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Northwest Ohio students to experience medical school at CampMed

Teenagers today and potential physicians tomorrow will learn the tools of the trade and practice their clinical skills at the 20th annual CampMed program at The University of Toledo.

The two-day CampMed program will be held Thursday and Friday, June 15 and 16, on Health Science Campus.

The 2017 class has 39 incoming freshman high school students from across northwest Ohio who will get a sampling of medical school by participating in hands-on lessons such as learning to dress for the operating room and suturing wounds.

“It’s imperative to reach out to young people early to nurture their interests in science and discovery. Their dreams for the future, which for some might include becoming a doctor, are attainable, and we want to show them there are people who want to help,” said Courtney K. Combs, director of the UT and Ohio Area Health Education Center programs.

“CampMed gives students the opportunity to learn firsthand what it’s like to be in the medical field before they even start high school. The participants really enjoy learning from current students in the UT College of Medicine and Life Sciences.”

CampMed is a scholarship program at no cost to the students, most of whom are first-generation college students and other underrepresented groups. The camp is sponsored by the UT Area Health Education Center program, which along with other programs throughout the country, strives to improve the health of individuals and communities by developing the health-care workforce. First- and second-year UT medical students serve as camp counselors, and the campers also will interact with physicians and faculty members.

The students will begin Thursday morning after the welcoming ceremonies with a tools of the trade session where they will learn to use medical instruments such as blood pressure cuffs and stethoscopes. Lessons will continue for two days with opportunities to tour a gross anatomy lab, make a cast and more.

CampMed, which began in 1998, is a competitive program that requires students to submit a letter of recommendation, a nomination from a science or math teacher or counselor, and a personal essay to be chosen to participate.

Pioneering surgeon to speak at College of Medicine commencement May 26

Internationally renowned minimally invasive surgeon Dr. Mehran Anvari will be the commencement speaker for the UT College of Medicine and Life Sciences graduation ceremony Friday, May 26, at 2 p.m. at Stranahan Theater, 4645 Heatherdowns Blvd. in Toledo.

There are more than 200 candidates for degrees: 162 for doctor of medicine degrees; 10 for a doctor of philosophy degrees; 29 for master’s degrees; and four for graduate certificates.

Anvari

Anvari, one of the first physicians in Canada to use robotics in surgery who also won a NASA award for his role in developing an automated robot used for detecting the early stages of breast cancer, will receive an honorary doctor of science degree.

“We are fortunate to have Dr. Anvari serve as the speaker for our upcoming commencement,” said Dr. Christopher Cooper, senior vice president for clinical affairs and dean of the College of Medicine and Life Sciences. “His impressive body of work, particularly in minimal access techniques, should serve as an example to our graduates that pushing boundaries and finding new and innovative methods to replace established practices can lead to better, more positive outcomes.”

A tenured professor and chair in minimally invasive surgery and surgical innovation at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Anvari is the founding director of the McMaster Institute for Surgical Invention, Innovation and Education; the Centre for Minimal Access Surgery; and the Centre for Surgical Invention and Innovation.

“It is an honor to be invited to speak at the commencement of The University of Toledo’s College of Medicine and Life Sciences,” Anvari said. “My talk will focus on how innovation is an essential ingredient for social and economic progress and can solve the problems facing our global community. It should be a goal for all students and drive our future academic and professional endeavors.”

Anvari is a pioneer in his field. He is the founding director of the Centre for Minimal Access Surgery and scientific director and CEO of the Centre for Surgical Invention and Innovation, affiliated with McMaster University and St. Joseph Healthcare Hamilton.

In 2003, he established the world’s first telerobotic surgical service linking St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton and a community hospital.

In addition, Anvari has authored more than 120 publications and has been an invited lecturer numerous times on the outcomes and evidence for the increasing use of laparoscopic esophagogastric and bowel surgery, as well as on the use of robotics in surgery.

Girls in Science Day at UT May 10

More than 140 sophomore high school girls will visit The University of Toledo Wednesday, May 10, when prominent female scientists and engineers across the region will introduce them to the exciting world of science and technology careers through hands-on experiments and demonstrations.

The eighth annual Women in STEMM Day of Meetings, which goes by the acronym WISDOM, will take place from 8 a.m. to 2:15 p.m. on UT’s Main Campus and Health Science Campus.

UT faculty and industrial professionals from Marathon Petroleum Corp. and Spartan Chemical Co. Inc. will help inspire a passion for science careers by exploring the tools of the trade. The visiting high school students also will get to interact with female graduate students in the various areas in science, engineering and the health sciences.

The girls will carry out investigations in a number of areas, including physics and astronomy, chemistry, biology, engineering, pharmacy, and medicine.

Activities for students will include building solar cells; using liquid nitrogen to make objects float in the air; swabbing their cheeks for a DNA sample; building a motor; generating electricity on a bike; making biodiesel fuel; using patient simulators to practice patient interventions; and making lip balm.

During lunch in the Brady Center on the Engineering campus, the students will learn about coding and its importance for future careers in STEMM.

“Girls are just as interested in science and technology as their male peers, but the number of girls that make it to college to pursue a major and get a job in a STEMM field is not growing as we need it to do,” said Edith Kippenhan, senior lecturer in the UT Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, director of WISDOM, and past president of the Northwestern Ohio Chapter of the Association for Women in Science. “Women approach problems differently, and they come up with different, equally valid solutions. We need them in the workforce to better design products and solutions for the various problems facing our society and our planet.”

Students from Toledo Public, Washington Local and Oregon Schools, as well as from the Toledo Islamic Academy and Wildwood Environmental Academy, will participate in WISDOM at the University.

“It is our goal to show the students they have a real and doable pathway to their dream career in STEMM,” Kippenhan said. “It is our hope that a visit to UT for events such as WISDOM will inspire them to embrace science and technology, and turn their dreams into reality.”

The event is hosted by the Northwestern Ohio Chapter of the Association for Women in Science. Sponsors include Marathon Petroleum Corp., Columbia Gas, Spartan Chemical Co., the Toledo Section of the American Chemical Society, the Catharine S. Eberly Center for Women, and the UT colleges of Engineering, Medicine and Life Sciences, Natural Sciences and Mathematics, and Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences.

Executive assistant selected for Hymore Award

Candace “Candy” Busdiecker, executive assistant and liaison committee on medical education coordinator in the College of Medicine and Life Sciences, is the 2017 recipient of the Diane Hymore Exemplar of Excellence Award.

Busdiecker received the honor named for the longtime executive secretary to former President Lloyd Jacobs April 19 at the Outstanding Staff Awards in the Thomas and Elizabeth Brady Engineering Innovation Center. The award is presented annually to an individual whose work defines the core values of the University in Hymore’s spirit of support, encouragement and service.

Dr. Kaye M. Patten, senior vice president for student affairs, left, and President Sharon L. Gaber, right, presented the Diane Hymore Exemplar of Excellence Award to Candace “Candy” Busdiecker.

“Candy wears many hats in her position. She provides assistance to the administrative director of operations for the dean, which is an extremely busy office. She is also taking calls, emails or visits in her capacity as ‘concierge’ for specific needs for UT Medical Center,” one nominator wrote. “She is always calm, smiling, happy and welcoming. No matter how small or large of an issue, she maintains professionalism throughout. She follows through and also follows up. She does not consider any matter resolved until she knows it has been satisfactorily done.”

She joined the University in 1995 as a secretary in the Department of Medicine in the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, becoming a secretary II in 1999. One year later, Busdiecker took on the role of administrative research coordinator staying within the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. She joined the College of Medicine Dean’s Office as administrative assistant to the chancellor in 2011.

“Candy is a very patient person. One of her biggest assets is the art of how she listens. She honors each person as unique and knows that it is not a one-size-fits-all type of approach in doing her job,” one nominator wrote. “She understands that the success of UTMC and UT as a whole is built one person at a time. Whether she is dealing with members for the affiliation, faculty, staff or students, her mission is that they have a positive experience however she is able to help.”

“I enjoy the people at UT and working with such a great team in the College of Medicine Dean’s Office,” Busdiecker said. “There is no way to express my gratitude to everyone for nominating and choosing me for this award. Ms. Hymore was an amazing lady and will always have a special place in my heart.”

University recognizes faculty, staff for advising, research, teaching, outreach work

UT outstanding advisers, researchers and teachers, and recipients of the Edith Rathbun Award for Outreach and Engagement, were honored last week.

Recipients of the Outstanding Advisor Award were:

Winners of the Outstanding Adviser Award were Rose Marie Ackerman and Dr. Matthew Franchetti.

Rose Marie Ackerman
, associate director of student services in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering in the College of Engineering. She joined the University in 2006.

“Rose is the only adviser I know that does long-range plans for students. This helps tremendously because I am able to check off the classes I have already taken because she provides a specialized plan for each individual,” one nominator wrote. “She is the best adviser I’ve had at any university, and I’ve been to three different universities.” “Rose is always willing to see and talk to any student,” another noted. “She responds to emails quickly with any information needed. I just changed my major, and Rose is the person who helped me the most.” Another wrote, “She is the go-to person in the department for policies and procedures.”

Dr. Matthew Franchetti, associate professor and associate chair of mechanical, industrial and manufacturing engineering in the College of Engineering. He began working at UT in 2007.

“Dr. Franchetti is the most helpful person I have ever met,” one nominator noted. Another wrote, “The other day I walked into his office looking for advice on going to grad school. He went through the positives and negatives and all of the things required in the application process. He sat down and went over the different courses of study and what each plan entails. On top of that, he took the time to explain what the University is kind of looking for and offered to be one of my references. I do not know how I would have gotten through engineering without him.”

Recipients of the Outstanding Research and Scholarship Award were:

Receiving Outstanding Research Awards were, from left, Dr. Robert Collins, Lee J. Strang, Dr. Blair Grubb and Dr. Mohamed Elahinia.

Dr. Robert Collins
, NEG Endowed Chair and Distinguished University Professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy in the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics.

Collins is an internationally recognized expert on thin films and photovoltaics, especially for his groundbreaking contributions in the use of optical measurements, in particular, ellipsometry for assessments of real-time thin-film growth. This work is not only important to the photovoltaics industry, but also is valuable to related technologies such as displays and sensors. His total research funding, either as principal investigator or co-principal investigator at both UT and his former university, exceeds $48 million. He is a prolific writer with more than 450 peer-reviewed journal and conference proceedings articles, and he is the editor or co-editor of nine books. His published work has more than 10,000 citations.

Dr. Mohamed Elahinia, professor of mechanical, industrial and manufacturing engineering in the College of Engineering.

Elahinia’s group, with support from the Ohio Federal Research Network and NASA Glenn, has fabricated high-temperature shape memory alloys in 3D printing for the first time. His research on low-temperature shape memory alloys has resulted in several medical devices, which are at various stages of commercialization. In collaboration with NASA Glenn and the Cleveland Clinic, he organized the development of the Nitinol Commercialization Center to support startup companies. He has been the principal investigator and co-investigator on 37 research projects, bringing in more than $12 million in awards. He is the author of a leading book on shape memory alloys, as well as more than 70 journal articles; his publications have been cited about 2,000 times.

Dr. Blair Grubb, Distinguished University Professor and director of the Electrophysiology Program in the College of Medicine and Life Sciences.

He is one of the world’s authorities in the treatment of syncope — abrupt, brief loss of consciousness — and other disorders of the autonomic nervous system. He has patients referred to him from all over the world to help those dealing with severe autonomic disorders. His patients testify on how he takes a personal interest in their condition, and he has a long list of testimonials on how he has provided patients with ways to improve their condition. Grubb has published more than 240 scientific papers, authored five books, written 35 book chapters, and has been the recipient of 10 research grants while at UT. He has been recognized as one of America’s Top Doctor’s 15 years in a row.

Lee J. Strang, the John W. Stoepler Professor of Law and Values in the College of Law.

Strang is an expert in constitutional law, particularly originalism and constitutional interpretation. He has expertise on the topic of law and religion and the history of Catholic legal education. He is highly sought as an invited speaker and expert on constitutional law matters and has presented his work at more than 150 conferences at top institutions. Since arriving at UT, Strang has authored 17 articles, two book chapters and five book reviews, as well as co-written a 1,500-page casebook. His work is highly regarded; Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens cited Strang’s work on the original meaning of “religion” in the First Amendment. Strang’s work also was cited in the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals Hobby Lobby case.

Recipients of the Edith Rathbun Award for Outreach and Engagement were:

Recipients of the Edith Rathbun Award for Outreach and Engagement were Dr. Lisa Pescara-Kovach and Dr. Andrew Jorgensen.

Dr. Lisa Pescara-Kovach
, associate professor of educational foundations and leadership in the Judith Herb College of Education. She is the co-chair of the UT Anti-Bullying Task Force, a campus violence prevention and protection trainer for the Department of Justice, and author of “School Shootings and Suicides: Why We Must Stop the Bullies.”

“Dr. Pescara-Kovach has performed countless service in the community in working with the prevention of tragedy in our schools and workplaces. She works with University and community agencies in multiple stages: preventing bullying and other aggressive behaviors; preventing targeted violence and suicide; and postvention of first responders, victims and witnesses when such incidents occur,” one nominator wrote. “While many faculty think their work is life-changing, few (outside the medical fields) can honestly claim their work saves lives; Dr. Pescara-Kovach is such a faculty member.”

Dr. Andrew Jorgensen, associate professor of chemistry in the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics. He studied climate change during his sabbatical at the National Council for Science and the Environment, helping to create Climate Adaption Mitigation E-Learning, an online program with more than 300 resources on climate change.

“Dr. Jorgensen has given more than 150 lectures to general public audiences all over the world about climate change. Having been an audience member, I can attest to the way he presents scientific knowledge in a nonpolitical, approachable way that makes a strong case for the need to address this topic,” one nominator wrote. “I admire his energy, commitment and passion, and am deeply respectful of his personal mission to educate as many people as he can about the importance of climate change to our global future.”

Recipients of the Outstanding Teacher Award were:

Taking home Outstanding Teacher Awards were, from left, Dr. Patricia Sopko, Dr. Ruslan Slutsky, Dr. Jillian Bornak, Dr. Nitin Puri and Dr. Todd Crail.

Dr. Jillian Bornak
, associate lecturer of physics and astronomy in the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics. She began teaching at the University in 2014.

“She brought her enthusiasm for science into the classroom every Tuesday and Thursday night when we were all tired and drained. Her enthusiasm was contagious, and her energy made it easy to show up to every class that semester,” one nominator wrote. “She gave us every tool we needed to learn the material and pass her course with a good grade. She taught us with both ease and eagerness for her students to learn. Her students gained knowledge of these tough physics concept without ever feeling like we were too behind or too incapable of learning these concepts. The University is lucky to have her.”

Dr. Todd Crail, associate lecturer of environmental sciences in the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics. He joined the faculty in 2012.

“I have yet to meet any professor as engaging and passionate about the environment as Dr. Crail,” one nominator wrote. “He has a distinct voice and motivation in what he teaches — take action. If you want a better world, a better environment, then you have to act upon it. Dr. Crail encourages students’ critical thinking, he supports the curious mind, and he makes time for his students.” Another noted, “He has changed the lives of so many students, and he deserves to finally be rewarded for all the hours of hard work and dedication that he puts into his class, activities, service learning, and the Department of Environmental Sciences.”

Dr. Nitin Puri, assistant professor of physiology and pharmacology in the College of Medicine and Life Sciences. He has been at the University since 2012.

“Dr. Puri teaches physiology with great passion and consistently has the highest turnouts for lectures and review sessions. He expects the most from his students and repeatedly encourages you to think like a physician,” one nominator wrote. “Dr. Puri’s teaching style is interactive and certainly yields the strongest staying power of the basic sciences. I still use his notes to prepare for clinical rotations. Dr. Puri is more than a teacher. He is a fierce advocate for students, an outstanding mentor and, most importantly, a genuine person.” Another wrote, “Dr. Puri prepares you for the future, not just exams, but for clinical practice unlike any other professor.”

Dr. Ruslan Slutsky, professor of early childhood education, higher education and special education in the Judith Herb College of Education. He came to the University in 2001.

“Dr. Slutsky always makes time for his students. He is always willing to give extra help, and he goes out of his way to provide students with learning experiences outside of the classroom — research opportunities, helps send projects to conferences, etc. His lectures are always thought-provoking and stimulate deep classroom discussions. He expects a lot from his students and, in turn, his students achieve great things,” one nominator wrote. “I am thankful to have had him as a professor and am thankful for all the things he has done for the college, as well as the University and community as a whole.”

Dr. Patricia Sopko, instructor in the College of Nursing. She joined the faculty in 2010.

“I was essentially failing my pathopharmocology class despite hours of studying. I always felt the exams to be very fair, and I approached Dr. Sopko to help me understand what I was doing wrong,” one nominator wrote. “When I did eventually speak with her, she in no way looked down upon me or made me feel intimidated, despite the fact that I should have approached her long before to ask for help. She not only clarified what I was doing wrong, she also made sure I was properly preparing for the final exam. She helped me improve my overall critical thinking abilities. The fact that she took the extra time to help me is something that I greatly appreciate.”

American Heart Association honors dean with Pulse of Toledo Award

Dr. Christopher Cooper, dean of the College of Medicine and Life Sciences and executive vice president for clinical affairs, recently was honored with the American Heart Association’s Pulse of Toledo Award at the 2017 Toledo Heart Ball.  

“Based on Dr. Cooper’s substantial impact on cardiovascular science, prevention and care over many years, the Executive Leadership Team of the 2017 Heart Ball nominated Dr. Cooper for the Pulse of Toledo recognition and award,” according to a statement from the American Heart Association of Northwest Ohio. “Dr. Cooper’s reach and impact has gone well beyond the city of Toledo, the state of Ohio, and throughout the world of cardiovascular care. Celebrating his impact and recognizing one of the predominate leaders in community health was a cornerstone of the 2017 Heart Ball.”

Dr. Christopher Cooper, flanked by Dr. Laura Murphy, assistant professor of medicine, left, and Nicole Hollingsworth, women’s golf coach, received the American Heart Association’s Pulse of Toledo Award at the 2017 Toledo Heart Ball. 

This marked the 20th year for this event, which brings together people from all over the community in an evening that celebrates the work and mission of the American Heart Association.

“I am humbled to have been honored with this award from the American Heart Association,” Cooper said. “I have personally seen the impact of the work the American Heart Association has done, one of my first grants was a local American Heart Association award that was critically important for my academic development. The support that the American Heart Association gives to early career investigators is so important for many of our faculty.”

According to the American Heart Association, the Heart Ball celebrates “donors and volunteers; and — most important — the lives saved and improved because of everyone’s efforts.”

Contributions received at the Toledo Heart Ball help support cardiovascular research, professional and community education, and advocacy efforts. 

Students use human simulators to practice caring for brain-dead, organ-donor patients

One organ donor can save eight lives, according to the American Transplant Foundation.

The University of Toledo is using state-of-the art simulation technology to help future medical professionals practice how to preserve and protect the organs of patients who suffered traumatic brain injury and brain death.

Using human simulators in the Jacobs Interprofessional Simulation Center, a half a dozen UT graduate students participated last week in a training scenario on caring for brain-dead patients who are organ donors.

“Our students are getting hands-on practice on how to medically manage brain-dead patients in order to recover organs and help save lives of others through donation,” said James Judkins, assistant professor in the Department of Physician Assistant Studies and director of the Human Donation Science Program.

Two of the students who participated in the mock scenario, Riley Messer and Dylan Launder, thought the experience was not only beneficial, but unique.

“Actually coming into the Sim Center allows us to have real-time experience … and understanding,” Riley said.

Dylan added, “We’re there advocating for the donor that everything possible is done [to save her or him]. If we come on and we see that this test might have been done wrong, we are not just going to ignore it, we’re going to say, ‘You might want to redo it’ because we want to make sure that everything is how it needs to be.”

The students, who are on track to graduate in July with master’s degrees, are studying human donation science in the College of Medicine and Life Sciences.

As part of program curriculum, the students have been learning the principles of medical management in brain death. The use of the Jacobs Interprofessional Simulation Center allows these principles to be applied through the use of human simulators prior to going on clinical rotations in spring.

University Women’s Commission recognizes employees, awards scholarships to students

Five UT employees were honored last week for exceptional achievement and dedication to the campus community at the 31st annual Outstanding Women’s Award ceremony.

More than 70 attended the University Women’s Commission program, which was held Wednesday in the Savage Arena Joe Grogan Room. Dr. Amanda Bryant-Friedrich, dean of the College of Graduate Studies, gave a talk, “Oh, the Places You’ll Go!” The 2015 recipient of the Alice H. Skeens Outstanding Woman Award shared her story, including her love of science, working in Europe, and how she came to UT.

Recipients of the 2017 Dr. Alice H. Skeens Outstanding Woman Award were, from left, Dr. Kasumi Yamazaki, Dr. Kaye M. Patten, Sherry Stanfa-Stanley, Dr. Nina I. McClelland and Dr. Dorothea Sawicki.

The recipients of the 2017 Dr. Alice H. Skeens Outstanding Woman Award were:

• Dr. Nina I. McClelland, dean emerita of the College of Arts and Sciences, professor emerita of chemistry, and executive in residence in the College of Business and Innovation. She served as dean of the College of Arts and Sciences from 2008 to 2011. A UT alumna, she received a bachelor’s degree in biology in 1951 and a master’s degree in interdisciplinary studies in 1963. McClelland also received an honorary doctorate of science from the University. During her career, she has won numerous honors, including the 2016 Women in Conservation Award from the National Wildlife Federation for her accomplishments in protecting safe water around the world, promoting clean energy, and preserving wildlife and habitats in Ohio. In 2010, she was inducted into the Ohio Women’s Hall of Fame.

“Dr. McClelland is internationally recognized for her expertise in environmental chemistry. She was elected director at large of the American Chemical Society and served in that role for nine years. She was elected chair of the board of directors, a position she held for three years. Nina served the NSF International for 30 years, including 15 years as chair of the board of directors and executive committee, president and chief executive officer,” one nominator wrote. “Dr. McClelland is an amazing woman who has dedicated her life to using science to make this world a better place.”

• Dr. Kaye M. Patten, senior vice president for student affairs. She has been working at the University 12 years. She served as chair of the 2016 UT Community Charitable Campaign, which exceeded its goal and raised $134,568 for nearly 220 nonprofit area organizations.

“I have worked with many dedicated women in my 30 years in higher education. Dr. Kaye is in a class by herself. Through working with her, I have witnessed a level of energy, commitment, respect and advocacy for students that I had not experienced before,” one nominator wrote. “Dr. Patten treats each student exactly how she would want her own son or daughter treated. I have admired and appreciated Dr. Kaye’s approach — to always be upfront with students, letting them know their responsibilities and how UT can help them achieve their goals. She understands the life-changing power of higher education, and it is clear that she wants the best for our students. If she is not attending a student event after hours or on weekends, she is representing the University in the community through the Toledo branch of Links Inc., a women’s service organization whose mission is to enrich the cultural and economic lives of African Americans. Dr. Kaye does nothing halfway — if she makes a commitment, she’s all in. To borrow from the UTC3 campaign slogan: She simply gives.”

• Dr. Dorothea Sawicki, vice provost for health affairs and university accreditation, and professor of medical microbiology and immunology. In 1977, she began her career as an assistant professor at the Medical College of Ohio. She received tenure and worked her way up to professor. She also served in several administrative roles in the College of Graduate Studies and in the College of Medicine and Life Sciences; as secretary-treasurer of the American Society for Virology since 2006; and as a member of the Journal of Virology editorial board since 1988.

“Dr. Sawicki has contributed to the University in a variety of ways for almost 40 years. She was one of the first people I met when I began at UT in 2010. At the time, I was a temporary hire helping the institution prepare for its Higher Learning Commission accreditation visit, and Thea was one of the committee co-chairs. I was immediately struck by her direct, no-nonsense approach to getting things done,” one nominator wrote. “I appreciate the historical background she is often able to provide about some obscure policy or way of doing things, and her unwavering commitment to the University. She is successful in her field and is a role model for women in science; she is extremely involved in the UT community at all levels; she maintains a positive, can-do attitude in her work; and she is active in various women’s issues.”

• Sherry Stanfa-Stanley, director of communication and fund stewardship with the UT Foundation. She joined the University in 1992. Over the past 25 years, she has significantly enhanced the Foundation’s internal and external communications, donor relations, and stewardship efforts. A UT alumna, she received a bachelor’s degree in communication in 1983. In 2013, Stanfa-Stanley embarked on “The 52/52 Project,” a year where she challenged herself every week with a new experience. As she turned 52, she shook things up. Her adventures included suiting up as Rocksy the mascot for a UT soccer game; babysitting quadruplets; wearing pajamas in public for a day; riding with police and going on a raid with the vice squad and SWAT team; visiting a nude beach; performing as a mime outside a shopping center in Kentucky; and crashing a wedding reception — and catching the bride’s bouquet.

“All the while, Sherry blogged about her amazingly crazy year on Facebook.com/The52at52Project. The witty writer served up entertainment and enlightenment for nearly 5,000 followers. Her book, ‘Finding My Badass Self: A Year of Truths and Dares,’ will be published Aug. 15 by She Writes Press,” one nominator wrote. “Sherry likes to call herself ‘a cautionary tale,’ but she really is a role model, showing it’s never too late to change your life. Her heady heroism is inspiring.”

• Dr. Kasumi Yamazaki, assistant professor of Japanese in the Department of Foreign Languages. She started to work part time at UT in 2011. She is the social media coordinator for the Japanese Studies Program and adviser of the Calligraphy Club. She also is a translator in various community organizations local and abroad, as well as assistant coordinator for the Toledo Sister Cities International. A UT alumna, she received a bachelor of arts degree in global studies in 2009, a master of arts degree in English in 2011, and a doctoral degree in curriculum and instruction in 2015.

“Dr. Yamazaki’s contributions and achievements are numerous and balanced in research, teaching and service. She has three articles in press, and in the 2016-17 academic year, she presented or is scheduled to present eight sessions at international and national conferences,” one nominator wrote. “Dr. Yamazaki has implemented a 3D virtual world simulation game into Japanese as a foreign language classroom and designed an immersive Japanese curriculum for her students. She uses an experiential and integrative computer-assisted language learning framework, conducting classes in a 3D massive multiplayer online learning environment to enhance students’ acquisition of Japanese and cultural proficiency. With what Dr. Yamazaki calls computer-assisted learning of communication, she developed an advanced Japanese course that is based in a 3D simulation in Tokyo. Through communicative collaboration with native Japanese game-users online, she made it possible for students to acquire knowledge to function in Japan.”

Students who received $1,000 scholarships from the University Women’s Commissin were, from left, Areeba Shaw, Bianca Caniglia, Jennifer Zaurov and Jessica Angelov.

The University Women’s Commission also presented $1,000 scholarships to four students. Receiving awards based on academic achievement, support of women’s and gender issues, and campus involvement were Jessica Angelov, a senior majoring in interdisciplinary studies with a minor in entrepreneurship, family and small business; Bianca Caniglia, a senior majoring in environmental science with a minor in women’s and gender studies; Jennifer Zaurov, a junior majoring in communication with a minor in psychology; and Areeba Shaw, a sophomore majoring in media communication.

UT Medical Center opens new Inpatient Detox Unit

The University of Toledo Medical Center is accepting patients to its new Adult Detoxification Inpatient Unit on the sixth floor of the hospital.

The 10-bed unit has a dedicated team of nurses, social workers and other staff with training and experience in detox and behavioral health. The detox unit will help patients safely manage the physical symptoms of withdrawal associated with stopping drug or alcohol abuse and then connect them with services to enhance their possibility for success in overcoming addiction.

Singh

“There is a drug abuse and overdose epidemic in our state, and UTMC is responding with this dedicated unit as part of our increased focus on behavioral health. We want to help people in our community who suffer from addiction,” said Dr. Tanvir Singh, UTMC physiatrist who serves as the unit’s medical director. “Addiction is a brain disease just like any other chronic illness, but these patients also struggle with social stigma and marginalization, which makes it challenging. We need to both treat the disease and connect patients with the resources they need to overcome those challenges for successful recovery.”

Patients will be admitted to the detox unit through referrals from other units within UTMC and through health-care providers in the community, as well as patients and their family members who contact the hospital directly for detox assistance.

Patients must be in active withdrawal from alcohol, opioids or other substances when they are admitted to the UTMC detox unit and commit to immediately entering an intensive outpatient treatment program following their stay in the hospital, which would average three to five days.

UTMC also plans to include individual talk therapy, group therapy, social work visits, physical exercise, mental exercise, and nutrition and self-care classes with community partners as part of its services in the detox unit to address the patients’ medical and psychological needs.

For more information, call 419.383.2337.

New class to be inducted into Global Medical Missions Hall of Fame

The University of Toledo College of Medicine and Life Science’s Global Medical Missions Hall of Fame will induct a new class of honorees Saturday, April 1.

The Galilee Medical Center, Dr. Donald C. Mullen and Dr. Vadrevu (V.K.) Raju will be honored during the program in Collier Building Room 1000 on UT’s Health Science Campus beginning at 7:30 p.m.

“People to People Medicine” is the vision of the Galilee Medical Center, which is a national center of excellence and represents the highest ethical principles and humane values, reaching beyond the sectarian religious and ethnic hatreds that bloody most of the Middle East. Syria, racked by its own civil war, continues to maintain its decades old war with its southern neighbor, Israel, while actively supporting continuing terror against the Jewish state.

The Israeli hospital and its multi-religious and ethnic staff are a few kilometers from the northern border with Syria and accepts the war wounded and civilian personnel who are secretly spirited across the border from the devastating conflict in Syria seeking and receiving care.

Mullen

For the past 30 years, Dr. Donald Mullen has devoted his life to working in developing countries around the world. Born in Charlotte, N.C., he graduated from the Citadel in 1957 and received a medical degree and completed his residency at Duke University in 1969. After 20 years as a successful cardiovascular surgeon in Charlotte and Milwaukee who performed more than 3,000 open-heart procedures and many thousands of thoracic and vascular surgeries, he obtained a master of divinity at Princeton Theological Seminary and was ordained in the Presbyterian Church (USA) in 1991.

In 1980, Mullen received a call from the World Medical Mission to go to Tenwek Hospital in Kenya for a month, and his life has not been the same since. He made a radical change of direction in his life, working throughout the world as a dedicated medical missionary. He has worked for the Presbyterian Church (USA), Samaritans Purse International Relief, the Christian Medical and Dental Association, and as chairman of the board of the Philadelphia International Foundation. He has worked in three war zones; twice in Iraq and in Sudan and Rwanda, and in Africa, the Far East and the Middle East.

Mullen concluded his career as a parish associate in Highland, N.C., where he also was elected mayor. He has recently published a book of his life, “A Radical Change of Direction; Memoir of the Spiritual Journey of a Surgeon.”

Raju

For the past four decades, Dr. Vadrevu (V.K.) Raju has been on a crusade to eliminate avoidable blindness in parts of the world plagued by poverty and poor access to medical care. Born in India, he earned a medical degree from Andrah University and completed an ophthalmology residency and fellowship at the Royal Eye Group of Hospitals in London. He is board-certified in ophthalmology and is a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons and the American College of Surgeons. He is a clinical professor at West Virginia University, the section chief of the Ophthalmology Department at Monongalia General Hospital, and runs a private practice.

Raju is the founder and medical director of the Eye Foundation of America. World-class state-of-the art services are rendered through traveling eye camps and permanent brick-and-motor hospitals built by the foundation, including the Goutami Eye Institute that Raju helped found in 2006. Since the inception of the Eye Foundation of America, these camps and institutes have facilitated more than 600 physician exchanges, trained more than 200 ophthalmologists, served 2 million patients, and performed 300,000 vision-saving surgeries in 21 countries operating on three guiding principles: service, teaching and research.

In children, the main focus of efforts by the Eye Foundation of America, the gift of sight results in 75 years of a full and productive life. No child will be denied treatment, and children from around the world can come to receive world-class services. Raju has said, “If blindness is preventable, then let us do it big.”

In addition, Drs. Anne and Randall Ruch, will receive the Lawrence V. Conway Distinguished Lifetime Service Award, and the UT College of Medicine and Life Sciences Alumni Community Award will be given to Dr. David Grossman.

Randall and Anne Ruch

Since 1998, the Ruchs have led short-term mission trips to Guatemala after witnessing the deplorable conditions of the people living in a garbage dump and promising them that they would make a difference in their community. Nine years later, SewHope, their nonprofit organization was formed that signifies the hope of Shannon E. Wilson, a young physician who had an abounding compassion for the people of Guatemala, who died in 2006 before her dreams could be fulfilled. SewHope provides health care, nutrition, education, spiritual growth and opportunity to marginalized people in one of the most neglected parts of the world. The couple’s altruistic mission also led them to form a local nonprofit organization, Compassion Health Toledo, so they could address the health-care shortage in a medically under-served area of Toledo.

Grossman

Grossman graduated in 1974 from the former Medical College of Ohio and completed an internship, residency and fellowship there in 1978. He began his medical career as a member of the medical staff at Toledo and St. Vincent’s hospitals and in an internal medicine group practice. In 1989, he began his public career working for the city of Toledo’s Board of Health, was Toledo’s health commissioner and then medical director. Grossman was instrumental in the merger of the county and city health departments, and in 2000, he became the health commissioner of the combined Toledo-Lucas County Health Department, a position that he held for 16 years. Grossman was successful in the passage of the statewide smoking ban, and in 2007, he was awarded the Public Health Guardian Award by the Association of Ohio Health Commissioners, which gives recognition to outstanding and significant activities resulting in a positive impact on public health for his work on the smoking ban hearings.

In conjunction with the induction, the College of Medicine Students for Medical Missions will host a symposium, “Together, We Are the Change in Medicine,” Saturday, April 1, from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in Health Education Building 110. Speakers will include Mullen, Raju and the Ruchs.

Dr. Lawrence V. Conway, UT professor emeritus of finance, founded the Global Medical Missions Hall of Fame in 2004 to honor individuals and organizations that have made significant contributions to advancing the medical well-being of people around the world. In 2006, the Global Medical Missions Hall of Fame became affiliated with the UT College of Medicine and Life Sciences. The hall of fame can be seen in the lobby of the Jacobs Interprofessional Immersive Simulation Center.

RSVPs are requested for the free, public event: Call 419.530.2586 or 1.800.235.6766, or email medmissionhof@utoledo.edu.