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College of Business and Innovation arranges for special price Cedar Point tickets Sept. 23-24

The University of Toledo community can visit one of this region’s unique fall attractions at a special price thanks to a partnership between the UT College of Business and Innovation and Cedar Point.

“The UT College of Business and Innovation Graduate Programs has wonderful relationships with many corporations, businesses and organizations in this region,” said Kelly Barger, director of the college graduate programs office, “and because of our many friends and contacts, we were able to negotiate a special ticket price for Cedar Point admission during one of their very popular Halloweekends, Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 23 and 24.”

This offer enables people to purchase a ticket for $35, plus tax, through the Cedar Point website, cedarpoint.com/affiliate, using the username UTCOBI and the password utcobi.

Explaining this is not a paid sponsorship or subsidized ticket program, Barger added, “Working with Cedar Point through this promotion enables us to tell even more people about the amazing educational opportunities for graduate studies at The University of Toledo College of Business and Innovation, while arranging for the UT community, and others who learn of this promotion through us, to enjoy the Halloweenish activities at one of northwest Ohio’s most recognized attractions.”

Study abroad trip broadens business horizons for students

As soon as spring semester ended and the last graduates walked off the stage with their cherished diplomas, dozens of College of Business and Innovation students embarked on an engaging study abroad program to London and Berlin.

All College of Business and Innovation students — all majors — are strongly encouraged to study abroad during their undergraduate degree program. Study abroad programs can assist students in the development of academic, intellectual, personal, professional and cross-cultural skills.

Business students smiled for the camera in front of Berlin’s Brandenburg Gate.

These two- to three-week study abroad programs are led by College of Business faculty members, with Carol Sullinger and Dean Gary Insch leading May’s trip. Examples of College of Business faculty trips include eastern Europe, western Europe and Asia. Opportunities vary from year to year.

“I teach both marketing and international business classes and have experience in industry international business,” Sullinger said. “The trip is designed to be an immersion into the business culture, which includes the economic, political and cultural environments of a country. Those are the foundations of the business environment, and the trip is an experiential way to learn. The idea is to experience both the differences and the similarities of the different countries.

“My role was co-teaching the class with the dean throughout the semester in preparation for the trip, as well as planning the company, educational and cultural visits, everything from picking the hotels and assigning roommates to coordinating travel plans and the itinerary throughout the trip,” she added. “I think one of the really special parts of the trip was for the students to spend 10 days with the dean of the College of Business and Innovation. It was a privilege for all of us to learn from his knowledge and experience.”  

Business students met with members of a real estate agency in London.

“I went on this trip because I thought it was a great opportunity to squeeze in an extra class while being able to travel abroad and immerse myself into new cultures,” said Alex Odenweller, who majors in finance and accounting. “The biggest thing I learned was that the cultural and language barriers in European countries were more apparent than I thought they were. These barriers sometimes made it difficult to travel around the cities and immerse into the cultures.”

“I would definitely recommend this class to everyone,” Natalie Zerucha said. “I believe everyone should experience a culture change to make us as Americans realize how fortunate we are, as well as to show them that companies overall operate the same as we do and that it would be interesting to work with a business overseas.

The students also visited St. Paul’s Cathedral in London.

“All businesses have the same sort of cycle no matter where you are in the world,” Zerucha added. “They might operate differently but they get their products from somewhere and someone else packages those products, so that is supply chain. Someone deals with their numbers. They market. I learned if you have an idea, run with it and see where it takes you, like Passle for example; they failed a few times, but they got back up and readjusted how they wanted to do things and be an asset to the business world. I also learned that you have to go with the trends to stay in the market, like QVC.”

Odenweller said, “The best experience for me was becoming very good friends with some of the people on the trip. I didn’t know anyone before going on the trip, and when I left I had made a whole new group of friends. Being able to experience everything London and Berlin had to offer with a group of friends made the trip an even greater experience. I would say that this trip was one of the best experiences I have ever had, and I would go on it again in a heartbeat.”

“My favorite part of the trip was watching each student grow,” Sullinger said. “We had a wide variety of travel experience in the group; one student had never been on a plane, and another was a graduate student who did international medical device sales for his career. The group bonded in so many ways. One of the students who had never run a 10K in his life decided to enter and compete in one in London. His roommate on the trip went with him to cheer him on. The whole group, after learning of his accomplishment, congratulated him for days. I have many more of those stories, and each one was really rewarding to see. Watching each student grow is what I love about teaching.”

The location of next year’s trip will be determined before the fall semester starts. Anyone interested can contact Sullinger at carol.sullinger@utoledo.edu.

“The dean and I are looking forward to another great trip with up to 20 students in May 2018,” she said.

Colleges of Business, Engineering alumni affiliates hosting annual golf outing

The University of Toledo’s College of Business and Innovation and the Engineering alumni affiliates will host their 19th annual golf outing Saturday, Aug. 5, to support student scholarships and affiliate programming.

The event will be held at Bedford Hills Golf Club, 6400 Jackman Road in Temperance, Mich., with check-in beginning at 8 a.m. and the 18-hole shotgun starting at 9 a.m.

More than 100 area golfers are expected to participate in this philanthropic event.

“Last year, thanks to our many wonderful sponsors and participants, we successfully raised more than $10,000 for student scholarships,” Marcus Sneed, associate director of alumni relations, said. “We are again asking the community to support this outing through sponsorship and participation. With your help, this year’s outing will be an even greater success.”

The cost is $90 per golfer ($360 per foursome) and includes:

• Continental breakfast and catered lunch;

• Two beverage tickets;

• Free use of the driving range;

• 18 holes of golf with a cart;

• Swag bag of gifts for each golfer;

• Prizes for the first-, second- and third-place teams;

• Two betting holes, closet to the pin, and longest putt contests; and

• Mulligans and team skins available.

The College of Business and Innovation and the College of Engineering alumni affiliates were established to help connect graduates to their UT family. Through these groups, alumni have the opportunity to network, socialize and volunteer at all levels throughout the Alumni Association.

If you wish to participate or become a sponsor, visit toledoalumni.org.

Several business programs receive high continental and global rankings from Eduniversal

Eduniversal, a global ranking and rating agency specializing in higher education, has again repeatedly included The University of Toledo College of Business and Innovation in its latest listing of Best Business School programs.

The just-published results of the Eduniversal ranking for the 4,000 best masters and MBAs in 32 fields of study worldwide ranks the UT College of Business and Innovation in these programs:

• Master of Business Administration, ranked No. 35 in General Management, North America;

• Human Resources Management, ranked No. 30 in Human Resources, North America;

• Marketing and Professional Sales, ranked No. 37 in Marketing in North America;

• Master in Supply Chain Management, ranked No. 93 in Supply Chain and Logistics, worldwide; and

• Executive MBA, ranked No. 47 in Executive MBA and MBA part time, North America.

In announcing the rankings, Eduniversal stated: “This recognition acknowledges the quality and success your institution has achieved over the past year, to which we measure across three main criteria: The reputation of the programs: highly recognized by recruiting companies and have an active approach toward them; the salary of first employment after graduation: placement of your graduates in the best job positions on the market; and student satisfaction: working to improve your programs by taking into account feedback from your students.”

“We are very excited by these prestigious rankings, which validate the high quality of our faculty and students, as well as the significance of our curriculum,” Dr. Gary Insch, dean of the College of Business and Innovation, said. “The fact that our Supply Chain Program ranked No. 93 in the entire world is a truly remarkable achievement.

“These significant recognitions are among the reasons that many well-known companies come to the UT College of Business and Innovation to find the talent they need,” Insch added. “It reflects very positively on our outstanding quality, and demonstrates the extremely dynamic and mutually beneficial relationship enjoyed by our college and the business community.”

The Eduniversal Evaluation System compiles and analyzes hundreds of data about business schools from global, national and regional higher education systems, taking into account the accreditations, the results of other rankings, and the distinctions obtained in the country of the schools analyzed.

Eduniversal (best-masters.com) has been working since 1994 to provide schools and students with the best information possible in the higher education sector. The Eduniversal ranking is published once a year and was announced at its recent annual world convention.

Engineering classmates win first-place prize in 2017 business plan competition

The SpecuLIFT Team claimed the $10,000 prize last month in the seventh annual UT College of Business and Innovation’s Business Innovation Competition.

The award will help the team develop its idea into a successful business.

Winning the College of Business and Innovation’s Business Innovation Competition and $10,000 were members of the SpecuLIFT Team, from left, Michael Peachock, Rachel Wagner, Andrew Oehrtman, Mark Caris, Melissa Brodsky, and Dr. Ronald Fournier, professor of bioengineering and team adviser. The team posed for a photo with Dr. Sonny Ariss, professor and chair of the Department of Management.

The winning team — Michael Peachock, Rachel Wagner, Andrew Oehrtman, Mark Caris and Melissa Brodsky — all met in the College of Engineering, are all bioengineering majors, and have remained close friends through their shared five-year educational journey. Their competition idea submission, developed for their engineering senior design project, was for a Novel Vaginal Speculum, a medical diagnostic device for which they are pursuing a patent.

“We started with about 50 different ideas for our senior design engineering project,” Wagner said. “Melissa and I worked on research. My sister works in the health-care field, and current specula are uncomfortable. Our team member, Michael, is a business minor and gave us a lot of insight into developing our business plan.”

“Since our major is bioengineering, we saw that it has good market potential,” Caris said, “so it was one of our top three ideas. The device is used by gynecologists for a pelvic exam, and a likely scenario for our device would be in an emergency room setting. Our goal was to maximize patient comfort with functionality.”

Caris added, “We all met in engineering and have known each other for five years. They are all great people, and we are great friends.”

Brodsky said, “The $10,000 prize will enable us to do more prototyping, such as a version that has a light source. Entering the business plan competition was a very eye-opening experience.”

“We are willing to support you, to provide free advice about how to spend, where to spend and when not to spend,” advised Dr. Sonny Ariss, professor and chair of the Department of Management in the College of Business and Innovation. “Statistically, you have a 5 percent chance of success, and I’m telling you this so you will be diligent not to fail. Your prize money is a major leap. Don’t underestimate yourself. Surround yourself with a great advisory board.”

“We are pursuing a patent for the device and, ultimately, will need to obtain FDA approval,” Caris said. “I am super-excited about this and fully expect to work lots of hours. We are ready to proceed.”

Finishing in second place was Green Agrothermal LLC, submitted by Mohammadmatin Hanifzadeh and Dr. Dong Shik Kim, associate professor of chemical and environmental engineering, who received the $5,000 prize to develop their business.

Honorable mention went to RowBot, submitted by Jeffrey Darah and Andrew Puppos.

The College of Business and Innovation’s business plan competition received 31 entries this year and was open to all UT faculty, staff and students.

College of Business helps sponsor new WGTE show

The University of Toledo College of Business and Innovation is one of the major sponsors of “Business 360,” which will premiere Thursday, May 18, at 8:30 p.m. on WGTE.

This new 30-minute, magazine-style program will take a look at regional trends, technology and leadership in northwest Ohio and southeast Michigan.

Host Kristi Hoffman is an award-winning television host and producer, author, and CEO of Total Package Global, a professional and personal development corporation.

Dr. Gary Insch, dean of the UT College of Business and Innovation, is featured in the first segment of the debut. He discusses leadership.

An encore presentation of the premiere episode will air Sunday, June 4, at 11 a.m.

Future episodes will air the third Thursday of the month at 8:30 p.m. followed by the first Sunday at 11 a.m.

Kristi Hoffman, left, is the host of “Business 360.”

Distinguished University Lecturers named

Three Distinguished University Lecturers were recognized April 20 during a ceremony in Doermann Theater.

“Appointment to the rank of Distinguished University Lecturer is the highest permanent honor The University of Toledo can bestow on a lecturer,” Dr. Andrew Hsu, provost and executive vice president for academic affairs, said.

“Those named Distinguished University Lecturer have earned recognition and distinction as educators, advancing student learning, facilitating and supporting student success, and demonstrating a commitment to the University’s educational mission.”

The duration of the appointment as a Distinguished University Lecturer is unlimited, and the title may be retained after a lecturer has retired from the University.

The three Distinguished University Lecturers, holding their certificates from left, Dr. Susanne Nonekowski, Dr. Joseph Hara and Teresa Keefe, posed for a photo during the April 20 ceremony in Doermann Theater with, from left, Dr. Andrew Hsu, provost and executive vice president for academic affairs; President Sharon L. Gaber; and Dr. Jamie Barlowe, interim vice provost for faculty affairs and dean of the College of Arts and Letters.

Faculty eligible for the designation are assistant, associate and senior lecturers.

Named Distinguished University Lecturers were:

• Dr. Joseph Hara, senior lecturer in the Department of Foreign Languages in the College of Arts and Letters. He has taught at UT since 1987, first as a Japanese instructor and then as a lecturer. He is the director of the Japanese Program.

“Dr. Hara developed a minor degree program in Japanese, now the second highest enrolled Japanese program in the state, following Ohio State University,” one nominator wrote. “Dr. Hara is well-known for never saying no to a student who needs his support and for his promotion of study abroad, taking students to Japan each summer for cultural and language immersion, as well as developing exchange programs with Japanese universities, including Aichi University. Some UT graduates were able to successfully find jobs in Japan after their degree completion because of the programs that Dr. Hara established and continues to lead. His exemplary teaching evaluations also attest to the impact he has on the lives and the success of students. He received the University Outstanding Teaching Award in 2002.”

• Teresa Keefe, senior lecturer in the Department of Information Operations and Technology Management in the College of Business and Innovation. She has been teaching at UT 13 years. Keefe is the faculty adviser to the Association for Information Technology Professionals.

“She continuously develops new and innovative courses, incorporating new technologies, and providing active learning experiences for her students, including flipped classes and service learning, all contributing to student retention and graduation rates,” one nominator wrote. “Over my 37 years at the University, I have never seen the likes of Teresa in terms of teaching, service and dedication to the betterment of students.” A former student wrote, “If I was asked who outside my immediate family had the largest impact on my education and professional growth, without hesitation, ‘Teresa Keefe’ would be blurted out.” And another graduate noted, “I owe my success to Teresa Keefe. She is an exceedingly wonderful professor, mentor and friend. The amount of dedication that she pours into her passion daily is inspiring.”

• Dr. Susanne Nonekowski, associate lecturer in the Department of Medicinal and Biological Chemistry in the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. She began teaching at the University in 2001.

“Dr. Nonekowski is often the earliest adopter of active learning methods such as clickers and Blackboard chat rooms; she won an Assessment Award in the college in 2014 and mentors other faculty who are incorporating assessment in their courses,” one nominator wrote. “She received an Innovations in Teaching Award in 2015, and she was nominated for a University Outstanding Teaching Award in 2010.” A graduate wrote, “I believe that Dr. N. is truly in a league all her own when it comes to her teaching style, her abundant ability, and her academic perspective. She is not only compassionate and knowledgeable, but also a lecturer who makes learning interesting and fun.” A student wrote, “It is clear that the instructor really knows her stuff, and her passion and understanding for the material had a great impact on my learning.”

Couple gives $1 million for endowed professorship in accounting

Alan H. Barry and his wife, Karen A. Barry, have given their alma mater a $1 million gift to establish an endowment that supports the Alan H. and Karen A. Barry Endowed Professorship in Accounting at The University of Toledo.

The Barrys announced the gift at their home in Scottsdale, Ariz., April 21 at an alumni event for the Phoenix Chapter of the UT Alumni Association. University President Sharon L. Gaber attended the event in Scottsdale as the alumni chapter’s invited speaker.

Karen A. Barry, left, and her husband, Alan H. Barry, signed an agreement April 21 with UT President Sharon L. Gaber to establish an endowed professorship in accounting at the University.

“UT’s College of Business and Innovation has benefited greatly from the generosity of Alan and Karen Barry through their many gifts, which have supported both the Management and Accounting departments,” Gaber said. “Their donations have helped our business faculty prepare UT students to enter the accounting and management professions with all of the necessary critical-thinking skills and core business principles to succeed as leaders in today’s competitive marketplace.

“This newest gift from Alan and Karen Barry to endow a professorship adds another level of support, ensuring that our students are receiving the best possible education in accounting, and that our faculty have the resources they need to deliver an education of excellence,” she said. “The University is deeply grateful for Alan and Karen Barry’s generous gift and all that they do to support UT students.”

The Alan H. and Karen A. Barry Endowed Professorship in Accounting will be used to recruit or retain a professor in the Department of Accounting; any costs related to the recruitment of a faculty member; bridge or pilot research projects; faculty and staff development costs; curriculum development; the development of a fellowship program; and specialized equipment needed for teaching.

“We are ecstatic that Alan and Karen have made such a tremendously generous gift to establish the endowed professorship in accounting in the College of Business,” said Dr. Gary Insch, dean of the College of Business and Innovation. “Their action will benefit countless students for years to come and further elevate the College of Business and Innovation’s reputation. Alan shows how much he truly cares about our students by frequently coming to campus when he is in town, and taking the time to meet and talk with business students, answering their real-life questions, and being a true mentor to them. We cannot thank Alan and Karen enough for their kindness, generosity and support.”

Alan Barry, who is a certified public accountant and the retired president and chief operating officer of the Fortune 200 company Masco Corp., said giving back to UT students is a pleasure: “The accounting background I got at the University was beneficial to me throughout my career. I’ve always been a supporter of the University, and once I was in a position to do so financially, I felt pretty good about giving back to the University that gave me the opportunity to succeed.”

He joined Brass Craft Manufacturing Co. in 1972 as controller and became president of that Masco division in 1988. In 1996, he became a group president of Masco, a manufacturer of home improvement and building products. He has broad business experience that includes finance, manufacturing, customer development, acquisitions and general operating management.

He serves on the board of directors of the H.W. Kaufman Financial Group. He is a retired director of Arch Aluminum & Glass Co. Inc., Scotts Miracle Gro Co., Flint Inc., and IPS Corp. He also served as an executive board member of the Plumbing Manufacturing Institute from 1985 through 2000, and as chairman of the institute in 1994. In addition, Barry served on the executive board of the associate member division of the American Supply Association during 1995 and 1996.

The Barrys have a history of philanthropy at The University of Toledo. In 2014, the University named a new accounting lab in the College of Business and Innovation for Alan Barry. At the time the lab was established, it was the first one nationwide to have a certified management accountant license, in which students could access for free the review material from Wiley, a leading provider of educational programs for professionals and students who are preparing for the certified management accountant exam.

The lab also serves as the location of the free income tax preparation assistance the College of Business and Innovation provides annually to qualified, low- to moderate-income individuals and families in the Toledo area during the spring income tax filing season.

“I am truly grateful for Karen and Alan Barry for their continuous support to the accounting students,” Dr. Hassan HassabElnaby, professor and chair of the UT Department of Accounting, said. “It’s only through people like Karen and Alan that we are able to provide the high-quality education we offer at the UT College of Business and Innovation. It has been my privilege to see Alan as a guest speaker in the classrooms, meeting and advising accounting students, supporting their development through the state-of-the-art Alan Barry Accounting Lab and the $1 million gift.”

The Barrys also endowed the Alan and Karen Barry Scholarship Fund, which provides support for full-time UT business accounting students, based on both merit and needs. Alan Barry, a native of Toledo, is an active UT Alumni Association Phoenix Chapter member, as well as an active member in UT’s Blue Key organization. He also serves on the UT Foundation Board of Trustees.

The couple’s interest in supporting accounting students through financing scholarships, the accounting lab and the endowed professorship grew out of a nostalgic return to campus. “I was invited back to the University about 15 or so years ago. I hadn’t been on the campus for a long time, and I guess I kind of fell in love with the place for the second time.” The Barrys have been supportive donors ever since.

Alan received a business degree in 1966, and Karen graduated in 1964 with an associate degree.

The Department of Accounting is accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business, International. This prestigious accreditation places the department among the top 2 percent of accounting departments worldwide.

2017 Pacemaker Awards to honor local entrepreneur, outstanding UT business students

The University of Toledo College of Business and Innovation and the Business Engagement and Leadership Council will recognize both business and academic excellence during their 54th annual Pacemaker Awards Friday, April 7, at the Inverness Club.

Receiving the 2017 Business Pacemaker Award is Brent L. Cousino, acting chief operating officer and chief financial officer for VentureMed Group. VentureMed is a medical device startup company based at ProMedica Innovations in Toledo. Its first product was approved by the FDA last year, and sales have begun in Europe and the United States.

Cousino

He is also CEO of Browning Cousineau Corp., a private advisory firm founded in 2012 focused in the health-care industry. He serves on the advisory board of Principle Business Enterprises in Bowling Green. From 2012 to 2015, he served as CEO of IRISense LLC, a biomedical device startup at UT Innovation Enterprises. During that time, he also served as assistant for business outreach and engagement for then UT College of Business and Innovation Dean Thomas Gutteridge, as well as an entrepreneur-in-residence for UT Innovation Enterprises.

Cousino co-founded the CPA firm of Nachtrab, Cousino, O’Neil, Treuhaft & Co. in 1984 with a primary focus on the health-care industry and led a merger with Plante Moran in 1997. He went on to build a national feasibility consulting practice and retired from Plante Moran in 2012.

Active in community service, Cousino is a member of the Mercy Health – Toledo Market board of directors, a seven hospital region of Mercy Health, and serves on its strategy development committee. He is involved in Toledo Rotary and the Young Presidents’ Organization. He also has served in numerous board leadership capacities over the years; these include the UT Alumni Association, Imagination Station, Lott Industries, Sunshine Communities, St. Michael’s in the Hills, and the Young Presidents’ Organization Maumee Valley Chapter.

A 1978 UT alumnus who graduated with a bachelor of business administration degree in accounting, Cousino received a Student Pacemaker Award in 1977 and in 1997 received the Outstanding Accountant Award from UT’s Beta Alpha Psi Chapter. In 2000, he was named to the Sylvania Schools Distinguished Alumni Hall of Fame. He lives in Toledo with his wife, Pam, and they have two sons who live in Washington, D.C.

“Recipients of the Pacemaker Award over the past five decades read as a Who’s Who of current and legendary business leaders in the Toledo region,” said Dr. Gary Insch, dean of the UT College of Business and Innovation, “and Brent Cousino certainly belongs in that impressive roster. The Pacemaker Award is the College of Business and Innovation’s highest honor, recognizing individuals for outstanding achievement in business, as well as contributions to the community and the University.”

Student Pacemaker Awards are presented to UT College of Business and Innovation graduate and undergraduate students for their outstanding academic achievement, University and community service, and leadership.

The 2017 student Pacemakers are: Master of Business Administration — Alejandro Vera; Executive Master of Business Administration — Abul Faiz Ahmed; Master of Science in Accountancy — Malachi Benesh; Accounting — Dana Breese, Jessica Knepper; Finance — Jordan Spellis, Elizabeth Bates; Information Operations Technology Management — Abdulmonem Alfadhel, Brad Spelman; Management — Jesseca Perkins, Hala Abou-Dahech; Marketing/International Business — Grant Horlamus, Gabriella LeMaster; Applied Organizational Technology — Teresa Rodriguez, administrative assistant in UT Undergraduate Admission; and Dean’s Recipient — Patrick Ryan.

UT professor selected as one of three finalists for $250,000 national teaching award

A leadership scholar at The University of Toledo is a finalist for a prestigious national teaching award.

Dr. Clinton Longenecker, Distinguished University Professor and director of the Center for Leadership and Organizational Excellence in the UT College of Business and Innovation, is one of three finalists selected for Baylor University’s 2018 Robert Foster Cherry Award for Great Teaching.

Longenecker

The other finalists are Dr. Heidi Elmendorf, associate professor of biology at Georgetown University, and Dr. Neil Garg, professor of chemistry at UCLA.

The Cherry Award is the only national teaching award — with the single largest monetary reward of $250,000 — presented by a college or university to an individual for exceptional teaching.

“To be selected as one of three finalists for this prestigious award is an absolute honor, and I’m very proud to represent The University of Toledo on this national stage,” Longenecker said. “I’ve considered my entire career to be a privilege, an opportunity to make a difference, and a blessing to be able to teach adult learners how to improve their skills and career trajectory.”

As Cherry Award finalists, each professor will receive $15,000, as well as $10,000 for their home departments to foster the development of teaching skills. Each finalist will present a series of lectures at Baylor during fall 2017 and also a Cherry Award lecture on their home campuses during the upcoming academic year.

The Cherry Award winner, which will be announced by Baylor in 2018, will receive $250,000 and an additional $25,000 for his or her home department and will teach in residence at Baylor during fall 2018 or spring 2019.

“With close to 100 nominees from a very strong field, the Cherry Committee had the difficult task of naming three finalists for the 2018 Cherry Award,” said Dr. Michael W. Thompson, committee chair and associate dean for undergraduate programs in Baylor’s School of Engineering and Computer Science. “It is gratifying and inspirational to learn about each nominee’s accomplishments and dedication to great teaching. The three finalists for the 2018 award are excellent scholars and great teachers, and we look forward to hosting their campus visits during the fall 2017 semester.”

The Cherry Award program is designed to honor great teachers, to stimulate discussion in the academy about the value of teaching, and to encourage departments and institutions to value their own great teachers. Individuals nominated for the award have proven records as extraordinary teachers with positive, inspiring and long-lasting effects on students, along with records of distinguished scholarship.

“Dr. Longenecker is a UT alumnus who makes a difference every day for his students as an effective and passionate classroom leader,” UT President Sharon L. Gaber said. “This is a well-deserved honor, and we wish him luck through the Cherry Award experience.”

“I’m greatly humbled by this recognition as I work in a student-centered institution with lots of great teachers,” Longenecker said. “For me, teaching isn’t about just presenting information to my students. Rather, it is all about helping students improve their motivation, their integration and mastery of important ideas, concepts and practices, as well as their application to be able to do the things necessary to be successful with their careers and personal lives. In the final analysis, teaching is all about transforming students, and as a comprehensive University that is what we do and do well across all disciplines.”

Longenecker has received more than 60 teaching, service and research awards and numerous industry awards. In 2013, he was recognized by The Economist as one of the “Top 15 Business Professors in the World.”

His teaching, research and consulting interests are in high-performance leadership and creating great organizations. Longenecker has published more than 190 articles and papers in academic and professional journals, as well as several best-selling books. His latest book, “The Successful Career Survival Guide,” was published in March.