UT News » Business and Innovation

UT News

Categories

Search News

Archives

Resources

Business and Innovation

Couple gives $1 million for endowed professorship in accounting

Alan H. Barry and his wife, Karen A. Barry, have given their alma mater a $1 million gift to establish an endowment that supports the Alan H. and Karen A. Barry Endowed Professorship in Accounting at The University of Toledo.

The Barrys announced the gift at their home in Scottsdale, Ariz., April 21 at an alumni event for the Phoenix Chapter of the UT Alumni Association. University President Sharon L. Gaber attended the event in Scottsdale as the alumni chapter’s invited speaker.

Karen A. Barry, left, and her husband, Alan H. Barry, signed an agreement April 21 with UT President Sharon L. Gaber to establish an endowed professorship in accounting at the University.

“UT’s College of Business and Innovation has benefited greatly from the generosity of Alan and Karen Barry through their many gifts, which have supported both the Management and Accounting departments,” Gaber said. “Their donations have helped our business faculty prepare UT students to enter the accounting and management professions with all of the necessary critical-thinking skills and core business principles to succeed as leaders in today’s competitive marketplace.

“This newest gift from Alan and Karen Barry to endow a professorship adds another level of support, ensuring that our students are receiving the best possible education in accounting, and that our faculty have the resources they need to deliver an education of excellence,” she said. “The University is deeply grateful for Alan and Karen Barry’s generous gift and all that they do to support UT students.”

The Alan H. and Karen A. Barry Endowed Professorship in Accounting will be used to recruit or retain a professor in the Department of Accounting; any costs related to the recruitment of a faculty member; bridge or pilot research projects; faculty and staff development costs; curriculum development; the development of a fellowship program; and specialized equipment needed for teaching.

“We are ecstatic that Alan and Karen have made such a tremendously generous gift to establish the endowed professorship in accounting in the College of Business,” said Dr. Gary Insch, dean of the College of Business and Innovation. “Their action will benefit countless students for years to come and further elevate the College of Business and Innovation’s reputation. Alan shows how much he truly cares about our students by frequently coming to campus when he is in town, and taking the time to meet and talk with business students, answering their real-life questions, and being a true mentor to them. We cannot thank Alan and Karen enough for their kindness, generosity and support.”

Alan Barry, who is a certified public accountant and the retired president and chief operating officer of the Fortune 200 company Masco Corp., said giving back to UT students is a pleasure: “The accounting background I got at the University was beneficial to me throughout my career. I’ve always been a supporter of the University, and once I was in a position to do so financially, I felt pretty good about giving back to the University that gave me the opportunity to succeed.”

He joined Brass Craft Manufacturing Co. in 1972 as controller and became president of that Masco division in 1988. In 1996, he became a group president of Masco, a manufacturer of home improvement and building products. He has broad business experience that includes finance, manufacturing, customer development, acquisitions and general operating management.

He serves on the board of directors of the H.W. Kaufman Financial Group. He is a retired director of Arch Aluminum & Glass Co. Inc., Scotts Miracle Gro Co., Flint Inc., and IPS Corp. He also served as an executive board member of the Plumbing Manufacturing Institute from 1985 through 2000, and as chairman of the institute in 1994. In addition, Barry served on the executive board of the associate member division of the American Supply Association during 1995 and 1996.

The Barrys have a history of philanthropy at The University of Toledo. In 2014, the University named a new accounting lab in the College of Business and Innovation for Alan Barry. At the time the lab was established, it was the first one nationwide to have a certified management accountant license, in which students could access for free the review material from Wiley, a leading provider of educational programs for professionals and students who are preparing for the certified management accountant exam.

The lab also serves as the location of the free income tax preparation assistance the College of Business and Innovation provides annually to qualified, low- to moderate-income individuals and families in the Toledo area during the spring income tax filing season.

“I am truly grateful for Karen and Alan Barry for their continuous support to the accounting students,” Dr. Hassan HassabElnaby, professor and chair of UT Department of Accounting. “It’s only through people like Karen and Alan that we are able to provide the high-quality education we offer at the UT College of Business and Innovation. It has been my privilege to see Alan as a guest speaker in the classrooms, meeting and advising accounting students, supporting their development through the state-of-the art Alan Barry Accounting Lab and the $1 million gift.”

The Barrys also endowed the Alan and Karen Barry Scholarship Fund, which provides support for full-time UT business accounting students, based on both merit and needs. Alan Barry, a native of Toledo, is an active UT Alumni Association Phoenix Chapter member, as well as an active member in UT’s Blue Key organization. He also serves on the UT Foundation Board of Trustees.

The couple’s interest in supporting accounting students through financing scholarships, the accounting lab and the endowed professorship grew out of a nostalgic return to campus. “I was invited back to the University about 15 or so years ago. I hadn’t been on the campus for a long time, and I guess I kind of fell in love with the place for the second time.” The Barrys have been supportive donors ever since.

Alan received a business degree in 1966, and Karen graduated in 1964 with an associate degree.

The Department of Accounting is accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business, International. This prestigious accreditation places the department among the top 2 percent of accounting departments worldwide.

2017 Pacemaker Awards to honor local entrepreneur, outstanding UT business students

The University of Toledo College of Business and Innovation and the Business Engagement and Leadership Council will recognize both business and academic excellence during their 54th annual Pacemaker Awards Friday, April 7, at the Inverness Club.

Receiving the 2017 Business Pacemaker Award is Brent L. Cousino, acting chief operating officer and chief financial officer for VentureMed Group. VentureMed is a medical device startup company based at ProMedica Innovations in Toledo. Its first product was approved by the FDA last year, and sales have begun in Europe and the United States.

Cousino

He is also CEO of Browning Cousineau Corp., a private advisory firm founded in 2012 focused in the health-care industry. He serves on the advisory board of Principle Business Enterprises in Bowling Green. From 2012 to 2015, he served as CEO of IRISense LLC, a biomedical device startup at UT Innovation Enterprises. During that time, he also served as assistant for business outreach and engagement for then UT College of Business and Innovation Dean Thomas Gutteridge, as well as an entrepreneur-in-residence for UT Innovation Enterprises.

Cousino co-founded the CPA firm of Nachtrab, Cousino, O’Neil, Treuhaft & Co. in 1984 with a primary focus on the health-care industry and led a merger with Plante Moran in 1997. He went on to build a national feasibility consulting practice and retired from Plante Moran in 2012.

Active in community service, Cousino is a member of the Mercy Health – Toledo Market board of directors, a seven hospital region of Mercy Health, and serves on its strategy development committee. He is involved in Toledo Rotary and the Young Presidents’ Organization. He also has served in numerous board leadership capacities over the years; these include the UT Alumni Association, Imagination Station, Lott Industries, Sunshine Communities, St. Michael’s in the Hills, and the Young Presidents’ Organization Maumee Valley Chapter.

A 1978 UT alumnus who graduated with a bachelor of business administration degree in accounting, Cousino received a Student Pacemaker Award in 1977 and in 1997 received the Outstanding Accountant Award from UT’s Beta Alpha Psi Chapter. In 2000, he was named to the Sylvania Schools Distinguished Alumni Hall of Fame. He lives in Toledo with his wife, Pam, and they have two sons who live in Washington, D.C.

“Recipients of the Pacemaker Award over the past five decades read as a Who’s Who of current and legendary business leaders in the Toledo region,” said Dr. Gary Insch, dean of the UT College of Business and Innovation, “and Brent Cousino certainly belongs in that impressive roster. The Pacemaker Award is the College of Business and Innovation’s highest honor, recognizing individuals for outstanding achievement in business, as well as contributions to the community and the University.”

Student Pacemaker Awards are presented to UT College of Business and Innovation graduate and undergraduate students for their outstanding academic achievement, University and community service, and leadership.

The 2017 student Pacemakers are: Master of Business Administration — Alejandro Vera; Executive Master of Business Administration — Abul Faiz Ahmed; Master of Science in Accountancy — Malachi Benesh; Accounting — Dana Breese, Jessica Knepper; Finance — Jordan Spellis, Elizabeth Bates; Information Operations Technology Management — Abdulmonem Alfadhel, Brad Spelman; Management — Jesseca Perkins, Hala Abou-Dahech; Marketing/International Business — Grant Horlamus, Gabriella LeMaster; Applied Organizational Technology — Teresa Rodriguez, administrative assistant in UT Undergraduate Admission; and Dean’s Recipient — Patrick Ryan.

UT professor selected as one of three finalists for $250,000 national teaching award

A leadership scholar at The University of Toledo is a finalist for a prestigious national teaching award.

Dr. Clinton Longenecker, Distinguished University Professor and director of the Center for Leadership and Organizational Excellence in the UT College of Business and Innovation, is one of three finalists selected for Baylor University’s 2018 Robert Foster Cherry Award for Great Teaching.

Longenecker

The other finalists are Dr. Heidi Elmendorf, associate professor of biology at Georgetown University, and Dr. Neil Garg, professor of chemistry at UCLA.

The Cherry Award is the only national teaching award — with the single largest monetary reward of $250,000 — presented by a college or university to an individual for exceptional teaching.

“To be selected as one of three finalists for this prestigious award is an absolute honor, and I’m very proud to represent The University of Toledo on this national stage,” Longenecker said. “I’ve considered my entire career to be a privilege, an opportunity to make a difference, and a blessing to be able to teach adult learners how to improve their skills and career trajectory.”

As Cherry Award finalists, each professor will receive $15,000, as well as $10,000 for their home departments to foster the development of teaching skills. Each finalist will present a series of lectures at Baylor during fall 2017 and also a Cherry Award lecture on their home campuses during the upcoming academic year.

The Cherry Award winner, which will be announced by Baylor in 2018, will receive $250,000 and an additional $25,000 for his or her home department and will teach in residence at Baylor during fall 2018 or spring 2019.

“With close to 100 nominees from a very strong field, the Cherry Committee had the difficult task of naming three finalists for the 2018 Cherry Award,” said Dr. Michael W. Thompson, committee chair and associate dean for undergraduate programs in Baylor’s School of Engineering and Computer Science. “It is gratifying and inspirational to learn about each nominee’s accomplishments and dedication to great teaching. The three finalists for the 2018 award are excellent scholars and great teachers, and we look forward to hosting their campus visits during the fall 2017 semester.”

The Cherry Award program is designed to honor great teachers, to stimulate discussion in the academy about the value of teaching, and to encourage departments and institutions to value their own great teachers. Individuals nominated for the award have proven records as extraordinary teachers with positive, inspiring and long-lasting effects on students, along with records of distinguished scholarship.

“Dr. Longenecker is a UT alumnus who makes a difference every day for his students as an effective and passionate classroom leader,” UT President Sharon L. Gaber said. “This is a well-deserved honor, and we wish him luck through the Cherry Award experience.”

“I’m greatly humbled by this recognition as I work in a student-centered institution with lots of great teachers,” Longenecker said. “For me, teaching isn’t about just presenting information to my students. Rather, it is all about helping students improve their motivation, their integration and mastery of important ideas, concepts and practices, as well as their application to be able to do the things necessary to be successful with their careers and personal lives. In the final analysis, teaching is all about transforming students, and as a comprehensive University that is what we do and do well across all disciplines.”

Longenecker has received more than 60 teaching, service and research awards and numerous industry awards. In 2013, he was recognized by The Economist as one of the “Top 15 Business Professors in the World.”

His teaching, research and consulting interests are in high-performance leadership and creating great organizations. Longenecker has published more than 190 articles and papers in academic and professional journals, as well as several best-selling books. His latest book, “The Successful Career Survival Guide,” was published in March.

KeyBank Global Leaders Forum at UT focuses on ‘Real Leadership’

“Real Leadership 2017” is the theme of the KeyBank Global Leaders Forum, which will be presented by The University of Toledo College of Business and Innovation Thursday, March 23, from 8 a.m. to noon in Savage Arena.

The program provides an environment for regional business leaders to talk about contemporary issues, discuss cutting-edge leadership practices, and explore trends.

The keynote speaker will be Gary Pinkel, former head football coach at UT and the University of Missouri. Pinkel is special consultant to the University of Missouri and its Athletic Department.

The event is free, but registration is required. To sign up, go to utoledo.edu/business/keybankforum.

More than 600 people attended the forum last year.

Also presenting at this year’s event will be Charles Packard, president of Pacific International Capital; Cynthia Thompson, chair of the Toledo Museum of Art Board of Directors and former co-owner of Midwest Stamping; Michael Anderson, chairman of the Andersons; and Dr. Clint Longenecker, UT Distinguished University Professor and director of the Center for Leadership and Organizational Excellence in the UT College of Business and Innovation.

“The KeyBank Global Leaders Forum provides a wonderful opportunity for area business professionals and leaders to hear from difference-making leaders such as Gary Pinkel, Cynthia Thompson, Michael Anderson and Charles Packard,” Jim Hoffman, president of KeyBank, said. “It is part of our vision at KeyBank to help our community and our businesses thrive.”

“The University of Toledo College of Business and Innovation is extremely pleased to again partner with KeyBank to present another Global Leaders Forum,” said Dr. Gary Insch, dean of the College of Business and Innovation. “Last year’s event was remarkable, and we are excited to stage another one this year so that hundreds of area professionals, as well as many UT students, will have an outstanding opportunity to learn, network and benefit from the presentations and discussions at this unique event.”

“As leaders are attempting to deal with the challenges of this turbulent economic environment, this event is a great way to discover new ideas for becoming a better leader and creating competitive advantage with people,” Longenecker said. “We invite them to come, be ready to learn, and be in a better position to make 2017 a great year.”

In 2008, KeyBank and the UT College of Business and Innovation presented the first Global Leaders Forum, which featured former Secretary of the U.S. Treasury Department John Snow, and the second event in 2013.

Parking is available, and a continental breakfast will be served.

Sales students across U.S. to participate in national sales competition at UT

Professional sales students from 30 universities across the United States will visit The University of Toledo College of Business and Innovation this weekend to compete in the second annual UT Invitational Sales Competition.

The sales competition will take place Friday and Saturday, Feb. 24 and 25, in classrooms and meeting rooms throughout the Savage & Associates Business Complex on Main Campus.

The first rounds of the competition will take place from 9:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Friday, followed by the wild-card round from 1:45 to 3 p.m., and quarterfinals from 4 to 5:40 p.m. The competition will conclude Saturday with the semifinals from 8:30 to 9:20 a.m. and the finals from 10:15 a.m. to 12:20 p.m.

The winners of the competition will be recognized at an awards luncheon at 1 p.m. Saturday in the Thompson Student Union Auditorium.

The UT Edward Schmidt School of Professional Sales organizes this first and only national sales competition dedicated exclusively to juniors, sophomores and freshmen because graduating seniors are typically already placed in jobs due to high corporate demand.

“We want to help businesses find top and available business-to-business professional sales talent while also giving universities a recruitment tool to grow their sales program enrollments,” said Deirdre Jones, director of the Edward Schmidt School of Professional Sales and the UT Invitational Sales Competition.

The event also will feature a career fair for participating students from 9:15 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday in the Driscoll Alumni Center with sales leaders and recruiters from 15 sponsoring companies.

More than 100 sales leaders and recruiters who participate serve as buyers and judges for the role plays and also interact with the students during coaching and interviewing sessions and the career fair.  

Sponsors include 3M, Owens Corning, Quicken Loans, Schindler Elevator Corp., Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co., Hilti, and Procter & Gamble Co.

Participating universities include Baylor, Florida State, Ball State, Oregon State, Temple and Indiana.

110 companies to recruit UT business students at spring job fair

Approximately 500 University of Toledo College of Business and Innovation students will participate in the college’s spring job fair Friday, Feb. 10, from 1 to 4 p.m. in the Thompson Student Union Auditorium.

Among the 110 companies recruiting business students on campus will be the Cleveland Clinic, Dana Inc., Lilly USA, Norfolk Southern Corp., Owens Corning, Owens-Illinois Inc., C.H. Robinson and ProMedica.

“Once again we are excited and happy for our students that so many well-known companies are coming to the UT College of Business and Innovation to find the talent they need,” said Dr. Terribeth Gordon-Moore, senior associate dean of the College of Business and Innovation. “This reflects very positively on the quality of both our programs and our students. It also demonstrates the extremely dynamic and mutually beneficial relationship enjoyed by the College of Business and Innovation and recruiters for major national companies.”

Employers are looking for undergraduate students to participate in business internships and their leadership development programs, as well as for seniors and graduates seeking full-time employment, according to Gordon-Moore. She encouraged UT business freshmen to attend the job fair and begin relationships with employers.

“This semiannual job fair is part of what we do to prepare our students for their futures,” Gordon-Moore said, adding that the college’s Business Career Programs office works year-round to assist students in acquiring internships and jobs upon graduation. “We strive to provide the necessary resources so our students can conduct their own tailored job searches.”

More than 85 percent of College of Business and Innovation students participate in internships, and the job placement rate for spring 2015 and 2016 business graduates was a record 93 percent.

Campus community members: Enter business innovation competition

UT students, faculty and staff who have a great business idea may win up to $10,000 to help make that idea a reality in the seventh annual business innovation competition sponsored by the College of Business and Innovation. Entries are due Monday, Feb. 27.

“The first six years of the business competition were a remarkable success as the College of Business and Innovation received dozens of entries from across UT campuses,” said Dr. Sonny Ariss, chair and professor of management. “We are expecting another tremendous array of entries this year and trust the contest will continue to advance a creative culture of growth in all areas of the University.

business-competition-poster-2017“Evidence of the extensive appeal of this annual competition is found in the fact that the first-place winner of last year’s competition was a UT music major, Mackenzie Miller, who claimed the $10,000 prize for her custom trumpet business, Miller Handcraft,” Ariss noted.

Dr. Gary Insch, dean of the College of Business and Innovation, said, “This annual business plan competition truly reflects our emphasis on supporting innovation, fostering creative thinking, and nurturing the entrepreneurial environment that is so essential for the economic growth of this region.”

“Entrepreneurship is not only for people who want to start a business,” Ariss said. “Corporate America also looks for innovative thinking from their employees, so intrapreneurship within the corporate business structure remains important. This is demonstrated by the fact that the college continues to have corporate partners — Owens-Illinois, PNC Bank and Chuck and Ann Hodge — who contribute prize money for the winners of this competition.”

Ariss said competition entries must be submitted using Lean Launch Pad concepts, which enables people to develop their business model upon nine basic building blocks: customer segments, value propositions, channels, customer relationships, revenue streams, key resources, key activities, key partnerships and cost structure.

“As we have every year, the College of Business and Innovation is again ready to offer guidance to help these teams effectively implement their plans, emerge beyond the University, create jobs, and enhance area economic growth,” Ariss added.

There is no cost to enter the competition. Registration must be completed online. Winners must prove that they have formed an LLC or S Corp in order to receive a financial award.

The College of Business and Innovation is providing the following prize money:

• First place: $10,000 (sponsored by Owens-Illinois Inc.);

• Second place: $5,000 (sponsored by Chuck and Ann Hodge Business Plan Competition Fund);

• Third place: $2,000 (sponsored by PNC Bank); and

• Honorable mention: $500 (sponsored by PNC Bank).

The timeline for the 2017 competition is:

• Those planning to enter the competition are invited to attend a workshop session Monday, Feb. 6, from noon to 1 p.m. in the Savage & Associates Business Complex PNC Entrepreneurship Lab Room 3100.

• Entries must be submitted by Monday, Feb. 27.

• Finalists will be announced Friday, March 24.

• Finalists will make an oral presentation about their business using the business model canvas Thursday, April 13, between noon and 5:30 p.m. in the Savage & Associates Business Complex PNC Entrepreneurship Lab Room 3100.

• Winners will be announced Thursday, April 20.

The competition is open to all UT students, faculty and staff, while alumni can participate as a member of a team involving current students, faculty or staff.

To register or for more information, go to utoledo.edu/business.

Students recruiting 800 volunteers to help feed families in hurricane-ravaged Haiti

Three months after Hurricane Matthew unleashed a path of destruction through the southern peninsula of Haiti, devastation lingers for families who lost their homes, crops and livestock.

KLAR“It’s horrible,” said Ashley Jemerson, who studied criminal justice, forensic science and Spanish at UT before graduating last month. “Seeing the ongoing effects of the natural disaster makes me grateful for everything we have here in the United States.”

Jemerson and dozens of UT students selected by their colleges to participate in the Klar Leadership Academy in the College of Business and Innovation need 800 volunteers Friday and Saturday, Jan. 27-28, in the Health Education Building on Main Campus to help produce 140,000 meals that will be sent to Haiti for hurricane relief.

Participants from the Klar Leadership Academy’s November community service project posed for a photo after conducting a Box Out Hunger event at the Cherry Street Mission.

Participants from the Klar Leadership Academy’s November community service project posed for a photo after conducting a Box Out Hunger event at the Cherry Street Mission.

The public is invited to participate in the two-day community service event called Feed My Starving Children, which is the culmination of a global service project organized by the Klar Leadership Academy’s 75 students to feed families in the country where food is scarce.

Volunteers may sign up for shifts here. Shifts are from 3 to 5 p.m. and from 7 to 9 p.m. Friday, Jan. 27, and from 9 to 11 a.m. and from noon to 2 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 28.

The 2016-17 Klar Leadership Academy students are 75 percent of the way to raising their goal of $31,000 to make the event called “Mobile Pack” a success.

“One of the biggest things we’ve learned in the academy is the importance of giving back,” said Anthony Dimodica, a senior studying human resource management. “Leadership also is about helping others. We’re hoping our University students, faculty and staff give up a little bit of their time to make a huge difference for people who don’t have a lot.”

The Klar Leadership Academy was founded in 2015 with the support of Steven Klar, a 1971 alumnus of the College of Business and Innovation and a New York City builder and real estate developer.

“The Klar Leadership Academy is all about creating the next generation of exceptional leaders who will carry on the College of Business and UT legacy of leaders who are changing the world,” said Dr. Clint Longenecker, Distinguished University Professor and director of the Center for Leadership and Organization Excellence in the College of Business and Innovation. “This learning experience takes our best students across all undergraduate colleges on campus and leads them through a seven-month, transformational leadership development experience to increase their career trajectory and their ability to improve the human condition through high-performance servant leadership.”

Division focused on advanced simulation technology for enriched learning

A strategic merger of key technology units at The University of Toledo is driving developments in advanced clinical and academic simulations for enriched learning for students across campus.

The Division of Technology and Advanced Solutions is comprised of the Department of Information Technology, the Center for Creative Instruction, the Advanced Simulation and Gaming Studio, and the Jacobs Interprofessional Immersive Simulation Center.

Christa Goodson, who is majoring in information technology, tested the Salesworld Leadership simulation game developed by UT’s Advanced Simulation and Gaming Studio and the Center for Creative Instruction.

Christa Goodson, who is majoring in information technology, tested the Salesworld Leadership simulation game developed by UT’s Advanced Simulation and Gaming Studio and the Center for Creative Instruction.

The synergy achieved by joining these groups positions the University as a leader in technological capability, according to Bill McCreary, UT vice president and chief information and technology officer, who created the division in 2015.

“This combined team of web developers, animators, 3D modelers, software engineers, game designers and various information technology professionals is building innovative new content for enhancing the educational experience across the University,” he said. “We are developing new interactive digital content to engage students and provide a unique learning experience to help them achieve success in their fields of study.”

The division is developing software for UT’s Edward H. Schmidt School of Professional Sales. Students have been testing the software this fall.

“Students have been practicing real-life scenarios in a sales management simulation,” said Dr. Ellen Pullins, Schmidt research professor of sales and sales management. “This program should really challenge students’ critical thinking skills and will ensure they are even better prepared when they start their careers.”

It is McCreary’s goal to continue to expand content to each college on campus and to meet the students where they are.

“Students shouldn’t have to come to a single location like the simulation center for this type of training,” he said. “It has to be for everybody, and it has to be portable. We are building this content for students to use the software on computers and headsets in their classroom at any campus location.”

The new technology could lead to a revenue source for the University, McCreary said. The division already has begun fostering partnerships to create and develop advanced digital content for local businesses and the national education market, and has created a virtual anatomy and physiology program for publisher McGraw-Hill.

The division has oversight of nearly every piece of computing technology on campus. The team of about 300 people, half of which are UT students, provides a variety of services for students, faculty, clinical professionals and staff.

“This unique collaboration also allows our staff within the Division of Technology and Advanced Solutions to explore different areas of technology and provides career-development opportunities,” McCreary said.

Distinguished educator to deliver commencement address Dec. 17

Toledo native Dr. Timothy Law Snyder, president of Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles, will present the keynote address at the UT fall commencement Saturday, Dec. 17, at 10 a.m. in Savage Arena.

Snyder, who will receive an honorary degree during the ceremony, will address 2,066 candidates for degrees: 93 doctoral, 584 master’s, 1,346 bachelor’s and 43 associate’s degrees.

Snyder

Snyder

The ceremony will be streamed live at http://video.utoledo.edu.

Snyder is a distinguished American educator and academic administrator whose career includes success as a computational mathematician, musician, published scholar, lecturer and podcaster. He attended Toledo Public Schools and graduated from UT in 1981 with bachelor’s degrees in both psychology and mathematics. Additionally, he earned a master’s degree in mathematics from UT in 1983.

Snyder also holds a second master’s degree, as well as a doctoral degree, in computational mathematics from Princeton University.

“We’re honored to have Dr. Timothy Snyder return to his alma mater as our fall commencement speaker,” said UT President Sharon L. Gaber. “His career is proof that goals can be multidirectional, and success follows people who work hard to make lasting contributions, no matter what career paths they choose over a lifetime.”

In 2014, The University of Toledo Alumni Association recognized Snyder with its College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics’ Outstanding Alumnus Award.

“I return to my hometown with pride and excitement to deliver the keynote commencement address. My educational path and career were profoundly shaped by my years at UT,” Snyder said. “I continue to resonate with UT’s mission to improve the human condition and advance knowledge, among its other values. I hope to inspire graduates to pursue their life goals with creativity and integrity.”

Snyder has held academic positions at Berklee College of Music in Boston, the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania and at Georgetown University, where he was chair of the Department of Computer Science and its first dean of science. Additionally, he served as dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Fairfield University in Connecticut and vice president for academic affairs at Loyola University Maryland. In 2015, Snyder was appointed the 16th president of Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles.

He has published and presented widely on his research, which includes computational mathematics, data structures, design and analysis of algorithms, geometric probability, digital signal processing, computer music, and the education of the millennial generation. More recently, he has been researching risk assessment in commercial airline safety, as well as HIV and its prevention.

A musician most of his life, Snyder was lead singer in the touring rock-and-punk band Whirlwind from 1976 to 1983. His music can be found on iTunes and SoundCloud. He is also active in social media through his Twitter handle @LMUSnyder.

The University’s fall commencement ceremony will recognize graduates from the colleges of Arts and Letters, Business and Innovation, Judith Herb College of Education, Health and Human Services, Medicine and Life Sciences, Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Nursing, and Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences.

Additionally, UT’s College of Engineering will hold graduation ceremonies for its undergraduate and graduate candidates Friday, Dec. 16, at 5:30 p.m. in Savage Arena.

For more information, visit utoledo.edu/commencement.