byzantium,” which won the 2012 Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference Bakeless Fiction Prize and was selected as a Best Book of the Summer in 2013 by Publisher’s Weekly and the Chicago Tribune.

His stories have appeared in Harper’s Magazine, One Story, Electric Literature, Boston Review and more.

Ferris

Ferris, who is the Lucas County poet laureate, will read “Comprehensive List of All Benefits to Being Disabled in Contemporary America” and other recent poems. “Comprehensive List” is among his poems that will be published in March in the anthology “Undocumented: Great Lakes Poets Laureate on Social Justice.”

Ferris holds a doctorate in performance studies and believes poems are invitations to performance not only for poets and speakers, but for readers and listeners as well. “Poems come alive when they are taken into the body,” he said. “A reading is a great opportunity to complete the circuit.”

Other poems will come from a new project exploring family history, race, disability, and the construction of cultural identity. Titled “Is Your Mama White? Excavating Hidden History,” Ferris is planning a performance of the work at the University during spring semester.

His books include “Slouching Towards Guantanamo,” “Facts of Life: Poems” and “The Hospital Poems.” Ferris also is the author of “Laborare,” a poem he wrote for the inauguration of the new mayor of Toledo in January 2018.

The free, public reading is sponsored by the UT School of Interdisciplinary Studies and the Roger Ray Institute for the Humanities.

University Women’s Commission lunch and learn Nov. 15

“Finding a Healthy Work-Life Balance for a Meaningful Career in Higher Education” will be the topic of the University Women’s Commission for Lunch and Learn Thursday, Nov. 15.

The event will take place at noon in Snyder Memorial Building Room 1100.

The speaker will be Dr. Beth M. Schlemper, interim associate dean of the College of Graduate Studies and associate professor of geography and planning.

Campus community members are invited to bring their lunch attend the free event.