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UT faculty recognized for tenure and promotion

Sixty-four University of Toledo faculty members were honored in a special 2018-19 tenure and promotion celebration Sept. 28 in Carlson Library. Last year, 53 faculty members earned tenure and promotion.

Each honoree was asked to select a book that was instrumental to his or her success, and these books — each containing a bookplate commemorating the honoree’s milestone — are now housed in the library.

“We began this tradition when I joined UT because we believe recognizing faculty helps to foster excellence in research and academics, and helps fuel innovation in all fields of study,” said President Sharon L. Gaber.

“Faculty success, together with student success, are two of the highest priorities of the University and of the Office of the Provost,” said Provost Andrew Hsu. “We have implemented a number of new programs to enhance faculty success since President Gaber joined The University of Toledo. And while the large number of faculty honorees this year demonstrates the progress that we have made in faculty success, the credit goes to the hard work and dedication of our faculty.”

UT faculty receiving tenure are Dr. Hossein Elgafy and Dr. Xin Wang, College of Medicine and Life Sciences.

Appointed as professor with tenure are Dr. Anne Balazs, College of Business and Innovation, and Dr. Raymond Witte, Judith Herb College of Education. And appointed as associate professor with tenure is Dr. Denise Bartell, Jesup Scott Honors College.

Faculty members who were promoted to professor are Dr. Tomer Avidor-Reiss, Dr. Maria Diakonova, Dr. Timothy Mueser and Dr. Michael Weintraub, College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics; Dr. Amanda Bryant-Friedrich and Dr. Frederick Williams, College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences; Dr. Florian Feucht and Dr. Tod Shockey, Judith Herb College of Education; Dr. Bashar Gammoh and Dr. Margaret Hopkins, College of Business and Innovation; Dr. Tavis Glassman and Dr. Sheryl Milz, College of Health and Human Services; Dr. Edmund Lingan, Dr. Mysoon Rizk, Dr. Sujata Shetty and Dr. Jami Taylor, College of Arts and Letters; Elizabeth McCuskey and Evan Zoldan, College of Law; Dr. Azedine Medhkour, Dr. Theodor Rais, Dr. Tallat Rizk and Dr. David Sohn, College of Medicine and Life Sciences; and Dr. Devinder Kaur, Dr. Scott Molitor, Dr. Youngwoo Seo, Dr. Gursel Serpen, Dr. Chunhua Sheng, Dr. Sridhar Viamajala and Dr. Hongyan Zhang, College of Engineering.

Promoted to professor with tenure are Dr. Guillermo Vazquez and Dr. Hongyan Li, College of Medicine and Life Sciences.

Faculty members who received tenure and promotion to associate professor include Dr. Wissam AbouAlaiwi, College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences; Dr. Halim Ayan and Dr. Eda Yildirim-Ayan, College of Engineering; Dr. Liat Ben-Moshe, Daniel Hernandez, Dr. Jason Levine, Dr. Thor Mednick and Dr. Daniel Thobias, College of Arts and Letters; Dr. Joseph Cooper and Dr. Kainan Wang, College of Business and Innovation; Dr. Rafael Garcia-Mata, College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics; Dr. Mouhammad Jumaa, Dr. Krishna Reddy and Dr. Diana Shvydka, College of Medicine and Life Sciences; and Dr. Aravindhan Natarajan, College of Health and Human Services.

Faculty promoted to associate professor are Dr. Daniel Gehling, Dr. Claudiu Georgescu, Dr. Bryan Hinch, Dr. Kimberly Jenkins, Dr. Jeremy Laukka, Dr. Terrence Lewis, Dr. Jiayong Liu, Dr. Sumon Nandi and Dr. Syed Zaidi, College of Medicine and Life Sciences; and Dr. Randall Vesely, Judith Herb College of Education.

Faculty who received renewal of their titles with tenure are Michelle Cavalieri and Bryan Lammon, College of Law.

And Dr. George Darah was promoted to clinical associate professor in the College of Medicine and Life Sciences.

“We wish each of these individuals continued success at the University, and ask our campus community to join us in congratulating them,” Hsu said.

Faculty members posed for a photo with President Sharon L. Gaber and Provost Andrew Hsu during the tenure and promotion celebration held last month in Carlson Library.

Scholar to discuss mass incarceration epidemic

Dr. John F. Pfaff, professor of law at Fordham University, will visit The University of Toledo this week to give two talks on prison reform.

He is the author of the 2017 book, “Locked In: The True Causes of Mass Incarceration and How to Achieve Real Reform.”

Pfaff

“Dr. Pfaff’s research shows that only by reducing the power and discretion of public prosecutors and reducing the length of prison sentences for violent offenses will we see any significant reduction in prison populations,” said Dr. Renee Heberle, UT professor of political science and co-director of the UT Law and Social Thought Program.

Pfaff spent 15 years researching imprisonment data to try to understand the 40-year boom in U.S. incarceration rates.

“The statistics are as simple as they are shocking: The United States is home to 5 percent of the world’s population but 25 percent of its prisoners,” he wrote in the introduction to “Locked In.”

“Mass incarceration is one of the biggest social problems the United States faces today; our sprawling prison system imposes staggering economic, social, political and racial costs,” he wrote.

On Tuesday, Oct. 16, Pfaff will give a talk titled “Moving Past the Standard Story: Rethinking the Causes of Mass Incarceration” at 7 p.m. in the Driscoll Alumni Center Auditorium.

And on Wednesday, Oct. 17, Pfaff will discuss “Sentencing Violent Offenders: Rethinking How We Confront Mass Incarceration” at 11:50 a.m. in Law Center Room 1002.

“Professor Pfaff will discuss his research and recent book, which illuminates the previously underappreciated roles prosecutorial discretion and sentencing policy have played in driving up prison populations,” said Dr. Renee Heberle, UT professor of political science and co-director of the UT Law and Social Thought Program.

“While it is common to focus on recidivism rates, crime rates and nonviolent drug offenders as causes for mass incarceration, Dr. Pfaff’s careful empirical approach makes very clear that only limiting prosecutorial power and significantly reducing the length of sentences will ultimately render mass incarceration obsolete,” she said.

The free, public events are sponsored by the UT College of Law and the UT Law and Social Thought Program.

For more information, contact Heberle at renee.heberle@utoledo.edu.

Homecoming Gala to recognize Gold, Blue T, Young Alum award recipients

The University of Toledo Alumni Association will honor the winners of its most prestigious honors: the Gold T, Blue T and Edward H. Schmidt Outstanding Young Alum Award.

These three recipients will be recognized — along with distinguished alumni from each UT college — at the Homecoming Gala Friday, Oct. 5, at 6 p.m. in the Thompson Student Union Auditorium.

Tickets for the gala are $30 per person, $10 for children. To make a reservation, visit toledoalumni.org or contact the UT Alumni Office at 419.530.ALUM (2586).

Montgomery

The Gold T is presented to a UT graduate in recognition of outstanding achievement in his or her field of endeavor while providing leadership and noteworthy service to the community.

The 2018 recipient is Betty Montgomery. She received a law degree from the University in 1976 and began blazing trails. In 1995, Montgomery became the first woman to serve as attorney general in the state of Ohio. She served a four-year term and was re-elected to another four-year term. In 2003, she ran for auditor of the state of Ohio. Again she was a trendsetter, becoming the first woman to hold that four-year title in the more than 200-year history of the Buckeye State.

Before that, Montgomery spent seven years as a state senator for District 2, covering Ottawa, Wood and parts of Lucas and Erie counties. She also served as Wood County’s prosecuting attorney for eight years, during which time she was the only woman prosecuting attorney in Ohio.

Wakefield

The Blue T is presented to a UT Alumni Association member and University graduate who has made outstanding contributions to the progress and development of the Alumni Association and his or her alma mater.

Dr. Tom Wakefield is the 2018 recipient. He received an undergraduate degree in premed in 1970 and a medical degree from the former Medical College of Ohio in 1973.

Wakefield is the James C. Stanley Professor of Surgery, section head of vascular surgery and director of the Frankel Cardiovascular Center at the University of Michigan. He has received nearly $26 million in funded grants for vascular research. Wakefield is passionate about his alma mater. He served as president of the Alumni Association during the 2014-15 school year and is a major financial supporter of the College of Medicine and Life Sciences; the Athletics Department; the Alumni Association; and the Catharine S. Eberly Center for Women.

Ladd

The Edward H. Schmidt Outstanding Young Alum Award is presented to a University graduate who is 40 years or younger in recognition of outstanding achievement in her or his field of endeavor, while providing leadership and noteworthy service to the Alumni Association, University or community. This award is named in memory of the 1942 alumnus and a longtime supporter of the University and its Alumni Association.

The 2018 recipient is Dr. Mallory Ladd, who earned a bachelor’s degree from the College of Arts and Sciences and the Jesup Scott Honors College in 2011.
A recent graduate of the University of Tennessee’s PhD program, Ladd has been hired by the federally funded Center for Naval Analysis in Washington, D.C. She is an internationally recognized scientist who has developed mass spectrometry tools to measure the chemistry of soils in the Artic, which is viewed as a tipping-point area for climate change. Ladd also has served as a panelist at the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting in Germany.

For more information, contact Dan Saevig, UT associate vice president of alumni engagement, at 419.530.4008.

Islamic family law in United States topic of Cannon Lecture

Dr. Asifa Quraishi-Landes, professor of law at the University of Wisconsin Law School, will present the annual Cannon Lecture at The University of Toledo College of Law Thursday, Sept. 27, at noon in the Law Center McQuade Auditorium.

The title of her talk is “Islamic Family Law in the United States: Islamophobia, American Secularism, and American Muslims.”

Quraishi

As state court judges wrestle with how and whether to accommodate religious-based claims in divorce litigation, “anti-Sharia” law bills have proliferated in states across the country. Quraishi-Landes will summarize the legal landscape of Islamic family law cases in the U.S. over the years and will discuss what the future might mean for American secularism and for American Muslims living here.

Quraishi-Landes is a nationally known expert on Islamic and U.S. constitutional law, with a focus on modern Islamic constitutional theory. She teaches in the areas of constitutional law and Islamic law.

She is president of the National Association of Muslim Lawyers and serves on the governing board of the Association of America Law Schools Section on Islamic Law. She is working on a book manuscript, “Islamic Reconstitutionalism,” in which she proposes a new model of Islamic constitutionalism for today’s Muslim-majority countries.

Quraishi-Landes is a 2009 Carnegie Scholar and 2012 Guggenheim Fellow. Previously, she served as a public delegate on the U.S. Delegation to the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women; president and board member of KARAMAH: Muslim Women Lawyers for Human Rights; fellow with the Institute for Social Policy and Understanding; and advisor to the Pew Task Force on Religion and Public Life.

Quraishi-Landes received a bachelor of arts degree from the University of California-Berkeley, a juris doctor from the University of California-Davis, a doctor of juridical science from Harvard Law School, and a master of laws degree from Columbia Law School.

“In an increasingly pluralistic society, our legal institutions have sometimes stumbled in handling diverse religious traditions,” said Geoffrey Rapp, associate dean for academic affairs in the UT College of Law. “This year’s Cannon Lecturer, Professor Quraishi-Landes, will offer insights into the treatment of Islamic family law in American courts.”

This free, public event is part of the Cannon Lecture Series that was established in 1980 to honor former Toledo attorney Joseph A. Cannon. The series hosts nationally known individuals who explore both the humanistic dimensions and limitations of the legal system.

For more information, visit utoledo.edu/law/events/cannon-lecture.html.

University to host naturalization ceremony for Constitution Day

Nearly 70 people will become U.S. citizens during a naturalization ceremony Monday, Sept. 17, at 11 a.m. in the Law Center McQuade Auditorium on UT’s Main Campus.

Judge Jack Zouhary of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Ohio will preside over the ceremony, which will celebrate Constitution Day at the University.

“Students, faculty and staff should plan to attend this very moving ceremony celebrating United States citizenship,” said Diane Miller, associate vice president for government relations. “It’s a great reminder of the freedoms we enjoy as citizens of the United States and how that is sought after by people from all over the globe.”

Welcome remarks will be given by UT President Sharon L. Gaber and D. Benjamin Barros, dean of the UT College of Law.

Billy Jeffers, president of the Student Bar Association, will open the court, while Ariel Berger, vice president of the association, will close it.

Andrew Williams, president of Student Government, will read the Pledge of Allegiance.

Guest speakers will be Inma Zanoguera, a graduate student and 2015 UT alumna and former women’s basketball star who won the Sahara Marathon earlier this year, and Benjamin Syroka, a UT law student who clerked for Judge Zouhary.

The UT Concert Chorale will perform “The Star-Spangled Banner” under the direction of Dr. Brad Pierson, assistant professor and director of choral activities in the UT Music Department.

The free, public event is sponsored by the Office of Government Relations and the Center for International Studies and Programs.

For more information on the naturalization ceremony, contact Lisa Byers, executive assistant in the Office of Government Relations, at lisa.byers@utoledo.edu.

‘Executive Power in the Age of Trump’ topic of UT law lecture Aug. 30

Saikrishna B. Prakash, the James Monroe Distinguished Professor of Law and the Paul G. Mahoney Research Professor of Law at the University of Virginia School of Law, will discuss presidential power as part of The University of Toledo College of Law’s Stranahan Lecture series.

His lecture, “Executive Power in the Age of Trump,” will be delivered Thursday, Aug. 30, at noon in the Law Center McQuade Auditorium.

Prakash

Prakash will speak on the modern presidency and its ability to unilaterally alter the law it is supposed to faithfully execute. He will examine why modern executives claim the ability to alter constitutional and statutory law through the alchemy of repeated transgressions of existing law. He will argue this ability has contributed to President Trump’s dominant role in constitutional and statutory interpretation.

“Professor Prakash is at the heart of the debate over one of the pressing issues of our time — the power of the president,” said Lee J. Strang, John W. Stoepler Professor of Law & Values at the UT College of Law. “He is one of the nation’s most influential executive power scholars, and he is an engaging speaker. Professor Prakash’s lecture will focus on the expansion of presidential power and its implications for the future. His informed perspective is sure to provoke debate and conversation.”

The author of more than 60 articles, Prakash is a leading scholar of constitutional law and legal history. His recent publications include “50 States, 50 Attorneys General and 50 Approaches to the Duty to Defend” (Yale Law Journal, 2015), “The Imbecilic Executive” (Virginia Law Review, 2013), “The Sweeping Domestic War Powers of Congress” (Michigan Law Review, 2015), and Imperial From the Beginning: The Constitution of the Original Executive (Yale University Press, 2015).

Prakash teaches constitutional law, foreign relations law and presidential powers. He is a graduate of Stanford University and Yale Law School, and he clerked for Justice Clarence Thomas.

The free, public lecture is part of the Stranahan National Issues Forum and is sponsored by the College of Law and its chapter of the Federalist Society for Law and Public Policy Studies.

For more information, visit utoledo.edu/law/events/stranahan-lecture.html.

Law faculty member wins Fulbright grant to research women’s housing advocacy in Ecuador

Shelley Cavalieri, UT associate professor of law, was awarded a prestigious Fulbright grant to conduct research on women’s housing advocacy in Quito, Ecuador.

She will teach law courses in gender theory, housing and health, and clinical legal education at the Universidad de San Francisco de Quito.

Cavalieri

Gender and housing are crucial issues in Ecuador due to an extreme gender pay gap, rapid urbanization, and the inadequacy of housing. Cavalieri proposes using socio-legal methods to conduct her research — working closely with citizen activists, nongovernmental organizations, local academic experts, and government officials.

“The housing issues that are central to my Fulbright proposal are rooted in the same questions of citizen engagement in and government response to the problems of urban life that form my research at home,” Cavalieri said. “My Toledo experiences will shape my research in Quito, and my time in Ecuador will enrich my work in Toledo.”

Cavalieri teaches property law at the University. She is a leading expert on human trafficking, land reform and land banking. Her research focuses on feminist legal theory and economic, social and cultural rights.

She is a graduate of the University of Virginia, where she received a bachelor of arts degree in bioethics, and the University of California at Berkeley, where she received a law degree. 

“Being selected for a Fulbright is one of the highest honors that an academic can achieve,” said D. Benjamin Barros, dean of the UT College of Law. “During her Fulbright, Professor Cavalieri will be doing important research on the impact of women’s advocacy in improving housing access and quality. She also will be a wonderful ambassador for the College of Law and the University.”

Recipients of Fulbright awards are selected on the basis of academic and professional achievement, as well as record of service and leadership potential in their respective fields.

Cavalieri will spend the 2018-19 academic year in Ecuador. She is one of only a handful of law professors at the University to receive this honor.

The Fulbright Scholar Program offers grants to American faculty, administrators and professionals to teach and conduct research abroad. The program is sponsored by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs and administered by the Center for International Studies and Programs at The University of Toledo.

Law professor awarded visiting fellowship at Princeton University

Lee J. Strang, UT professor of law, recently was awarded a visiting fellowship at Princeton University for the 2018-19 academic year.

As a James Madison Program Fellow, Strang will continue historical and archival research on religion and legal education. 

Strang

While in residence, he will focus on completing his latest book, “The History of Catholic Legal Education: Struggles Over Identity.” The book is believed to be the first comprehensive historical study of Catholic legal education in the United States.

“This fellowship is a tremendous opportunity to learn from excellent scholars while writing my history of Catholic legal education,” Strang said.

He is the John W. Stoepler Professor of Law and Values at the UT College of Law. He teaches in the areas of constitutional law, property law, administrative law, federal courts and appellate practice.

Strang was appointed to the Ohio Advisory Committee of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights in 2016. The following year, he received the UT Outstanding Faculty Research and Scholarship Award. 

He is a leading scholar on constitutional law and interpretation, property law, and religion and the First Amendment. His publications include “How Big Data Increases Originalism’s Methodological Rigor: Using Corpus Linguistics to Recover Original Language Conventions,” which was published in the University of California at Davis Law Review in 2017, and “Originalism’s Promise,” which is forthcoming from Cambridge University Press. He is editing the third edition of a unique multi-volume modular casebook, “Federal Constitutional Law,” for Carolina Academic Press. 

“The award of this prestigious fellowship recognizes both Professor Strang’s scholarly achievements to date and the promise of his scholarship in the future,” said D. Benjamin Barros, dean of the UT College of Law. “Already a nationally recognized expert in constitutional law, this fellowship will allow Professor Strang to work on an important new book on Catholic legal education.”

The James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions is sponsored by the Department of Politics at Princeton University. The program is dedicated to the pursuit of scholarly excellence in the fields of constitutional law and political thought.

Faculty members receive promotion, tenure

A number of faculty members received tenure and promotion for the 2017-18 academic year approved in April by the UT Board of Trustees.

Faculty members who received tenure were:

College of Law
• Michelle Cavalieri
• Bryan Lammon

Faculty members who received tenure and promotion to associate professor were:

College of Arts and Letters
• Daniel Hernandez, Art
• Dr. Thor Mednick, Art
• Dr. Liat Ben-Moshe, Disability Studies
• Dr. Jason Levine, Psychology
• Daniel Thobias, Theatre and Film

College of Business and Innovation
• Dr. Kainan Wang, Finance
• Dr. Joseph Cooper, Management

College of Engineering
• Dr. Halim Ayan, Bioengineering
• Dr. Eda Yildirim-Ayan, Bioengineering

College of Health and Human Services
• Dr. Aravindhan Natarajan, School of Social Justice

College of Medicine and Life Sciences
• Dr. David Heidt, Surgery

College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics
• Dr. Rafael Garcia-Mata, Biological Sciences

College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences
• Dr. Wissam AbouAlaiwi, Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics

Faculty members promoted to professor were:

College of Arts and Letters
• Dr. Mysoon Rizk, Art
• Dr. Sujata Shetty, Geography and Planning
• Dr. Jami Taylor, Political Science and Public Administration
• Dr. Edmund Lingan, Theatre and Film

College of Business and Innovation
• Dr. Margaret Hopkins, Management
• Dr. Bashar Gammoh, Marketing and International Business

College of Engineering
• Dr. Scott Molitor, Bioengineering
• Dr. Sridhar Viamajala, Civil and Environmental Engineering
• Dr. Youngwoo Seo, Civil and Environmental Engineering
• Dr. Devinder Kaur, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
• Dr. Gursel Serpen, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
• Dr. Chunhua Sheng, Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering
• Dr. Hongyan Zhang, Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

College of Health and Human Services
• Dr. Tavis Glassman, School of Population Health
• Dr. Sheryl Milz, School of Population Health

Judith Herb College of Education
• Dr. Tod Shockey, Curriculum and Instruction
• Dr. Florian Feucht, Educational Foundations and Leadership

College of Law
• Elizabeth McCuskey
• Evan Zoldan

College of Medicine and Life Sciences
• Dr. Azedine Medhkour, Neurosurgery

College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics
• Dr. Tomer Avidor-Reiss, Biological Sciences
• Dr. Maria Diakonova, Biological Sciences
• Dr. Michael Weintraub, Environmental Sciences

College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences
• Dr. Amanda Bryant-Friedrich, Medicinal and Biological Chemistry
• Dr. Frederick Williams, Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics

Faculty members promoted to associate professor were:

College of Medicine and Life Sciences
• Dr. Sumon Nandi, Orthopaedic Surgery
• Dr. Terrence Lewis, Radiology

Faculty members recognized for outstanding scholarly and creative activity

With the support of University Libraries and a subcommittee organized by the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs, President Sharon L. Gaber and Provost Andrew Hsu have recognized 26 faculty members from across campus with outstanding contributions in scholarly or creative activity over the past three years.

These contributions include articles in leading scientific journals with high standing that have attracted significant attention in the community; monographs that were published by premier academic presses that have received positive external reviews; and exhibits or performances of creative activity that have received high acclaim.

“I am pleased that the University Libraries contributed by identifying UT faculty articles and books published in preeminent journals and publishing houses,” said Beau Case, dean of University Libraries.

“Faculty members are raising the profile of The University of Toledo across the breadth of disciplines and programs at UT,” said Dr. Frank Calzonetti, vice president for research. “The excellent work of faculty members in disciplines outside of science and engineering is quite impressive and sometimes goes unnoticed.

“All too often research grant dollars are associated with faculty scholarly and creative activity,” Calzonetti said. “In some disciplines, such as in biomedical science, faculty members cannot sustain their research programs that lead to discoveries and publications without external funding to support laboratory needs. However, in many disciplines, such as pure mathematics or history, external funding is not as critical to faculty success in scholarly and creative activity.”

“Given the many faculty members who have had outstanding contributions in scholarly and creative activity over the past three years, it was a tall order to determine just 26 who should be recognized at this time,” said Dr. Ruth Hottell, chair and professor of the Department of World Languages and Cultures, and selection committee member.

The following faculty members were recognized:

• Dr. Abdollah Afjeh of the Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering;

• Dr. Ana C. Alba-Rubio of the Department of Chemical Engineering;

• Dr. Melissa Baltus of the Department of Sociology and Anthropology;

• Dr. Joe Elhai of the Department of Psychology;

• Dr. Kristen Geaman of the Department of History;

• Dr. Blair Grubb of the Department of Medicine;

• Daniel Hernandez of the Department of Art;

• Dr. Terry Hinds of the Department of of Physiology and Pharmacology;

• Dr. Bina Joe of the Department of Physiology and Pharmacology;

• Dr. Dong-Shik Kim of the Department of Chemical Engineering;

• Dr. Kristin Kirschbaum of the Instrumentation Center;

• Dr. Ashok Kumar of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering;

• Dr. Beata Lecka-Czernik of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery;

• Dr. Barbara Mann of the Jesup Scott Honors College;

• Elizabeth McCuskey of the College of Law;

• Dr. Thor Mednick of the Department of Art;

• Dr. Munier Nazzal of the Department of Surgery;

• Dr. Kim E. Nielsen of the Department of Disability Studies;

• Dr. Michael Rees of the Department of Urology;

• Dr. Denise Ritter Bernardini of the Department of Music;

• Dr. Donald Ronning of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry;

• Stephen Sakowski of the Department of Theatre and Film;

• Dr. Yanfa Yan of the Department of Physics and Astronomy;

• Dr. Matt Yockey of the Department of Theatre and Film;

• Rebecca Zietlow of the College of Law; and

• Evan Zoldan of the College of Law.