UT News » Law

UT News

Categories

Search News

Archives

Resources

Law

Toledo-born actress to give commencement address

Katie Holmes, an internationally recognized actress, producer and director, will return to her hometown to inspire The University of Toledo graduates at the spring commencement ceremony.

Holmes

The Toledo-born actress who has appeared in more than 30 films and television programs will be the commencement speaker for the undergraduate ceremony Saturday, May 4, at 10 a.m. in the Glass Bowl.

The UT Board of Trustees approved Monday an honorary degree for Holmes, in addition to several other board actions.

Holmes made her feature film debut in “The Ice Storm” in 1997, and her breakout role came a year later as Joey Potter in the television series “Dawson’s Creek,” which she portrayed for six years.

Her film credits include “Go,” “Wonder Boys,” “Batman Begins” and “All We Had,” which is one of several projects in which she served as director and producer. In addition, her Broadway experience includes appearing in “All My Sons” and “Dead Accounts.”

Holmes managed and designed the fashion line Holmes & Yang, with her partner Jeanne Yang from 2009 to 2014, and is the co-founder of the Dizzy Feet Foundation that supports dance education in the United States. Holmes is a graduate of Toledo’s Notre Dame Academy. Her father, Martin Holmes Sr., and brother, Martin Holmes Jr., are graduates of the UT College of Law.

Parazynski

Trustees also approved an honorary degree for Dr. Scott Parazynski, a physician, astronaut and inventor, who will address graduates of the College of Medicine and Life Sciences at its commencement ceremony Friday, May 10, at 4 p.m. in Savage Arena.

Parazynski spent 17 years as an astronaut during which time he flew five space shuttle missions and conducted seven spacewalks. In 2016, he was inducted into the U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame at Kennedy Space Center.

Parazynski trained for a career in emergency medicine and trauma and has applied his expertise in the human adaptation to stressful environments. He is the co-founder of Blue Marble Exploration, which is focused on pushing human capabilities in extreme environments through technology innovation.

In other business, the Board of Trustees approved a proposal for a new Master of Applied Business Analytics Degree Program in the College of Business and Innovation. The program’s goal is to meet a growing demand for skilled professionals with analytical problem-solving skills who can apply real-time solutions to business problems.

The proposed 30-credit-hour program combines functional areas of business with business analytics courses and would conclude with an internship project or thesis. The proposal next will be submitted to the Ohio Department of Higher Education. With approval, the program would start by fall semester 2020.

Also approved by trustees were housing and meal plan rates for the upcoming academic year for continuing and incoming students who are not in the current cohort of the Toledo Tuition Guarantee Plan. Dining rates will increase 2.8 percent, with a maximum of $4 more per week depending on the meal plan selected, and housing fees will increase an average of 2.9 percent, which represents an increase of up to $19.60 per week. The new housing and dining rates will help to cover increased costs of operations.

A new collective bargaining agreement with The University of Toledo Police Patrolman’s Association (UTPPA) also was approved by the trustees. The agreement, which runs from Jan. 1, 2019, through Dec. 31, 2021, was ratified by the union Jan. 9. There are 26 employees represented by the UTPPA who will receive wage increases of 1.8 percent effective Jan. 1, 2019, 2 percent effective Jan. 1, 2020, and 2.2 percent effective Jan. 1, 2021.

#MeToo Movement to be discussed Feb. 5

The Catharine S. Eberly Center for Women will host a talk titled “Law and the #MeToo Movement” for Sexual Abuse and Sexual Violence Awareness Week.

Nicole Porter, associate dean for faculty research and development in the UT College of Law, and professor of law, will speak Tuesday, Feb. 5, at noon in Carlson Library Room 1005.

Porter

She will discuss the #MeToo Movement, including the legal aspects and the recent changes in Title IX.

Since the movement gained momentum in November 2017, Porter has been working with law professors across the country to try to increase the public’s awareness of the legal issues surrounding #MeToo.

“There are many misunderstandings and misconceptions about sexual harassment and sexual assault. One of my goals is to help clear up some of the confusion,” Porter said. “I think conversations like this one are difficult, but very important.”

She plans to talk about the difference between sexual harassment and sexual assault, and how Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 addresses sexual harassment in the workplace.

Porter also will address the quickly changing law surrounding Title IX, which applies to educational institutions, and some of the myths surrounding sexual assault and sexual harassment.

To register and for more information, call the Eberly Center at 419.530.8570.

UT dean elected to executive committee of Association of American Law Schools

D. Benjamin Barros, dean of the UT College of Law, was elected to serve a three-year term on the executive committee of the Association of American Law Schools (AALS) at its annual meeting in New Orleans this month.

The AALS Executive Committee is composed of nine members from across the country who are respected among their peers as leaders in legal education. Barros, an expert on property law, was one of the youngest educators to serve on the executive committee when he served a one-year term in 2014.

Barros

“Dean Barros is well-positioned to serve legal education as a member of the AALS Executive Committee,” Judith Areen, executive director of AALS, said. “His thoughtful advice and prior experience on the committee will help guide the association in our efforts to advance excellence in legal education.”

“Law and lawyers are essential to our society and our democracy, and our profession is rooted in legal education,” Barros said. “I am honored to have this opportunity to serve the AALS and its member schools as we work to shape the future of legal education and the legal profession.”

Barros joined UT as dean of the College of Law in 2015. He teaches and writes in the areas of property law and theory, regulatory takings, property law reform, and the philosophy of science. He is the founding editor of the Journal of Law, Property, and Society. In 2015, he released a casebook on property law with Aspen/Wolters Kluwer.

Prior to joining UT, Barros was the associate dean of academic affairs and professor of law at Widener University School of Law. Barros practiced as a litigator before teaching. He clerked for Judge Milton Pollack of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York and later worked at the law firms of Latham & Watkins LLP and Debevoise & Plimpton, both in New York City.

Barros graduated from Fordham University School of Law, where he was an editorial board member on the Fordham Law Review and a member of Order of the Coif. He holds a bachelor’s degree in philosophy from Colgate University and a master’s degree in philosophy from the University of Maryland.

The Association of American Law Schools, founded in 1900, is a nonprofit association of 179 law schools. Its members enroll most of the nation’s law students and produce the majority of the country’s lawyers and judges, as well as many of its lawmakers. The association’s mission is to uphold and advance excellence in legal education. In support of this mission, AALS promotes the core values of excellence in teaching and scholarship, academic freedom, and diversity, including diversity of backgrounds and viewpoints, while seeking to improve the legal profession, to foster justice, and to serve communities — local, national and international.

Princeton Review names UT College of Law among best law schools in U.S.

The Princeton Review once again selected The University of Toledo College of Law in its prestigious list of the top 165 law schools in the country.

The UT College of Law ranked No. 1 for professor accessibility in Ohio and Michigan, and tied for No. 1 in Indiana. Nationwide, UT’s law school is tied for third in the category of professor accessibility with 14 other schools with a score of 97 out of 99. Six schools tied for the No. 2 spot.

“What makes the UT College of Law special is that faculty members are deeply involved in their students’ learning and professional development from day one,” said Geoffrey Rapp, associate dean for academic affairs and Harold A. Anderson Professor of Law and Values. “Our faculty get to know our students — where they are from, where they want to be, and what kind of law they aspire to practice. This puts them in a position to provide support to help students reach their goals.”

The Princeton Review does not rank law schools on an overall basis.

The Princeton Review surveyed 17,700 students attending law school about their school’s academics, student body and campus life. The student surveys for the 2019 list were collected during the 2017-18, 2016-17 and 2015-16 academic years. The ratings also are based on institutional data.

National science leader and Toledo native to deliver UT commencement address Dec. 15

The head of the nation’s oldest and one of its most prestigious laboratories will return home, as Toledo native Michael Witherell is set to deliver the address during The University of Toledo’s undergraduate commencement ceremony Saturday, Dec. 15.

Witherell, director of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) in Berkeley, Calif., will address 1,474 candidates for degrees, including 1,437 bachelor’s and 37 associate’s candidates. The event will take place at 11:30 a.m. in Savage Arena on Main Campus.

Witherell

UT’s graduate commencement ceremony is scheduled at 8 a.m. in Savage Arena and will commemorate 641 candidates for doctoral, education specialist and master’s degrees, as well as graduate certificates. Md Kamal Hossain, emerging cancer researcher and candidate for a doctoral degree at the University, will be the speaker.

Both ceremonies are open to the public and can be viewed live on the UT Views website.

Witherell, a distinguished physicist, educator and science leader, developed the foundation for his future at Toledo’s St. Francis de Sales High School. Salutatorian at age 15, he earned a bachelor of science degree from the University of Michigan and a doctorate in experimental physics from the University of Wisconsin in Madison. After a distinguished career as a university professor performing research in particle physics, he devoted himself to leading large research institutions.

In 2016, Witherell was named director of Berkeley Lab, the oldest of the 17 labs in the
U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories systems. Berkeley Lab is a global leader in fundamental and applied scientific research in physical, biological, energy, computing and environmental sciences. The lab’s employees have earned 13 Nobel Prizes and played a role in the discovery of 16 elements on the periodic table, among its honors. The lab is managed for the DOE by the University of California.

“Our mission at Berkeley Lab is solving the nation’s most challenging problems through great scientific and technological discoveries. I believe that the national assets in addressing these problems include public universities and the students whom they are educating,” Witherell said.

Before joining Berkeley Lab, Witherell spent six years as director of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Illinois. He was vice chancellor for research at the University of California in Santa Barbara, where he also held a presidential chair in the Physics Department.

His primary research interest is in studying the nature of dark matter. He was a contributor to the LUX experiment, which in 2016 published the most sensitive search for interactions of dark matter particles with normal matter. He is now part of an international research team that is building a successor to LUX, known as LZ, which will be three orders of magnitude more sensitive. Data collection is expected to start in 2020.

Witherell is a Fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He chairs the Board of Physics and Astronomy of the National Academies and serves on the National Academies’ Committee on Science, Engineering and Public Policy.

“As a nationally recognized, public research university, The University of Toledo is pleased to have Dr. Witherell as our fall commencement speaker. Research not only helps us to discover new knowledge that advances all areas of study, but also instills critical thinking skills that our students can use to approach problems systematically and come up with solutions that improve everyday life,” UT President Sharon L. Gaber said. “We look forward to Dr. Witherell sharing his insights with our graduates, especially since he grew up in Toledo and has since made tremendous contributions through research.”

Witherell’s personal success can be traced back to the Glass City, as well. He and his wife, Elizabeth Hall Witherell, head of the Princeton Edition of Henry Thoreau’s writings, grew up in the same west Toledo neighborhood and were high school sweethearts. They have a daughter, Lily.

“The foundation for my career and life was my extended family in Toledo,” Witherell said. “Their support and the value they put on education and public service were central to my personal and professional development.”

Hossain

Hossain, the graduate ceremony speaker, is a native of Dhaka, Bangladesh, who came to UT as an industrial pharmacist with a passion to develop innovative medicines.

“I’ve always been interested in studying health-related fields due to the suffering of people in my homeland from different types of disease,” Hossain said. “My focus is to develop a specific targeting approach for a more effective cancer vaccine. My research examined the utilization of a natural antibody already present in human serum that makes the vaccine more convenient to target tumor cells.”

He is a candidate for a doctor of philosophy degree in medicinal chemistry in UT’s College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences.

UT’s fall commencement ceremonies will recognize graduates from the colleges of Arts and Letters; Business and Innovation; Judith Herb College of Education; Engineering; Graduate Studies; Health and Human Services; Natural Sciences and Mathematics; Nursing; Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences; and University College.

The College of Law will host its commencement ceremony Sunday, May 5, at 1 p.m. in the Thompson Student Union Auditorium. Later that week — Friday, May 10, at
4 p.m. — the College of Medicine and Life Sciences will hold its commencement ceremony in Savage Arena.

For more information, visit the UT commencement website.

UT College of Law to hold panel discussion on sexual assault Nov. 13

The University of Toledo College of Law is hosting a panel of experts for a conversation about the legal, practical and emotional consequences of sexual assault Tuesday, Nov. 13, at noon in the Law Center McQuade Auditorium.

Using a question-and-answer format, the panel will address common questions and attempt to debunk many of the myths surrounding sexual assault.

The three panelists are local experts in sexual assault investigation, as well as victim support. Shahrazad Hamdah is the sexual assault and domestic violence advocate at the Center for Student Advocacy and Wellness at The University of Toledo. Hamdah provides support and resources to campus victims of sexual and domestic assault. Jennifer Reed, a 2012 UT law alumna, is an assistant prosecutor in the Ohio Attorney General’s Office with numerous years of experience prosecuting sexual assault and other violent felonies. And Elizabeth Seney, a 2011 UT law graduate, is the assistant director and deputy Title IX coordinator at the University of Michigan, responsible for university investigation of sexual assault cases.

Nicole Buonocore Porter, professor of law and associate dean for faculty research and development at the UT College of Law, will moderate the panel. Porter is the faculty advisor for the Women’s Law Student Association at the UT College of Law and teaches relevant courses such as criminal law, feminist legal theory, and employment discrimination.

“Sexual assault has obviously been in the news quite a bit because of both the #MeToo movement and the Kavanaugh confirmation,” Porter said. “The purpose of this panel is to provide a safe place for students and other audience members to have a conversation with our panelists about sexual assault. Although these conversations are difficult, they are vitally important. In addition to discussing perspectives and experiences of those who have been sexual assault victims, we hope to dispel common myths about sexual assault.”

The free, public event is sponsored by the UT College of Law.

‘The Crime of Complicity’ topic of Stone Law Lecture

Dr. Amos N. Guiora, professor of law at the University of Utah, will present the David S. Stone Law Lecture Monday, Nov. 5, in the Law Center McQuade Auditorium.

The title of his talk is “The Crime of Complicity: The Bystander From the Holocaust to Today.”
There will be two opportunities to attend this event: a lunch and learn lecture from noon to 1 p.m. and an evening lecture from 7 to 8:15 p.m.

Guiora

If you are a bystander and witness a crime, should intervention to prevent that crime be a legal obligation? Or is moral responsibility enough? In his 2017 book, “The Crime of Complicity: The Bystander in the Holocaust,” Guiora addresses these profoundly important questions and the bystander-victim relationship from a deeply personal and legal perspective, focusing on the Holocaust and then exploring cases in contemporary society.

Sharing the experiences of his parents, who were Holocaust survivors, and his grandparents, who did not survive, and drawing on a wide range of historical material and interviews, Guiora examines the bystander during three distinct events: death marches, the German occupation of Holland, and the German occupation of Hungary. He explains that while the Third Reich created policy, its implementation was dependent on bystander non-intervention.

Bringing the issue of intervention into current perspective, he examines sexual assault cases at Vanderbilt and Stanford universities, as well as other crimes when bystanders chose whether or not to intervene, and the resulting consequences.

Guiora is a recognized scholar on national security and terrorism. He teaches criminal procedure, international law, global perspectives on counterterrorism, and religion and terrorism — incorporating innovative, scenario-based instruction to address national and international security issues and dilemmas.

Guiora earned his AB in history from Kenyon College, his JD from Case Western Reserve University School of Law, and his PhD from Leiden University.

The evening lecture is approved for 1.0 total Continuing Legal Education credit hours, with book sales and signing to follow, as well as a special tribute to Judge David Katz by U.S. District Judge Dan Aaron Polster.

“We are glad to continue our collaboration with the Toledo Jewish Community Foundation on this lecture series,” said D. Benjamin Barros, dean of the UT College of Law. “The issues surrounding the obligations of bystanders are important and difficult, and I look forward to learning from Professor Guiora’s talk.”

This free, public lecture is co-sponsored by the UT College of Law and the Toledo Jewish Community Foundation of the Jewish Federation of Greater Toledo.

Register at utoledo.edu/law/events/stone-law-lecture.html.

UT law graduates have strong showing in Ohio bar exams

The number of graduates from The University of Toledo College of Law who passed the July bar exam in Ohio on the first try is well above the state average.

The newly released data shows the first-time passage rate for UT law graduates taking the bar exam is 84 percent, up from 74 percent last year in July. The state average in Ohio this year is 79 percent.

“We have done a lot in the past three years to revamp our bar program, and it is gratifying to see positive results,” D. Benjamin Barros, dean of the UT College of Law, said. “We hope to continue this positive trend into the future as we see the impact of improved credentials of first-year students entering the UT College of Law and further improvements to our bar program.”

The UT College of Law is committed to preparing students for a successful career with programming and partnerships dedicated to bar passage.

In the last few years, the College of Law aligned its curriculum to bar-tested subjects, developed a new first-year support program, expanded its third-year bar prep course, and implemented a legal analysis course and academic success contracts.

The UT College of Law also created the position of director of academic success and bar preparation. This position held by Lesa Byrnes oversees the Bar Passage Program that is designed to prepare both third-year students and graduates for the bar exam. Through post-graduation mentoring, every UT law graduate is paired with a faculty mentor to provide support during bar exam study.

Most recently, the UT College of Law partnered with BARBRI, a company headquartered in Texas, to offer student access to its comprehensive bar review course with flexible classroom, online and mobile learning environments.

‘Regional Water and More’ topic of Great Lakes Water Conference Nov. 2

Regionalization of water and sewer systems will be the prime focus of the 18th annual Great Lakes Water Conference this week at The University of Toledo College of Law.

The conference titled “Regional Water and More” will take place Friday, Nov. 2, from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Law Center McQuade Auditorium.

“Regionalization of water services is an important issue across the nation,” said Ken Kilbert, UT professor of law and director of the Legal Institute of the Great Lakes. “And locally this conference could not be more timely, in light of the ballot question facing city of Toledo voters on Nov. 6 regarding a regional water commission.”

The keynote speaker will be Darren Nichols, executive director of the Great Lakes Commission, at 8:45 a.m.

The first panel at 9:15 a.m. will concentrate on Ohio, including a possible regional approach to drinking water among the city of Toledo and nearby communities.

The second panel at 11 a.m. will discuss the trend toward regionalization of water and sewer systems beyond the Buckeye State, including the new regional authority in the Detroit area.

A third panel at 1:30 p.m. will address the rights of recreational paddlers versus private landowners, developments in the legal fight against algae in Lake Erie, and regulation of discharges of pollutants to groundwater under the federal Clean Water Act.

The one-day conference sponsored by the UT College of Law and its Legal Institute of the Great Lakes is free to the public. Registration is $75 for attorneys seeking 4.5 hours of Continuing Legal Education credit.

For more information about the conference, read the Great Lakes Water Conference 2018 brochure.

For Continuing Legal Education credit or a box lunch, check out the Great Lakes Water Conference registration website.

UT faculty recognized for tenure and promotion

Sixty-four University of Toledo faculty members were honored in a special 2018-19 tenure and promotion celebration Sept. 28 in Carlson Library. Last year, 53 faculty members earned tenure and promotion.

Each honoree was asked to select a book that was instrumental to his or her success, and these books — each containing a bookplate commemorating the honoree’s milestone — are now housed in the library.

“We began this tradition when I joined UT because we believe recognizing faculty helps to foster excellence in research and academics, and helps fuel innovation in all fields of study,” said President Sharon L. Gaber.

“Faculty success, together with student success, are two of the highest priorities of the University and of the Office of the Provost,” said Provost Andrew Hsu. “We have implemented a number of new programs to enhance faculty success since President Gaber joined The University of Toledo. And while the large number of faculty honorees this year demonstrates the progress that we have made in faculty success, the credit goes to the hard work and dedication of our faculty.”

UT faculty receiving tenure are Dr. Hossein Elgafy and Dr. Xin Wang, College of Medicine and Life Sciences.

Appointed as professor with tenure are Dr. Anne Balazs, College of Business and Innovation, and Dr. Raymond Witte, Judith Herb College of Education. And appointed as associate professor with tenure is Dr. Denise Bartell, Jesup Scott Honors College.

Faculty members who were promoted to professor are Dr. Tomer Avidor-Reiss, Dr. Maria Diakonova, Dr. Timothy Mueser and Dr. Michael Weintraub, College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics; Dr. Amanda Bryant-Friedrich and Dr. Frederick Williams, College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences; Dr. Florian Feucht and Dr. Tod Shockey, Judith Herb College of Education; Dr. Bashar Gammoh and Dr. Margaret Hopkins, College of Business and Innovation; Dr. Tavis Glassman and Dr. Sheryl Milz, College of Health and Human Services; Dr. Edmund Lingan, Dr. Mysoon Rizk, Dr. Sujata Shetty and Dr. Jami Taylor, College of Arts and Letters; Elizabeth McCuskey and Evan Zoldan, College of Law; Dr. Azedine Medhkour, Dr. Theodor Rais, Dr. Tallat Rizk and Dr. David Sohn, College of Medicine and Life Sciences; and Dr. Devinder Kaur, Dr. Scott Molitor, Dr. Youngwoo Seo, Dr. Gursel Serpen, Dr. Chunhua Sheng, Dr. Sridhar Viamajala and Dr. Hongyan Zhang, College of Engineering.

Promoted to professor with tenure are Dr. Guillermo Vazquez and Dr. Hongyan Li, College of Medicine and Life Sciences.

Faculty members who received tenure and promotion to associate professor include Dr. Wissam AbouAlaiwi, College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences; Dr. Halim Ayan and Dr. Eda Yildirim-Ayan, College of Engineering; Dr. Liat Ben-Moshe, Daniel Hernandez, Dr. Jason Levine, Dr. Thor Mednick and Dr. Daniel Thobias, College of Arts and Letters; Dr. Joseph Cooper and Dr. Kainan Wang, College of Business and Innovation; Dr. Rafael Garcia-Mata, College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics; Dr. Mouhammad Jumaa, Dr. Krishna Reddy and Dr. Diana Shvydka, College of Medicine and Life Sciences; and Dr. Aravindhan Natarajan, College of Health and Human Services.

Faculty promoted to associate professor are Dr. Daniel Gehling, Dr. Claudiu Georgescu, Dr. Bryan Hinch, Dr. Kimberly Jenkins, Dr. Jeremy Laukka, Dr. Terrence Lewis, Dr. Jiayong Liu, Dr. Sumon Nandi and Dr. Syed Zaidi, College of Medicine and Life Sciences; and Dr. Randall Vesely, Judith Herb College of Education.

Faculty who received renewal of their titles with tenure are Michelle Cavalieri and Bryan Lammon, College of Law.

And Dr. George Darah was promoted to clinical associate professor in the College of Medicine and Life Sciences.

“We wish each of these individuals continued success at the University, and ask our campus community to join us in congratulating them,” Hsu said.

Faculty members posed for a photo with President Sharon L. Gaber and Provost Andrew Hsu during the tenure and promotion celebration held last month in Carlson Library.