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Law faculty member wins Fulbright grant to research women’s housing advocacy in Ecuador

Shelley Cavalieri, UT associate professor of law, was awarded a prestigious Fulbright grant to conduct research on women’s housing advocacy in Quito, Ecuador.

She will teach law courses in gender theory, housing and health, and clinical legal education at the Universidad de San Francisco de Quito.

Cavalieri

Gender and housing are crucial issues in Ecuador due to an extreme gender pay gap, rapid urbanization, and the inadequacy of housing. Cavalieri proposes using socio-legal methods to conduct her research — working closely with citizen activists, nongovernmental organizations, local academic experts, and government officials.

“The housing issues that are central to my Fulbright proposal are rooted in the same questions of citizen engagement in and government response to the problems of urban life that form my research at home,” Cavalieri said. “My Toledo experiences will shape my research in Quito, and my time in Ecuador will enrich my work in Toledo.”

Cavalieri teaches property law at the University. She is a leading expert on human trafficking, land reform and land banking. Her research focuses on feminist legal theory and economic, social and cultural rights.

She is a graduate of the University of Virginia, where she received a bachelor of arts degree in bioethics, and the University of California at Berkeley, where she received a law degree. 

“Being selected for a Fulbright is one of the highest honors that an academic can achieve,” said D. Benjamin Barros, dean of the UT College of Law. “During her Fulbright, Professor Cavalieri will be doing important research on the impact of women’s advocacy in improving housing access and quality. She also will be a wonderful ambassador for the College of Law and the University.”

Recipients of Fulbright awards are selected on the basis of academic and professional achievement, as well as record of service and leadership potential in their respective fields.

Cavalieri will spend the 2018-19 academic year in Ecuador. She is one of only a handful of law professors at the University to receive this honor.

The Fulbright Scholar Program offers grants to American faculty, administrators and professionals to teach and conduct research abroad. The program is sponsored by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs and administered by the Center for International Studies and Programs at The University of Toledo.

Law professor awarded visiting fellowship at Princeton University

Lee J. Strang, UT professor of law, recently was awarded a visiting fellowship at Princeton University for the 2018-19 academic year.

As a James Madison Program Fellow, Strang will continue historical and archival research on religion and legal education. 

Strang

While in residence, he will focus on completing his latest book, “The History of Catholic Legal Education: Struggles Over Identity.” The book is believed to be the first comprehensive historical study of Catholic legal education in the United States.

“This fellowship is a tremendous opportunity to learn from excellent scholars while writing my history of Catholic legal education,” Strang said.

He is the John W. Stoepler Professor of Law and Values at the UT College of Law. He teaches in the areas of constitutional law, property law, administrative law, federal courts and appellate practice.

Strang was appointed to the Ohio Advisory Committee of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights in 2016. The following year, he received the UT Outstanding Faculty Research and Scholarship Award. 

He is a leading scholar on constitutional law and interpretation, property law, and religion and the First Amendment. His publications include “How Big Data Increases Originalism’s Methodological Rigor: Using Corpus Linguistics to Recover Original Language Conventions,” which was published in the University of California at Davis Law Review in 2017, and “Originalism’s Promise,” which is forthcoming from Cambridge University Press. He is editing the third edition of a unique multi-volume modular casebook, “Federal Constitutional Law,” for Carolina Academic Press. 

“The award of this prestigious fellowship recognizes both Professor Strang’s scholarly achievements to date and the promise of his scholarship in the future,” said D. Benjamin Barros, dean of the UT College of Law. “Already a nationally recognized expert in constitutional law, this fellowship will allow Professor Strang to work on an important new book on Catholic legal education.”

The James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions is sponsored by the Department of Politics at Princeton University. The program is dedicated to the pursuit of scholarly excellence in the fields of constitutional law and political thought.

Faculty members receive promotion, tenure

A number of faculty members received tenure and promotion for the 2017-18 academic year approved in April by the UT Board of Trustees.

Faculty members who received tenure were:

College of Law
• Michelle Cavalieri
• Bryan Lammon

Faculty members who received tenure and promotion to associate professor were:

College of Arts and Letters
• Daniel Hernandez, Art
• Dr. Thor Mednick, Art
• Dr. Liat Ben-Moshe, Disability Studies
• Dr. Jason Levine, Psychology
• Daniel Thobias, Theatre and Film

College of Business and Innovation
• Dr. Kainan Wang, Finance
• Dr. Joseph Cooper, Management

College of Engineering
• Dr. Halim Ayan, Bioengineering
• Dr. Eda Yildirim-Ayan, Bioengineering

College of Health and Human Services
• Dr. Aravindhan Natarajan, School of Social Justice

College of Medicine and Life Sciences
• Dr. David Heidt, Surgery

College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics
• Dr. Rafael Garcia-Mata, Biological Sciences

College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences
• Dr. Wissam AbouAlaiwi, Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics

Faculty members promoted to professor were:

College of Arts and Letters
• Dr. Mysoon Rizk, Art
• Dr. Sujata Shetty, Geography and Planning
• Dr. Jami Taylor, Political Science and Public Administration
• Dr. Edmund Lingan, Theatre and Film

College of Business and Innovation
• Dr. Margaret Hopkins, Management
• Dr. Bashar Gammoh, Marketing and International Business

College of Engineering
• Dr. Scott Molitor, Bioengineering
• Dr. Sridhar Viamajala, Civil and Environmental Engineering
• Dr. Youngwoo Seo, Civil and Environmental Engineering
• Dr. Devinder Kaur, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
• Dr. Gursel Serpen, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
• Dr. Chunhua Sheng, Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering
• Dr. Hongyan Zhang, Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

College of Health and Human Services
• Dr. Tavis Glassman, School of Population Health
• Dr. Sheryl Milz, School of Population Health

Judith Herb College of Education
• Dr. Tod Shockey, Curriculum and Instruction
• Dr. Florian Feucht, Educational Foundations and Leadership

College of Law
• Elizabeth McCuskey
• Evan Zoldan

College of Medicine and Life Sciences
• Dr. Azedine Medhkour, Neurosurgery

College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics
• Dr. Tomer Avidor-Reiss, Biological Sciences
• Dr. Maria Diakonova, Biological Sciences
• Dr. Michael Weintraub, Environmental Sciences

College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences
• Dr. Amanda Bryant-Friedrich, Medicinal and Biological Chemistry
• Dr. Frederick Williams, Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics

Faculty members promoted to associate professor were:

College of Medicine and Life Sciences
• Dr. Sumon Nandi, Orthopaedic Surgery
• Dr. Terrence Lewis, Radiology

Faculty members recognized for outstanding scholarly and creative activity

With the support of University Libraries and a subcommittee organized by the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs, President Sharon L. Gaber and Provost Andrew Hsu have recognized 26 faculty members from across campus with outstanding contributions in scholarly or creative activity over the past three years.

These contributions include articles in leading scientific journals with high standing that have attracted significant attention in the community; monographs that were published by premier academic presses that have received positive external reviews; and exhibits or performances of creative activity that have received high acclaim.

“I am pleased that the University Libraries contributed by identifying UT faculty articles and books published in preeminent journals and publishing houses,” said Beau Case, dean of University Libraries.

“Faculty members are raising the profile of The University of Toledo across the breadth of disciplines and programs at UT,” said Dr. Frank Calzonetti, vice president for research. “The excellent work of faculty members in disciplines outside of science and engineering is quite impressive and sometimes goes unnoticed.

“All too often research grant dollars are associated with faculty scholarly and creative activity,” Calzonetti said. “In some disciplines, such as in biomedical science, faculty members cannot sustain their research programs that lead to discoveries and publications without external funding to support laboratory needs. However, in many disciplines, such as pure mathematics or history, external funding is not as critical to faculty success in scholarly and creative activity.”

“Given the many faculty members who have had outstanding contributions in scholarly and creative activity over the past three years, it was a tall order to determine just 26 who should be recognized at this time,” said Dr. Ruth Hottell, chair and professor of the Department of World Languages and Cultures, and selection committee member.

The following faculty members were recognized:

• Dr. Abdollah Afjeh of the Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering;

• Dr. Ana C. Alba-Rubio of the Department of Chemical Engineering;

• Dr. Melissa Baltus of the Department of Sociology and Anthropology;

• Dr. Joe Elhai of the Department of Psychology;

• Dr. Kristen Geaman of the Department of History;

• Dr. Blair Grubb of the Department of Medicine;

• Daniel Hernandez of the Department of Art;

• Dr. Terry Hinds of the Department of of Physiology and Pharmacology;

• Dr. Bina Joe of the Department of Physiology and Pharmacology;

• Dr. Dong-Shik Kim of the Department of Chemical Engineering;

• Dr. Kristin Kirschbaum of the Instrumentation Center;

• Dr. Ashok Kumar of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering;

• Dr. Beata Lecka-Czernik of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery;

• Dr. Barbara Mann of the Jesup Scott Honors College;

• Elizabeth McCuskey of the College of Law;

• Dr. Thor Mednick of the Department of Art;

• Dr. Munier Nazzal of the Department of Surgery;

• Dr. Kim E. Nielsen of the Department of Disability Studies;

• Dr. Michael Rees of the Department of Urology;

• Dr. Denise Ritter Bernardini of the Department of Music;

• Dr. Donald Ronning of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry;

• Stephen Sakowski of the Department of Theatre and Film;

• Dr. Yanfa Yan of the Department of Physics and Astronomy;

• Dr. Matt Yockey of the Department of Theatre and Film;

• Rebecca Zietlow of the College of Law; and

• Evan Zoldan of the College of Law.

Outstanding staff members celebrated

Five employees received the University’s 2018 Outstanding Staff Awards.

More than 20 nominees were honored at a ceremony April 26 in the Thomas and Elizabeth Brady Engineering Innovation Center.

Winners this year were:

Tiffany Akeman, clerkship and curriculum coordinator in the Department of Radiation Oncology. She has worked at the University since 2010. She received a master of public health degree and a certificate in gerontological practice from UT in 2014 and 2016, respectively.

“As one of her direct and immediate supervisors, I can state that every time I go to Tiffany asking her to help with some work, she welcomes the request, accepts to do the work with a smile, gets the job done as quickly as possible, and most importantly, conveys a feeling that she is happy to do that job. This indicates to me that she loves what she is doing,” a nominator wrote. “Moreover, she is efficient, logical in her approach to any work, focused, and task-driven. She is highly detailed-oriented, student-centered and a professional. She loves to help all who are in her circle.” Another noted, “Her help in almost every aspect of my and my colleague’s daily work tasks cannot be overestimated. She is always willing and capable to help, no matter how much time and effort is required. Her ability to think through all little details makes her truly invaluable for management of any function.”

Dan Kall, law registrar in the College of Law. He joined the UT staff in 1994. He received a bachelor of science degree in computer science and a master of arts degree in liberal studies from the University in 1995 and 2016, respectively.

“Dan goes above and beyond in answering questions, finding solutions, and maintaining a sense of calm during stressful situations, including finals and class scheduling. Dan not only partners with other staff members and faculty, but he provides students with a ‘compass’ to guide us through our academic pursuits. Dan never fails to answers calls and emails, even on breaks and weekends, to make sure that students feel supported,” one nominator wrote. “Dan inspires those around him to strive for their own personal best and models that through his own actions. Dan is professional, kind, empathetic and knowledgeable. For many of us, he has served as a mentor and counselor when we are trying to navigate through a difficult time with courts’ schedules and final grades.” “Dan Kall demonstrates personal commitment to the College of Law by his dedication on weekends, holidays and evenings to keep students up to date on grade postings. He is always quick to respond to any and all concerns that students have,” another noted.

Renee Mullins, custodial worker in the Savage & Associates Business Complex. She has worked at the University since 2015.

“Renee has great ideas to motivate and help her coworkers. If there is an issue in the building, like a needed repair or if you see a better way to achieve quality work, she alerts her manager. Renee has really single-handedly turned this high-profile building into one the students, professors and employees can be proud of,” a nominator wrote. “Renee has a notebook with all events and activities in her building so she does not forget a detail. All her closets are neat and tidy. Even her trash container is clean; she stated that she keeps it clean because students and guests see it in the hall and it reflects on her cleaning. She comes in early, stays late, works through lunch if needed all because she loves The University of Toledo.”

Lucy Salazar, custodial worker in the Collier Building on Health Science Campus. She started working at the University in 2010.

“Her responsibilities include the first floor which encompasses our lobby, large lecture halls, restrooms and other first-floor classrooms. I am so pleased to be able to nominate Lucy because she goes above and beyond her duties, and is a shining example of someone who takes great pride in her work, strives to do her best, and understands the importance of her role, realizing that the first impression visitors may have of our campus is when they enter the Collier Building,” a nominator wrote. “Lucy acknowledges everyone she sees. She is warm and kind and has a smile that resonates warmth and caring. She understands the importance of her work and takes it to heart. I wish there were more employees like Lucy in every department so our students, patients, staff and faculty could witness someone who genuinely cares about the work she does.”

Jeannie Stambaugh, secretary in the Department of Economics. She joined the UT staff in 1989. She received an associate’s degree in secretarial technology from the University in 1980.

“Jeannie is the heart and soul of the Economics Department, and she has been for decades. Jeannie is the main reason for the collegiality within the department. She radiates positive energy and enthusiasm every day. Her interactions with everyone, always, are unequivocally friendly and helpful. Jeannie has established a rapport with all 12 faculty in the department and with all the students. Jeannie demonstrates extraordinary personal commitment because this is not a job to her; we are her second family,” a nominator wrote. “She comes in every day with her long list of tasks to do and then manages to complete the tasks while being interrupted every 15 minutes by a faculty member, student, delivery, phone call, and she somehow gets it all done. Our department would literally come to a standstill without her. Jeannie goes so far beyond her ever-expanding responsibilities in her care and concern for everyone who enters her office.”

President Sharon L. Gaber, left, posed with the 2018 Outstanding Staff Award recipients, from left, Lucy Salazar, Tiffany Akeman, Jeannie Stambaugh, Renee Mullins and Dan Kall.

Football legend, technology expert to speak at UT commencement ceremonies

Chuck Ealey and Dr. Helen Sun will return to The University of Toledo to give addresses during spring commencement ceremonies Saturday, May 5, in the Glass Bowl.

Ealey, the football star and businessman, will speak at the undergraduate ceremony at 10 a.m. Sun, a technology strategist known for transforming companies, will come out for the graduate commencement at 3 p.m.

There are 3,094 candidates for degrees from the colleges of Arts and Letters; Business and Innovation; Judith Herb College of Education; Engineering; Health and Human Services; Graduate Studies; Natural Sciences and Mathematics; Nursing; Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences; and University College. There are 987 candidates for doctoral, education specialist and master’s degrees, as well as graduate certificates, and 2,107 for bachelor’s and associate’s degrees.

The public ceremonies can be viewed live at utoledo.edu/video.

Ealey

UT will award Ealey an honorary doctor of humane letters.

“It is amazing, wonderful and humbling to have the opportunity to speak to the 2018 graduates of The University of Toledo,” Ealey said. “What I want to share is what I have learned — and am still learning — after I graduated. It’s about a legacy dream that can come true.”

He made dreams a reality as the UT quarterback who became a legend leading the Rockets to 35 victories in three seasons and as a trailblazer for African-American QBs in the Canadian Football League.

After finishing 18-0 in high school in Portsmouth, Ohio, Ealey received a football scholarship to the University. While earning a business degree in economics, he earned some nicknames for his exploits on the field: Mr. Cool, The Wizard of Oohs and Aahs. With Ealey at quarterback, Toledo went 35-0 from 1969 to 1971. He racked up 5,903 yards in total offense and 54 touchdowns while leading the Rockets to final Associated Press rankings of No. 20 in 1969, No. 12 in 1970, and No. 14 in 1971, finishing eighth in the Heisman Trophy voting his senior year.

Despite the eye-popping numbers, Ealey was passed over as a quarterback in the 1972 NFL draft. Although offered other positions, he was committed to becoming a professional quarterback and elected to go to the Canadian Football League. As a rookie, he led the Hamilton Tiger-Cats to the Grey Cup Championship in 1972 and was named Most Valuable Player. During his seven years in the CFL, he also played for the Toronto Argonauts and the Winnipeg Blue Bombers.

After hanging up his helmet, Ealey was a certified financial planner with Investors Group for 30 years. He recently stepped out of his role as regional director to do more client and corporate coaching. The 1972 UT alumnus also inspires through the Chuck Ealey Foundation, which helps people discover and embrace their undefeated spirit to better themselves and their community.

Sun

Sun, chief technology officer of architecture, engineering and data management at JPMorgan Chase & Co. in Chicago, received a PhD in educational technology from UT in 2001. She is an expert in revolutionizing businesses through innovative solutions, including artificial intelligence, cloud, analytics and architecture.

“I’m very excited to be coming back to campus and reflect on how my IT career took shape during the years I attended UT,” said Sun, who developed websites while in graduate school.

“I’ll wrap my speech around three personal experiences: How I started a career in technology — find where your passion lies; how my seemingly diverse career path has taken me to where I am — take risks and never let fear of failure deter you away from opportunities; and who my true hero is throughout these years — don’t let what others do to you change who you are,” she said.

Prior to joining JPMorgan Chase & Co., Sun was vice president for cloud computing, information and architecture at Motorola Solutions Inc. She has held senior leadership positions at some of the world’s most recognizable companies, including Harbor Capitol Advisors, NewEdge Group, Oracle Corp. and Salesforce.com Inc.

At Oracle, Sun became the first woman to achieve Oracle Enterprise Architect status and was honored as Oracle Enterprise Architect of the Year in 2011. In 2016, the Chicago Business Journal named her one of 50 honorees for its Women of Influence Awards.

She is the co-author of “Oracle Big Data Handbook,” “Pro Salesforce Analytics Cloud: A Guide to Wave Platform, Builder and Explorer” and “Master Competitive Analytics With Oracle Endeca Information Discovery.” Sun is a frequent speaker at major conferences and symposia; she gave the keynote address at the Open Group Big Data Conference in 2012 in Barcelona, Spain.

In addition to her passion serving as a mentor for women, Sun was a member of the UT Business Advisory Board from 2012 to 2016. She is co-chair of the Computer Science Advisory Board at Bowling Green State University.

Those planning to attend commencement are advised to use the west entrance off Secor Road and the south entrance off Dorr Street to avoid congestion on West Bancroft Street.

The College of Law will hold its commencement Sunday, May 6, at 1 p.m. in the Thompson Student Union Auditorium.

And the College of Medicine and Life Sciences’ graduation ceremony will take place Friday, May 25, at 2 p.m. in Stranahan Theater, 4645 Heatherdowns Blvd. in Toledo.

University recognizes faculty, staff for advising, research, teaching, outreach work

UT outstanding advisors, researchers and teachers, and recipients of the Edith Rathbun Award for Outreach and Engagement, were recognized last week.

Recipients of the Outstanding Advisor Award were:

Winners of the Outstanding Adviser Award were Dr. Jerry Van Hoy and Amanda Seabolt.

Amanda Seabolt, academic advisor in the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics. The UT alumna received a bachelor of science degree in biology, a master of public health degree, a master of science degree in nursing, and a graduate certificate in gerontological practice. She will graduate with a doctor of philosophy in curriculum and instruction from the University next month. Seabolt started advising students in 2015, the same year she received one of UT’s Outstanding Staff Awards.

“She is always giving students opportunities, whether it be in getting a new job, joining an organization, or participating in research,” one nominator wrote. “She is always pushing students to do their best.” “She shows great knowledge through her own personal experience and continued education. She never stops learning,” another nominator wrote. “If she doesn’t know something, she doesn’t stop looking until she finds the answer. She is always working for the student. She has been one of the most influential people during my time at the University.”

Dr. Jerry Van Hoy, associate professor of sociology in the College of Arts and Letters. He is co-director of the Program in Law and Social Thought and director of the Master of Liberal Studies Program. Van Hoy joined the University in 2000 and received one of UT’s Outstanding Teacher Awards in 2013.

“He flips the notion that advising is purely transactional on its head by listening to students’ needs and concerns. He helps students develop academic plans that work for them, addressing weaknesses and creating pathways to not only graduation, but to a life after college that students are excited about,” a nominator wrote. Another noted, “As a recent graduate, I faced some distressing events during my capstone project. Dr. Van Hoy provided objective feedback to let me know the problem wasn’t unusual, the troubling issues were not caused by me, and that they were not insurmountable. His advice was calming and reassuring. He was sensitive, diplomatic when needed, and direct as required.”

Recipients of the Outstanding Research and Scholarship Award were:

Receiving Outstanding Research and Scholarship Awards were, from left, Dr. Vijay Devabhaktuni, Dr. Yanfa Yan and Nicole Buonocore Porter.

Dr. Vijay Devabhaktuni
, professor of electrical engineering and computer science in the College of Engineering. He is executive director of emerging technologies and special advisor to the UT vice president, chief information officer and chief technology officer. Devabhaktuni joined the faculty as an associate professor in 2008.

He is a renowned expert in computer-aided design, machine learning, modeling, optimization and simulation as applied to electromagnetics, big data, biomedical engineering, cyber security, energy efficiency, virtual reality, wireless sensor networking, image and signal processing, and more. Since 2009, the National Science Foundation has supported his work. While at UT, he has received about $2 million in funding from more than 30 external grants and has published more than 80 papers. According to Google Scholar, Devebhaktuni’s work has been cited 3,200 times since 2013.

Nicole Buonocore Porter, professor of law in the College of Law. She joined the faculty as an assistant professor in 2007.

Porter is a nationally recognized scholar on the employment rights of women and individuals with disabilities. She is the author of a disability law casebook, published by a leading legal academic publisher, and is the co-editor of a forthcoming book titled “Feminist Judgments: Employment Discrimination Opinions Rewritten.” Her published articles address the persistent pay gap between men and women, discrimination against workers with caregiving responsibilities, and the employment rights of individuals with disabilities. Her work has been cited more than any other faculty member in the UT College of Law, and she is frequently invited to speak at symposia and national conferences. In addition, Porter was invited to join the Labor Law Group, a prestigious organization that produces scholarship on labor and employment law.

Dr. Yanfa Yan, professor of physics in the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics. He joined the UT faculty in 2011.

For two decades, Yan has been researching photovoltaics, solar fuels and energy storage techniques using a combination of theory, material synthesis, device fabrication, and material and device characterization. He has written or co-written more than 350 articles and has given more than 50 invited talks. According to Google Scholar, Yan’s work has been cited 16,868 times. His work has been funded with more than $5 million from the National Science Foundation, Department of Energy, Office of Naval Research and private industry.

Recipients of the Edith Rathbun Award for Outreach and Engagement were:

Recipients of the Edith Rathbun Award for Outreach and Engagement were Dr. Susan Batten and Kenneth Kilbert.

Dr. Susan Batten
, professor in the College of Nursing. She joined the University in 1995.

Batten coordinates patient intake for the UT Community Care Clinic at Cedar Creek Church, provides care during Labre Traveling Clinic in south and east Toledo, and for migrant workers at their resident camps in northwest Ohio. She also has mentored nursing, medical and pharmacy students during annual medical missions to Guatemala, Honduras and Haiti. Batten has worked with more than 1,000 UT students with her community outreach and service projects. Their work has impacted more than 4,000 chronic disease patients in northwest Ohio, 500 immigrant workers and their families in rural Ohio, and more than 40,000 patients in Honduras, Guatemala and Haiti.

Kenneth Kilbert, professor and director of the Legal Institute of the Great Lakes in the College of Law. He joined the University in 2006.

A scholar of environmental law, Kilbert’s work focuses on water issues affecting the Great Lakes region. Since 2006, he has planned UT’s annual Great Lakes Water Conference, which addresses legal and policy issues important to the region and its water resources. Each year, the conference draws approximately 300 guests and garners extensive media coverage. In addition, Kilbert has received multiple grants to study harmful algal blooms in Lake Erie. His scholarly work increases awareness, promotes best practices, and suggests legal solutions to address the algal bloom problem.

Recipients of the Outstanding Teacher Award were:

Kara Bruce, professor in the College of Law. She joined the faculty in 2010.

“Professor Bruce exemplifies everything a professor should be — teacher, mentor, friend,” a nominator wrote. “Professor Bruce strives to engage her students while teaching difficult, sometimes less-interesting classes. She provides practical examples, makes jokes, and she goes out of her way (sometimes at the expense of getting behind schedule) to make sure we all understand what she is teaching. Honestly, I wish I could take Professor Bruce for every class in law school.” “Professor Bruce is excellent at taking complicated and challenging material and making it manageable for her students. She presents the material in a way that acknowledges the difficultly without making it seem daunting,” another wrote. “Not only is she passionate about students passing her class, she is passionate about making her students pass the bar.”

Dr. Edward Cancio, associate professor of special education in the Judith Herb College of Education. He came to UT in 2007.

“Dr. Cancio has been the most knowledgeable and inspiring professor I have had in my four years at UT. Every week Dr. Cancio showed the same passion for the subject that he taught and brought out the best from my classmates and I. It is easy to see from his lectures, published articles, and just speaking to him that Dr. Cancio is an expert in his field and was happy to pass his knowledge on special education to the class,” one nominator wrote. “Dr. Cancio’s class focused on teaching students with emotional behavioral disorder, which is one of the most intimidating sections of special education. After taking his class, I know that I am more than prepared to go into this field.”

Elyce Ervin, senior lecturer in the School of Exercise and Rehabilitation Sciences in the College of Health and Human Services. She has been teaching at the University since 1999.

“I had Elyce Ervin for Anatomy and Physiology, which has never been so easily comprehendible than it was in her class. She provided mini-activities every other class that helped us to understand the material. She also provided great lecture notes that were organized and easy to keep up with. The notes were fill-in, which helped people pay attention in her class. She would always ask if anyone had any questions in between every slide to ensure we were understanding the material,” one nominator wrote. “The one thing that makes Elyce Ervin stick out is how she is continuing to have an impact on me. She is without a doubt one of the best people I have met in my life.”

Dr. Jackie Layng, professor of communication in the College of Arts and Letters. She has taught at the University since 1997.

“Dr. Layng has by far been the most knowledgeable and personable professor I have had at UT. Her classes always push me to do my best work and achieve professional-level skills. Many times her class assignments seem intimidating at first, but Dr. Layng is always available to guide students throughout the process,” a nominator wrote. Another noted, “Selfless, dedicated, inspiring, caring: If you asked me to list all of the amazing things about Jackie, I think it’d be impossible because she’s had such a profound impact on my life. She genuinely cares about her students. Her constant words of encouragement, honest critiques, and passion for her career genuinely keep me going, and I couldn’t have asked for a better mentor.”

Dr. Kim E. Nielsen, professor of history, disability studies, and women’s and gender studies in the College of Arts and Letters. She joined the faculty in 2012.

“Dr. Nielsen creates a classroom atmosphere that makes all of her students feel comfortable to share stories, ideas and opinions. She listens to every student and encourages all of her students to have a voice,” a nominator wrote. Another noted, “Dr. Nielsen goes out of her way to make sure every student succeeds. Her sense of humor makes every class intriguing and makes me want to learn more. I wasn’t much of a history buff until taking classes with her and hearing her passionate views. Dr. Nielsen is always available when you need her. She always comes to class with a smiling face even considering the boatload of other work she has to do. I wish I could have her for more classes.”

John J. Schlageter III, senior lecturer in the Paralegal Studies Program housed in the School of Social Justice in the College of Health and Human Services. He is a graduate of the UT College of Law and has been teaching at the University since 1998.

“He is truly the best professor that I had throughout my college career — always willing to listen, help in any way he can, and truly do everything in his power to help you begin your career in law,” one nominator wrote. Another noted, “Professor Schlageter goes above and beyond to help the students achieve great success in the paralegal classes. He always offers support, help and resources. He strives hard to make sure all students find a good quality internship. He always checks in on students and always offers support.” Another wrote, “He listens to every concern and teaches with such a passion. You can tell John loves what he does. He has helped myself and many others land jobs.”

Taking home Outstanding Teacher Awards were, from left, Elyce Ervin, Dr. Jackie Layng, John J. Schlageter III, Dr. Kim E. Nielsen, Kara Bruce and Dr. Edward Cancio.

Distinguished University Professors also were recognized at the ceremony:

Dr. Abdollah Afjeh of the Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering in the College of Engineering;

Dr. Paul Hong of the Department of Information Operations and Technology Management in the College of Business and Innovation; and

Joseph Slater of the College of Law.

Read more about them here.

And Distinguished University Lecturers were honored:

Amy O’Donnell of the Department of Management in the College of Business and Innovation;

Sherry Tripepi of the School of Social Justice in the College of Health and Human Services; and

Sara Yaklin of the Department of English in the College of Arts and Letters.

Read more about them here.

UT to host town hall on free speech April 24

For the second time in a month, The University of Toledo is hosting a town hall meeting to give students the opportunity to discuss free speech rights and the University’s role in maintaining and protecting those rights.

The event will be Tuesday, April 24, from 3 to 4 p.m. in the Thompson Student Union Ingman Room.

Dr. Sam Nelson, associate professor and chair of the UT Department of Political Science and Public Administration, will serve as moderator. Nelson is the author of “Beyond the First Amendment: The Politics of Free Speech and Pluralism.”

Lee Strang, UT constitutional law scholar and John W. Stoepler Professor of Law and Values, will provide an overview about constitutional law and free speech, as well as field questions.

“Students asked us to continue this important dialogue on the topic of free speech after a controversial banner was hung in the Thompson Student Union, and we encourage their high level of civil discourse,” said Dr. Phillip “Flapp” Cockrell, vice president for student affairs.

“I am proud of the passionate, respectful way our students are engaged on campus,” Dr. Willie McKether, vice president of diversity and inclusion and vice provost, said.

Law student wins two national writing competitions for health law research

Mark Fadel, a student in the College of Law pursuing the joint doctor of medicine/juris doctor, won first place in both the American College of Legal Medicine and the Epstein Becker Green Health Law writing competitions.

Fadel was named the Hirsh Award winner in the American College of Legal Medicine (ACLM) Student Writing Competition.

Fadel

The ACLM is the preeminent national organization for law and medicine. As the first-place winner, Fadel presented his research for “360 Years of Measles: Limiting Liberty Now for a Healthier Future” at the ACLM 2018 Annual Meeting in Charleston, S.C.

“State-based school immunization laws form the bedrock of compulsory vaccination efforts in the United States,” Fadel said. “However, a spectrum of these mandates permitting exemptions exists and has been shown to contribute to measles incidence. My goal in this research is to show how the permissiveness of these laws drives medical outcomes, and how different laws produce different population health statistics during outbreaks.”

Fadel also won first place in the Epstein Becker Green Health Law Writing Competition for a different paper, “Insurance Practices and Disparities in Access to Assisted Reproductive Technologies.”

His second article focused on variation in state laws related to insurance coverage for infertility treatments and the disparities between groups able to access such procedures.

“Mark’s work exemplifies the power of our joint-degree curriculum,” said Associate Professor Elizabeth McCuskey, who co-directs the University’s juris doctor/ doctor of medicine and juris doctor/master of public health joint degree programs. “His legal education informs his perspective on health care, and his medical education informs his perspective on law as a health-care intervention.

“Interdisciplinary work is essential to health-care regulation and reform, and Mark is poised to be among the next generation of health-care leaders. I am so pleased that Mark’s work has attracted national attention from top practitioners in both fields. It is well-deserved.”

Fadel recently was accepted to present his insurance disparities research at the 41st Annual Health Law Professors Conference in Cleveland in June. His research paper also was accepted for publication in the Florida Coastal Law Review this summer.

MacArthur Foundation Safety and Justice Challenge featured as part of Distinguished Lecture Series

The University of Toledo will host Dr. Laurie Garduque, director of justice reform with the MacArthur Foundation, Monday, April 16, at 6 p.m. in Doermann Theatre.

She will discuss the role of philanthropy in social change through this unique and powerful program. 

A panel discussion and question-and-answer session will follow her remarks. Panelists will be Mayor Wade Kapszukiewicz and representatives of the Lucas County Safety and Justice Challenge Team, Commissioner Carol Contrada and Common Pleas Court Judge Gene Zmuda.

“We are thrilled to bring Dr. Garduque to campus. Her program represents one of the finest examples of social change achieved through evidence-based practices,” said Dr. Heidi Appel, dean of the Jesup Scott Honors College. “We’re also very proud to showcase the highly successful local initiative as part of the event. The evening will be a memorable demonstration of how national and local partners can affect meaningful change.”

The Safety and Justice Challenge is providing support to local leaders from across the country who are determined to tackle one of the greatest drivers of over-incarceration in America — the misuse and overuse of jails.

The Safety and Justice Challenge elicited an overwhelming response. A total of 191 applications were submitted from jurisdictions spanning 45 states and territories. In 2015, 20 were selected to participate in the Challenge Network to develop comprehensive plans for creating fairer, more effective justice systems. In 2017, an additional 20 jurisdictions were selected to join in the Safety and Justice Network through the Challenge Innovation Fund.

Within the Challenge Network, 18 implementation sites are receiving funding and expert technical assistance to implement reforms to make local justice systems fairer and more effective. The 20 selected sites are receiving short-term support to design and test a single innovative reform program or project.

The Challenge Network sites represent 34 counties, four cities and two statewide systems. They are geographically distributed throughout the country and have a diverse jail capacity size, ranging from 140 beds in Campbell County, Tennessee, to as many as 21,811 beds in Los Angeles County. Collectively, the Challenge Network holds a jail capacity of approximately 130,000 and accounts for 16 percent of the total confined jail population.

Lucas County, Ohio, is in the process of comprehensive criminal justice reform, including pretrial risk assessment, enhancing community-based behavioral health and drug-dependency diversion resources, and expanding re-entry-based programming. To continue building upon these reform efforts, Lucas County was awarded $1.75 million from the Safety and Justice Challenge in 2016 to invest in effective strategies to further reduce the average daily jail population over the next two years while addressing racial and ethnic disparity.

Working with law enforcement personnel, Lucas County will launch a series of pre-arrest educational and training programs addressing implicit bias, procedural justice and crisis de-escalation, while providing meaningful jail alternatives, including on-demand access to behavioral health resources.

To further address racial disparity and underserved populations, pretrial diversion programs will be expanded and enhanced. Lucas County also will establish a population review team comprised of a variety of stakeholders who will conduct weekly case-by-case assessments of the entire pretrial population to identify and recommend individuals who are suitable for release or expedited case resolution. In addition, judges and court personnel will manage pretrial risk through tiered supervision options and community-based resources such as GPS electronic monitoring, and will implement coordinated probation protocols throughout all county jurisdictions.

The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation supports creative people, effective institutions and influential networks building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. MacArthur is placing a few big bets that truly significant progress is possible on some of the world’s most pressing social challenges, including over-incarceration, global climate change, nuclear risk, and significantly increasing financial capital for the social sector. In addition to the MacArthur Fellows Program, the foundation continues its historic commitments to the role of journalism in a responsible and responsive democracy, as well as the strength and vitality of its headquarters city, Chicago.

MacArthur is one of the nation’s largest independent foundations. Organizations supported by the foundation work in about 50 countries. In addition to Chicago, MacArthur has offices in India, Mexico and Nigeria.

Garduque joined the MacArthur Foundation in 1991 after serving as director of the National Forum on the Future of Children and Families, a joint project of the National Research Council and the Institute of Medicine. From 1984 to 1987, she was the director of governmental and professional liaison for the American Educational Research Association in Washington, D.C. This position followed the year she spent, from 1983 to 1984, as a Congressional Science Fellow in the U.S. Senate. From 1980 to 1985, Garduque held a faculty position as an assistant professor of human development at Pennsylvania State University.

She previously served on the boards of the American Psychiatric Association Foundation; Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in Philanthropy; Grantmakers for Children Youth and Families; and the Youth Transition Funders Group Juvenile Justice Working Group, as well as on the federal Center for Mental Health Services National Advisory Council, under Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. She currently serves on the Federal Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

Garduque received her bachelor’s degree in psychology and her PhD in educational psychology from the University of California at Los Angeles.

Guests are invited to stay for a reception following the lecture, which is co-sponsored by The University of Toledo College of Law.

The event marks the third of this year’s Jesup Scott Honors College Distinguished Lecture Series.

Tickets are free to students and the public by visiting utoledo.edu/honorslecture.

For more information, contact the Jesup Scott Honors College at honors@utoledo.edu or 419.530.6030.