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UT, NOAA research team to host town hall on invasive species prevention in Great Lakes

A team of researchers at The University of Toledo and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) will host a public education forum to help prevent invasive species from entering the Great Lakes through bait shop retailers and their customers.

The public is invited to a town hall meeting at 8 p.m. Thursday, April 26, at the WGTE Public Media studio, 1270 S. Detroit Ave. in Toledo, to learn more about how non-native species may potentially find their way into the Great Lakes and what can be done to prevent it.

Dr. Carol Stepien, Distinguished University Professor of Ecology and research division leader at the NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory in Seattle, second from right, with researchers at UT Lake Erie Center.

In 2016, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency awarded UT researchers a nearly $500,000 grant through the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative for a three-year project to prevent invasive species from entering the Great Lakes through bait shops and pond stores.

The project is led by Dr. Carol Stepien, UT Distinguished University Professor of Ecology and research division leader at the NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory in Seattle, who is working with Dr. Kevin Czajkowski, UT professor of geography and planning, and Dr. Andrew Solocha, UT associate professor of finance.

“We found that bait shops sometimes accidentally sell non-native species mixed in with other bait,” Stepien said. “If non-native species such as silver carp become prevalent in the Great Lakes, it is predicted they could decimate valuable native species such as lake trout, walleye and yellow perch. They compete with these native species, depriving them of their food and habitat and can carry pathogens.”

The researchers sampled water from bait tanks for genetic material in 51 bait stores in 2016 and 2017 around Lake Erie. They found that 43 percent of the shops dispensed misidentified species. Using a technique called environmental DNA sampling, researchers sampled genetic material from bait tank water and found DNA evidence of invasive species such as silver carp, round goby, mosquitofish and tadpole snails in several bait shops.

These minnows were in a bowl at the UT Lake Erie Center, where researchers analyzed samples as part of a study to prevent invasive species from entering the Great Lakes through bait shop retailers and their customers.

“Retailers, customers and even some scientific experts are often unable to distinguish some of these invasive species from native species at early life stages,” Stepien said. “For example, many minnows may appear alike.”

The researchers also surveyed 217 anglers. Of those, 61 said they fished in Lake Erie.

“From our surveys, we found that 66 percent of Lake Erie anglers use live bait fish, and 50 percent of those reported discarding live bait into the water,” Stepien said. “This coupled with the instances of non-native bait in shops surrounding Lake Erie makes this region at definite risk of introduction of invasive species.”

The goal of the town hall meeting is to discuss the research findings and help the public and bait shop owners understand responsible measures they can take to prevent invasive species from entering the Great Lakes.

“Releasing non-native pets, bait and other organisms into waterways can have unpredictable and widespread effects on Lake Erie’s long-term ecological health,” Stepien said.

The team is also planning a voluntary “invasive free” certification program for retailers.

In addition to Stepien, the panel of experts will include representatives from the Toledo Zoo, Maumee Bait & Tackle, the Lake Erie Charter Boat Association and NOAA’s Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory.

Three Distinguished University Lecturers named

Three faculty members have been named Distinguished University Lecturers in recognition of their exemplary teaching, supporting student success, and demonstrating their commitment to UT’s educational mission.

The newest Distinguished University Lecturers, who were approved and recognized by the UT Board of Trustees April 16, are Amy O’Donnell of the College of Business and Innovation; Sherry Tripepi in the School of Social Justice in the College of Health and Human Services; and Sara Yaklin of the College of Arts and Letters.

Distinguished University Lecturers, from left, Sara Yaklin, Amy O’Donnell and Sherry Tripepi were recognized during an April 19 awards ceremony.

“It is a privilege to honor these outstanding faculty members who are accomplished in their fields and who are dedicated to sharing their expertise with students,” said Dr. Andrew Hsu, provost and executive vice president for academic affairs. “Every day, they make a difference in so many lives at this institution and in our community.”

O’Donnell joined the University as a lecturer in the Department of Management in 2004 and was promoted to senior lecturer in 2015.

She has received University and college awards for excellent teaching and dedication to students. O’Donnell has developed new courses and programs, facilitated student success initiatives, and supported the Business Career Programs Office in the College of Business. In addition, she served as faculty advisor to the UT chapter of Alpha Kappa Psi Business Fraternity. O’Donnell also has presented at 19 regional conferences.

“I have always felt respected and supported by College of Business and Innovation students, faculty and staff. This appointment as a Distinguished Lecturer at the University level further validates that my efforts are valued and meaningful by our community,” O’Donnell said. “I am humbled and proud.”

Tripepi started working as a clinical social worker in the University Counseling Center in 1997. Ten years later, she was named a visiting assistant professor of social work. In 2010, Tripepi became a lecturer in the Social Work Program and was promoted to associate lecturer in 2013.

She has received teaching, service and student impact awards. Tripepi serves as director of the Social Work Bachelor’s Degree Program, field coordinator, internship supervisor and continuing education coordinator for the UT Social Work Program through the Ohio Board of Counselors, Marriage and Family Therapists, and Social Workers. In addition, she developed a new course on social work practice with the LGBTQ population and has helped develop and implement campus-wide training programs — including Safe Place and anti-bullying programs — at area schools.

“I feel very honored and appreciative of this recognition,” Tripepi said. “I feel social work is the best career as it has allowed me to bring my passion to work each day. And for the past 11 years, I have been fortunate to be able to bring this passion to the classroom. I have fantastic students, who I want to thank for allowing me to join them in their professional journey and nurture their passion along the way. I also have such wonderful colleagues and am forever grateful for their support and teamwork.”

Yaklin was named a lecturer in 2001 and was promoted to senior lecturer in 2009. She received a master of arts degree in English language and literature from UT.

She is a founding co-director of the Composition Institute for Teaching Excellence and is a composition instructor and program contributor for the Multicultural Emerging Scholars Summer Bridge Program. Yaklin also was a presenter at the Multicultural Orientation and Resources for Excellence Institute. In addition to mentoring teaching assistants in the English Department, Yaklin participates in the University Common Read Program and is a writing consultant, tutor, editor and mentor at UT, Owens Community College and local organizations. She recently received an Innovations in Teaching Award for a community partner pilot program for scientific and technical report writing students.

“Each day, I am grateful for the opportunity to do what I love in teaching and working with students. I have a dream job,” Yaklin said. “My program director, department chair, college deans, co-director and colleagues all deserve recognition and thanks for making it a dream job. I am deeply appreciative of the University’s honoring of faculty through these awards.”

2018 Pacemaker Awards honor UT alumnus, outstanding business students

The University of Toledo College of Business and Innovation and the Business Engagement and Leadership Council will recognize both business and academic excellence during their 55th annual Pacemaker Awards Friday, April 13, at the Inverness Country Club.

The 2018 Business Pacemaker Award will be presented to Alan H. Barry, a 1966 graduate of the UT College of Business, who is a certified public accountant, retired president and chief operating officer of the Fortune 200 company Masco Corp., and a member of the UT Foundation’s Board of Trustees.

Barry

Barry joined Brass Craft Manufacturing Co. in 1972 as controller and became president of the Masco division in 1988. In 1996, he became a group president of Masco, a manufacturer of home improvement and building products. He has broad business experience that includes finance, manufacturing, customer development, acquisitions and general operating management.

Barry currently serves on the board of directors of the H. W. Kaufman Financial Group. He is the retired director of Arch Aluminum & Glass Co. Inc., Scotts Miracle Gro Co., and IPS Corp. He also served as an executive board member of the Plumbing Manufacturing Institute from 1985 through 2000, and as chairman of the institute in 1994. In addition, Barry served on the executive board of the associate member division of the American Supply Association during 1995 and 1996.

Barry and his wife, Karen, a 1964 UT alumna, have a history of philanthropy at The University of Toledo. In 2014, the University named a new accounting lab in the College of Business and Innovation for Alan Barry. At the time the lab was established, it was the first one nationwide to have a certified management accountant license, in which students could access for free the review material from Wiley, a leading provider of educational programs for professionals and students who are preparing for the certified management accountant exam.

The couple also endowed the Alan and Karen Barry Scholarship Fund, which provides support for full-time UT business accounting students based on both merit and needs.

Alan Barry, a native of Toledo, is an active member of the UT Alumni Association’s Phoenix chapter, is involved in UT’s Blue Key organization, and serves on the executive committee for the children’s charity Variety.

In 2017 the Barrys donated a $1 million gift to establish an endowment that supports the Alan H. and Karen A. Barry Endowed Professorship in Accounting at The University of Toledo.

“Recipients of the Pacemaker Award over the past five decades read as a who’s who of current and legendary business leaders in the Toledo region,” said Dr. Hassan HassabElnaby, interim dean of the UT College of Business and Innovation, “and Alan Barry certainly belongs in that impressive roster. The Pacemaker Award is the College of Business and Innovation’s highest honor, recognizing individuals for outstanding achievement in business, as well as contributions to the community and the University.

“We are also pleased to recognize the excellence of students from each of our departments through the Student Pacemaker Awards,” Hassan HassabElnaby said.

Student Pacemaker Awards are presented to UT College of Business and Innovation graduate and undergraduate students for their outstanding academic achievement, University and community service, and leadership.

The 2018 student Pacemakers are: Master of Business Administration — Aanchal Senapati and Mitchell Howard; Master of Science in Accountancy — Tyler Hecht; Accounting — Martin Linthicum and Sarah Avina; Finance — Alex Odenweller and Brianne Michel; Information Operations Technology Management — Brandon Stewart and Lindsey Wittenauer; Management — Kathleen Kurman and Jenna Jeffers; Marketing and International Business — Haley Orr and Amanda Martin; and Dean’s Recipient — Julia Foley.

UT to host inaugural Lessons in LeadHERship Conference April 17

USA Today columnist Christine Brennan will be among the speakers for The University of Toledo women’s basketball program’s inaugural Lessons in LeadHERship Conference Tuesday, April 17.

The event will take place from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the Thompson Student Union.

The conference was designed to help grow female leadership in the Toledo community and is being sponsored by UT alumna Kelly Savage from Savage & Associates.

“I’m excited to kick off this annual leadership conference,” Toledo Head Women’s Basketball Coach Tricia Cullop said. “I hope any female in our community who wants to improve their leadership skill, no matter their age, will attend the conference. We have some outstanding speakers in various fields who have conquered many obstacles on their paths to success. I have no doubt this will be an inspiring day.”

Brennan’s talk is titled “Today is the Greatest Day to be a Woman in America: Until Tomorrow.” The Toledo native is an award-winning national columnist, commentator and best-selling author.

In addition to Brennan, Savage and Cullop, speakers for the one-day conference will include UT President Sharon L. Gaber; Tonya Rider, retired Toledo detective, who joined the Bowling Green State University Health and Human Services faculty; Chrys Peterson, leadership consultant and former news anchor; Dr. Clint Longenecker, Distinguished University Professor and director of the UT Center for Leadership and Organizational Excellence; Charlene Gilbert, dean of the UT College of Arts and Letters; and Dr. Stephanie Pannell, UT assistant professor of surgery, who specializes in colorectal surgery and surgical oncology.

Danielle Dwyer, WTOL sports anchor, will serve as the emcee.

The cost to attend is $50 per individual and $25 for high school and college students. The fee to attend also includes continental breakfast and lunch.

Attendees also can purchase a Layup Package ($250), which includes four tickets and name recognition throughout the event. Another possible option is a Free-Throw Package ($500), which includes eight tickets, name recognition throughout the event, and a booth with your company’s information. The final ticket option is a Three-Point Package ($1,000), which includes 16 tickets, name recognition throughout the event, and a booth with your company’s information.

For more information or to purchase tickets, contact Lauren Flaum, UT director of women’s basketball operations, at 419.530.2363 or email lauren.flaum2@utoledo.edu.

New book offers strategies on working with needy people

In his latest book, “Needy People: Working Successfully With Control Freaks and Approval-holics,” Dr. Dale Dwyer immediately identifies a work situation everyone encounters.

“We all know them — the control freaks and approval-holics of our organizations and our lives. These are the people who drive us crazy at work,” he said.

The UT professor of management suggests that their annoying behaviors have their roots in high needs for control, approval or both.

“We’ll call the person who most drives you crazy at work ‘Chuck.’ Everybody has a Chuck, and everybody’s Chuck is different,” Dwyer said.

Dwyer notes that we all have a need for control and a need for approval, but it is the extreme cases that cause frustration for leaders, direct reports and co-workers who have to deal with them every day.

Through his consultations with leaders, both new and experienced, Dwyer identified six key challenges for people high in needs for control and approval:

• Lack of emotional control — impatience, anger management, bullying;

• Inability or unwillingness to delegate;

• Lack of communication skills — interpersonal and fear of public speaking;

• Inability or unwillingness to deal with conflict;

• Tendency toward perfectionism; and

• Difficulty in making decisions.

Throughout the book, Dwyer takes readers through an extensive self-analysis process so they can improve on their own ability to better deal with the Chucks in their lives.

“Needy People” offers self-assessment techniques, explores how control and approval needs influence key challenges, discusses the “myth of perfection,” and looks at the ramifications of these challenges on trustworthiness within work relationships, suggesting some ways to address them — including what to do about them if they arise with your “Chuck.”

Dwyer hopes that “readers of the book will learn how to spot the triggers for control and approval so that we can all improve our ability to work with and lead the control freaks and approval-holics of our organizations and our communities.”

“Needy People: Working Successfully With Control Freaks and Approval-holics” is available in print and Kindle versions on Amazon.com, and through Amazon in 12 countries, as well as through Audible and iTunes.

Dwyer joined the UT faculty in 1989 and is a former chair of the Department of Management in the College of Business and Innovation. He received one of the University’s Outstanding Teacher Awards, as well as the first UT Student Impact Award.

He is the author of the top-selling SHRM-published book, “Got a Minute? The 9 Lessons Every HR Professional Must Learn” (2010), as well as “Got A Solution? HR Approaches to 5 Common and Persistent Business Problems” (2014), both with co-author Dr. Sheri A. Caldwell.

Remembering John F. Savage: Businessman, benefactor, father

Twenty-five years ago, John F. Savage passed away at age 62. This has been an emotional time for me as I reflect on his life and how much I have missed him the last quarter of a century. 

Many in the financial services industry knew John as a mesmerizing speaker whose memorable quips and concise financial lessons inspired thousands. Locally, John was known for founding and building — along with his brother, Bob — a successful, independent and diversified financial services firm, Savage & Associates. 

John and Mary Kay Savage smiled at the 1988 press conference when it was announced Centennial Hall would be renamed John F. Savage Hall. A 1952 UT alumnus, Savage was co-chair of a campaign that raised $10 million for the facility, which later adopted the name John F. Savage Arena. The longtime University benefactor was a past president of the UT Alumni Association and a former member of the UT Foundation Board of Trustees. He received an honorary doctorate from the University in 1985.

He is known equally or more in northwest Ohio from the countless known (and many unknown) philanthropic efforts, primarily fundraising in service of the poor, the Catholic Church and The University of Toledo.

Me, along with my eight siblings, knew John Savage as dad, and I am sharing from that perspective. The story I will share about John Savage is not known by many and will truly put in perspective how his success was so improbable. It is truly an “only in America” story.

My father grew up in what, at best, could be described as a working-class neighborhood in Toledo with his eight siblings in a small home. His mom died when he was 7 leaving his father to raise nine children while owning a small corner grocery store, Savage Market. Out of necessity, all nine worked in the grocery store. This scenario does not seem like the right recipe to produce a man who would later be inducted into the City of Toledo Hall of Fame for his philanthropic and business achievements, but it did. His family instilled a work ethic, values, and a burning desire to do better.

He and all eight siblings remarkably graduated from college, and he began an entrepreneurial career in his 20s. 

John Savage and his son, Sean, 18, posed for a photo during a trip to Alaska in 1989.

By the time I came along as the eighth child of my parents, the business was growing, and his community work was well-known. 

How did John Savage go from growing up poor and without a mom to advising CEOs of Fortune 500 companies, raising millions of dollars for charity, and, with my mom, building a strong family?

From my view, there are a few key ingredients:

• Positive energy. My dad exuded confidence and positive energy to everyone he encountered. People loved being around my dad because they felt better about themselves and what they could accomplish. He was on his death bed and still positive and thankful.

• Work ethic. He was a relentless worker and was driven to do well in all endeavors. He rose early and worked late. He poured everything he had in every day. He instilled a work ethic in us children that, for me, has lasted a lifetime. Even when my parents were able to give us things, they took the better and less traveled route of “teaching us how to fish instead of giving us a fish.”

• Values. My dad did the right thing. He was principled and led by example. His commitment to high standards in business and in his personal life was a tremendous example to me and my siblings. What a blessing for a child to witness in their parents.

• Guts. He started with nothing and so his view was that he was risking nothing by taking chances in life. He was fearless in asking for business and raising money for causes.

• Loyal. Even after becoming a household name in Toledo and the industry, he never forgot his roots. He remained a loyal friend to the guys from the old neighborhood and was forever grateful to The University of Toledo for allowing him to be educated on a nothing budget.

• Humble. After all the success and accolades, he remained grounded. He made sure all his children understood what it took to do well in life, and once you do well to not change.

• Balance. My dad believed in a life-work balance, which involved a focus on family, spirituality, work, physical well-being, and doing acts of charity. He was far from perfect, but he did a good job in each of these areas.

Twenty-five years ago, I was just out of college and about 120 days from getting married. My dad’s death shook me at my core, but I turned to the valuable life lessons I was so fortunate to have been taught by my parents. 

Today, my wife, Carolyn, and I feel so blessed with our six children, and I feel particularly blessed to walk into an office each day my dad walked into for so many years. 

Looking back, I am still amazed at how far my father came in his life, and the good fortune I had to be under the same roof with him for 22 years. God speed, dad!

Sean Savage is a financial adviser at Savage & Associates in Toledo.

Management expert pens business survival guide

As director of the UT College of Business and Innovation’s Center for Leadership and Organizational Excellence and as a Distinguished University Professor, Dr. Clinton Longenecker consistently strives to encourage people to establish and achieve significant goals in their lives. He has bolstered these efforts to help people on campus and around the world by publishing his most recent book, “The Successful Career Survival Guide.”

“This book is all about helping people realize their full potential as a professional and as a person,” Longenecker said. “My goal is to provide the tools and resources to help people think bigger. This book is a collection of over 700 best practices, key research findings, leadership tools, power quotes, and game-changing career advice to inspire and dramatically improve your workplace performance and career trajectory.”

“I was inspired by H. Jackson Brown’s 1991 best-selling ‘Life’s Little Instruction Book,’ which was a collection of practical wisdom to help people live better lives, so I used the same format and approach in writing this book to help people improve their work lives and career trajectory.”

He explained the book discusses 12 career success and survival imperatives based on decades of research with high-performance professionals across key sectors of the world economy, including “the No. 1 factor for career success and survival in the 21st century: getting desired results for your enterprise. Readers will have the opportunity to explore how to take better control of their time resource, how to implement fundamental practices for improving their personal effectiveness, and specific practices for improving workplace productivity and effectiveness.”

Longenecker is an award-winning business educator, author, researcher, consultant and speaker. He has been the recipient of more than 50 outstanding teaching, service and research awards, as well as numerous industry awards, including the Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year, Toastmasters International Leadership Award, and the Jefferson Award for Outstanding Public Service, in addition to numerous “best professor” recognitions. He also has been recently recognized by The Economist as one of the Top 15 Business Professors in the World.

“The Successful Career Survival Guide”:

• Explores the importance of creating focus and ongoing alignment with the constantly changing demands of your job.

• Discusses how to improve your working relationship with your boss.

• Provides specific practices to help you better understand the power associated with creating great workplace relationships, networks, and building and demonstrating great emotional intelligence.

• Explains the importance of ongoing learning and personal development and the necessity of ongoing problem solving, process improvement, and effective workplace change and improvement.

• Provides a treasure trove of ideas, concepts and key practices for developing your workplace professionalism and character.

“This book is designed to challenge your thinking about your approach to work and provide you with ideas and practices to help you improve both your career mindset and your workplace performance while having fun,” Longenecker said. “It also presents some important research findings on how to implement the key practices that will help you get better results for your employer and improve your long-term career trajectory.”

The guide has some big fans.

John Caponigro, CEO of Sports Management Network Inc., said, “‘The Successful Career Survival Guide’ is a wonderful collection of great business lessons and best practices for everyone who wants to advance their career and be the best person, professional and leader that they can be. Clint has had a career of transforming people’s lives, and this book provides real insight on his success.”

“Clint’s ‘Successful Career Survival Guide’ is a gift to every lifelong learner,” said Chuck Stocking, CEO of Principle Industries Inc. “Timeless truths deserve to be shared and can make a huge impact on receptive thinkers who care to be transformative.”

“Ultimately,” Longenecker explained, “the book provides people with an opportunity to learn how to best develop their talents, as well as how to develop a personal performance improvement plan using tried and true practices that translate into better performance. In the end, it is critically important to realize that each one of us must take control of the factors that impact our career and our lives and that we are all capable of doing great things.”

Women’s basketball player selected First-Team Academic All-America

Senior Jay-Ann Bravo-Harriott has been named to the 2017-18 College Sports Information Directors of America Academic All-America First Team.

Bravo-Harriott becomes only the fourth player in school history to earn this prestigious honor and first since Kim Knuth during the 1998-99 campaign. 

The 5-foot-10 guard averaged 12.7 points, 3.5 rebounds, 2.3 assists and 0.6 steals in 29.3 minutes per game this past season. The three-time all-league honoree ranks sixth in the Mid-American Conference in three-point field-goals made (74), 10th in three-point field-goal percentage (.374, 74 of 198), and 20th in scoring.

The three-time Academic All-District selection concluded the regular season eighth in UT annals in three-point field-goal attempts and 10th in three-point field goals made in the single-season record book. Bravo-Harriott made at least four triples on a team-high eight occasions during the year, including a program-tying best eight at archrival Bowling Green Jan. 27.  

The London native graduated in December with a degree in communication and a minor in general business and a perfect 4.0 GPA. She is working on a master of business administration degree. 

She is joined on the first team by New Mexico’s Cherise Beynon, Idaho’s Mikayla Ferenz, Ball State’s Carmen Grande and Kent State’s Jordan Korinek.

As of March 15, Bravo-Harriott was third in school history in three-point field goals made (240) and three-point field-goal attempts (672), eighth in minutes played (3,525), 10th in three-point field-goal percentage (.357, 240 of 672), and 13th in scoring (1,426 points).

Toledo’s Academic All-America Honorees
Jay-Ann Bravo-Harriott (First Team), 2017-18
Kim Knuth (Second Team), 1998-99
Angela Drake (Second Team), 1998-99
Dana Drew (First Team), 1994-95
Dana Drew (First Team), 1993-94

Olympic gold medalist to talk business March 22

John Naber, Olympic gold medal winner and sportscaster, will visit The University of Toledo to give the Edwin Dodd Distinguished Lecture Series in Business Ethics.

The public is invited to hear him speak Thursday, March 22, at 7 p.m. in the Driscoll Alumni Center Auditorium.

Naber

Naber’s presentation is titled “Pursuing Victory With Honor.”

In today’s difficult business environment, the temptation to “cut corners” has never been greater. Delivering his remarks in a friendly and unthreatening manner, Naber enables his audiences to learn how to succeed without violating ethical standards. He believes that nice guys can finish first.

In 1976, Naber became the most highly decorated member of the U.S. Olympic Team, winning four gold medals and one silver, and setting four world records in the sport of swimming. In the process, he became the first swimmer in Olympic history to win two individual medals on the same day.

One year later, he led his school, the University of Southern California, to his and its fourth consecutive undefeated season and national title, and won the James E. Sullivan Award as the nation’s outstanding amateur athlete.

Moving to broadcasting, Naber worked for all the major networks and almost every cable channel covering his sport at local, national and international meets. In 1984, he was inducted into the U.S. Olympic Committee Hall of Fame, just two days before he carried the Olympic torch, and later the Olympic flag, into the Los Angeles Olympic opening ceremony. In 1986, Naber began working as a play-by-play announcer, covering sports as varied as motorcross, skiing, gymnastics, football, bowling and equestrian events. He has hosted coverage for more than 30 different sports and for seven Olympic Games.

As a keen observer of excellence, Naber has discovered the method by which champions in all walks of life use to reach their goals, and he shares this process along with his personal insights to audiences all over the globe.

Sponsored by Dana Inc. and Owens-Illinois Inc., and co-hosted by the UT College of Business and Innovation, the College of Law, and the Jesup Scott Honors College, the event is free, but registration is requested at utoledo.edu/business/edwindodd.

The Edwin Dodd Distinguished Lecture Series in Business Ethics celebrates the legacy of the late chairman, CEO and president of Owens-Illinois Corp. Established in 2003 through a collaborative effort led by the Dodd Family with partners Owens-Illinois and the Dana Corp., this fund was established as an enduring memorial to Dodd, spotlighting his work in the business world and the Toledo community. The purpose of the fund is to support the ongoing Distinguished Lecture Series in Business Ethics.

The fund is housed in the College of Business and Innovation and partners with both Dana Corp. and Owens-Illinois with representatives sitting on the planning committee, along with a member of the Dodd family, with the goal of leveraging national networks to identify and feature experts in the field on a biannual basis.

Three Distinguished University Professors named

Three faculty members have been named Distinguished University Professors in recognition of their exemplary teaching, research, scholarship and professional service.

The newest Distinguished University Professors, who were approved and recognized by the UT Board of Trustees at its February meeting, are Dr. Abdollah Afjeh of the College of Engineering, Dr. Paul Chongkun Hong of the College of Business and Innovation, and Dr. Joseph Slater of the College of Law.

UT Board of Trustees Chair Steven M. Cavanaugh, left, and UT President Sharon L. Gaber posed for a photo with the new Distinguished University Professors, from left, Dr. Paul Hong, Dr. Abdollah Afjeh and Dr. Joseph Slater. The three faculty members received the honor in recognition of their exemplary teaching, research, scholarship and professional service.

“It is an honor to recognize the careers of these outstanding faculty members who are accomplished experts recognized for advancing their fields of study and who are great teachers dedicated to sharing their knowledge with our students,” said Dr. Andrew Hsu, provost and executive vice president for academic affairs.

Afjeh, chair and professor of mechanical, industrial and manufacturing engineering, joined UT in 1984. He is a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and an internationally recognized researcher in propulsion and energy conversion systems.

Afjeh’s focus is on the development and validation of computational models that are used to predict behavior of aerospace propulsion systems under flight conditions. His work supports the design and development of aircraft engines and small gas turbine engines. He also has been working on comprehensive aeromechanics analysis of utility-scale wind turbines.

“I am profoundly honored by this recognition,” Afjeh said. “I am deeply grateful to my colleagues and students who inspired me and fueled my passion for learning. This honor is also a recognition of the great work of my talented students who knew no boundaries and believed in impossible things.”

Afjeh has received 49 research awards for more than $22 million and has authored 115 peer-reviewed publications. He received UT’s Outstanding Researcher Award in 2014.

Hong, professor of information operations and technology management, joined UT in 1999. He is an internationally recognized researcher in network capabilities,
global supply chain management, international comparative studies, and building growth engine industries for national
competitiveness.

Hong’s expertise is in the implementation of supply chain management practices to build firms for domestic advantage and global competitiveness. Much of his work has been in the service sector, notably, U.S. health-care industries as well.

“This recognition is about the value of teaching, research and outreach of business faculty for the world at large,” Hong said. “I accept this honor along with my colleagues here at The University of Toledo and around the world who have worked with me over the years.”

Hong, who was selected as Fulbright Scholar in 2017, has published more than 200 peer-reviewed articles and three books. He received UT’s Outstanding Researcher Award in 2015.

Slater, the Eugene N. Balk Professor of Law and Values, joined UT in 1999. He is the nation’s leading expert in public-sector labor law respected in academia, as well as by practicing attorneys, the courts, and national and international media.

Slater’s work has influenced two separate fields of study — labor history and modern labor law. He is an expert witness on the history of labor law.

“This means a lot to me. I know The University of Toledo employs many outstanding faculty, excellent scholars and excellent teachers. I am deeply honored to join the ranks of law school colleagues past and present, as well as the amazingly impressive Distinguished University Professors from other colleges,” Slater said. “Also, I am pleased because this award reflects the importance of the field of labor and employment law, and the study of unions, workers and employers, in this community and beyond.”

Slater, who is a Fellow of the College of Labor and Employment Lawyer, has published four extensively cited books and 29 peer-reviewed articles and essays. He received UT’s Outstanding Researcher Award in 2016.