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Match Day brings excitement, life changes to UT medical students

Congratulatory cheers, hugs and tears were on full display at the annual Match Day celebration, when the next generation of physicians opened envelopes that revealed their residency placements.

“Match Day is a pivotal moment in the lives of medical students,” Dr. Christopher Cooper, dean of the UT College of Medicine and Life Sciences, and executive vice president for clinical affairs, said. “Our students work tirelessly during their medical school career to reach this point. It is humbling to witness this day and experience the excitement of our students when they open their envelopes.”

Christina Camick was matched to her top choice, UT, in general surgery.

Retaining top talent in the area continues to trend in a positive direction with 10 percent of the 156 fourth-year medical students graduating in May staying in northwest Ohio to continue their training.

Christina Camick matched to UT for her residency in general surgery, her top choice.

“I woke up a little nervous, but excited,” Camick said. “Toledo is a strong program, and I knew if it was meant to be it would work out. The faculty members are outstanding. They are approachable and knowledgeable. I am very excited.”

Grace Maltbie will go to Case Western/University Hospitals close to her parents where she will be a resident in the radiology department.

“I really enjoyed radiology and would be able to spend more time with my daughter,” said Maltbie, who attended the event with her daughter in matching outfits. “I am a single mom and have been dreaming of this day. Whenever things would get hard, I would just think about Match Day and being here with my daughter. It means a lot.”

Grace Anne Maltbie and her 3-year old daughter, Anna Maria, celebrated her match to Case Western/University Hospitals.

Mike Maltbie, Grace’s father, was particularly excited with his daughter’s placement.

“I work at Case Western Reserve University doing information security, so I will be able to walk to a Starbucks and bring my daughter coffee after she’s had a long shift,” he said.

In addition to getting matched to the University of Pittsburgh in obstetrics and gynecology, Latima Collins also personally “matched” to her significant other when she became engaged at Match Day.

“I am excited because I matched and I got engaged to the love of my life,” Collins said. “I am in shock! I am on cloud nine and thank God for everything that has happened today.”

UT medical students matched to institutions across the country; these included Yale New Haven Hospital, Massachusetts General Hospital and Duke University Medical Center.

Latima Collins celebrated her match to the University of Pittsburgh and her engagement to Andrew Anamanya, who waited to pop the question at the ceremony.

This year, students matched into 23 specialties, with 71, or 46 percent, in primary care fields, and 50, or 31 percent, entering other specialties. The top specialties for this graduating class were internal medicine, pediatrics, emergency medicine and anesthesiology.
Ohio was the most popular state with 61 students matching here. The second most popular state was Michigan with 19, followed by Pennsylvania with12. Overall, students matched with programs in 29 states.

Global Medical Missions Hall of Fame induction ceremony set for March 17

The University of Toledo College of Medicine and Life Science’s Global Medical Missions Hall of Fame will induct a new class of honorees Saturday, March 17.

Inductees will be recognized during a ceremony at 7:30 p.m. in Collier Building Room 1000 on UT’s Health Science Campus.

Members of the 2018 class are:


• Dr. Diane Cappelletty, professor and chair of pharmacy practice in the UT College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. The Monclova, Ohio, resident has been involved with medical missions and local medical clinics for 15 years.

Her mission work began in 2003 when she went with a team to Peru. Since then, Cappelletty has been on numerous missions to Guatemala and Honduras, and has inspired students to serve alongside her. She compounds medications in the field, comes up with innovative techniques to provide meds during the missions, and mentors students, showing them the humanistic side of pharmacists in trying conditions. Her work has been recognized by the Ohio Society of Health System Pharmacists.

In Toledo, Cappelletty volunteers at the free Community Care Clinic, which, thanks to her efforts, was licensed by the Ohio State Board of Pharmacy.

A UT alumna, she received a bachelor of arts degree in biology from the University in 1982. Cappelletty continued her education at Ohio State University and received a bachelor of science degree in pharmacy and doctor of pharmacy in 1991 and 1993, respectively.


• Dr. Ziya Celik, a surgeon who has participated in missions for more than three decades. He has worked with Midwest Medical Missions, Medishare and Medecins Sans Frontieres/Doctors Without Boarders, serving in the Dominican Republic, Kenya, Haiti and Nigeria.

Born in 1941 in Rize, Turkey, Celik moved to the city of Erzurum to complete his early education. In 1960, he started medical school at the University of Istanbul, completed a surgery residency, and was an instructor at the University of Ataturk in Erzurum until 1971. A research fellowship followed in 1972 at the University of Boston, where he was selected for a position. In 1976, he completed a residency in general surgery at the former Medical College of Ohio.

In addition to medical missions and earthquake relief, Celik maintained a general surgery private practice in Oregon, Ohio, for 30 years, retiring in 2006. Affiliated with St. Charles Hospital, he was a 20-year member of its executive committee, director of surgery for 10 years, and chief of staff while volunteering his surgical skills around the globe. He lives in Pompano Beach, Fla.

• International Samaritan, a ministry based in Ann Arbor, Mich. For nearly two decades, this nonprofit organization has established programs to alleviate severe poverty and health issues in numerous countries.

In 1994, the Rev. Donald Vettese, a Jesuit priest who was then president of St. John’s Jesuit High School in Toledo, founded this ministry after a trip with students to an orphanage in Guatemala City. He and his students took a detour and stopped beside a garbage dump where the scene seemed like a nightmare: Droves of people scavenging through trash, searching for plastic, glass, metal and other materials to sell to recyclers. After talking with the students and the mayor of Guatemala City, Vettese agreed they would work together to help improve the plight of garbage workers and others living near the dump. In 1995, Vettese was able to incorporate the not-for-profit, originally calling it Central American Ministries, but renaming it International Samaritan in 2009 to reflect the growing global outreach.

In 16 years, the ministry has started programs in Guatemala, Egypt, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama and Haiti. The organization also is conducting feasibility studies for similar efforts in Ethiopia, Sierra Leone and the Philippines. Each year it serves more than 13,000 people.

Oscar Dussan, president of International Samaritan, will attend the ceremony to accept the award.


In addition, Dr. Andrew Casabianca, associate professor and chair of anesthesiology in the UT College of Medicine and Life Sciences, and medical director of operative services at UT Medical Center, will receive the Dr. Lawrence V. Conway Lifetime Distinguished Service Award. He also is associate professor of surgery and dentistry.

Since traveling to the Dominican Republic on his first medical mission trip in 1994, Casabianca has returned every year. A member of the Midwest Medical Missions, he has participated in more than 30 trips, conducting primary care, anesthesia and dentistry. Casabianca has been the faculty adviser for UT Students for Medical Missions and is on the missions committee at Calvary Church in Maumee. He also was on the planning committee for Serve Week, participated in medical clinics for Vision Ministries and Convoy of Hope, and is a board member for Midwest Medical Missions.

Casabianca completed his undergraduate education at New York University and received a doctor of medicine in dentistry degree from the University of Pennsylvania in 1979. He graduated from the former Medical College of Ohio with his medical degree in 1988, and completed his dental residency at St. Vincent’s Hospital, a transitional internship at Mercy Hospital, and an anesthesiology residency at the former MCO.

In conjunction with the induction ceremony, the College of Medicine Students for Medical Missions will host a free symposium Saturday, March 17, from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in Health Education Building 110. Speakers will include Cappelletty, Celik, Dussan and Casabianca. Register for the free symposium here.

Dr. Lawrence V. Conway, UT professor emeritus of finance, founded the Global Medical Missions Hall of Fame in 2004 to honor individuals and organizations that have made significant contributions to advancing the medical well-being of people around the world. In 2006, the Global Medical Missions Hall of Fame became affiliated with the UT College of Medicine and Life Sciences. The hall of fame can be seen in the lobby of the Jacobs Interprofessional Immersive Simulation Center.

RSVPs are requested for the free, public induction ceremony: Call 419.530.2586 or 1.800.235.6766, register online at toledoalumni.org/events/events.aspx?eid=753 or email medmissionhof@utoledo.edu.

Match Day: UT medical students to learn residency placements March 16

On Match Day, thousands of graduating medical students across the country will open at noon Friday, March 16, the envelopes that contain their residency placements.

Fourth-year medical students at The University of Toledo will gather at Stranahan Theater’s Great Hall for Match Day to learn where they will spend the next three to seven years training in their chosen specialty.

The 2018 Residency Match Reception will begin at 11 a.m. with the envelope-opening ceremony precisely at noon. This event is invitation-only because space is limited.

Students spend months interviewing at hospitals and universities across the nation to find the institutions that will best help them perfect their chosen specialties. The students then rank their top choices, and academic and community-based medical centers nationwide rank their top student choices.

A computer algorithm administered by the National Resident Matching Program then “matches” students and residency programs together.

Residents are licensed physicians who care for patients under the supervision of attending physicians and represent the medical workforce of tomorrow.

UT’s Got Talent to raise funds for UTMC resident legacy scholarship

Singing, dancing and musical performances by students and faculty of The University of Toledo College of Medicine and Life Sciences will be featured at the UT’s Got Talent event Friday, March 9.

“The talent show is a fun way to come together to showcase the hidden talents of students and faculty members,” said Taylor Branstool, second-year medical student and secretary for the Medical Student Council, which coordinates the annual event.

The show will be held at 7 p.m. in Doermann Theatre in University Hall. Proceeds from ticket and raffle sales will be donated to support a scholarship fund in memory of a UTMC surgical resident.

“This year we’ve again chosen to honor the life of Dr. Cyrus Chan, a surgery resident at UTMC who lost his life too soon,” Branstool said. “It should be an entertaining night to help get some good out of such a tragedy.”

The show will be hosted by Dr. Maurice Manning, Distinguished University Professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Cancer Biology.

Tickets are $5 and will be sold in advance in the Health Education Building Lobby this week from noon to 1 p.m. daily throughout the week and at the door.

UT researchers to lead 38% of Ohio’s new water quality research projects, including ‘impairment’ criteria

The University of Toledo is slated to lead eight out of the 21 new research projects to be funded with $3.5 million from the state of Ohio to address water quality and algal bloom toxicity.

UT, situated on the western basin of Lake Erie, is to receive nearly $1 million of the $3.5 million dedicated by the Ohio Department of Higher Education for these additional projects in the ongoing, statewide Harmful Algal Bloom Research Initiative, which began three years ago after the city of Toledo issued a Do Not Drink advisory for half a million water customers due to the level of microcystin detected in the water.

Dr. Tom Bridgeman, UT algae researcher and professor of ecology, examines a water sample aboard the UT Lake Erie Center research vessel.

UT is one of the lead universities in the Harmful Algal Bloom Research Initiative, which consists of 10 Ohio universities and five state agencies.

The selected projects focus on reducing nutrient loading to Lake Erie; investigating algal toxin formation and human health impacts; studying bloom dynamics; better informing water treatment plants how to remove toxin; and aiding the efforts of state agencies.

Dr. Tom Bridgeman, professor in the Department of Environmental Sciences, will lead a project to develop sampling protocols and collect samples to assess listing criteria that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency may use to monitor the water quality of the open waters of the western basin of Lake Erie and to potentially assign official designations such as “impaired” or “unimpaired.”

“Although it is obvious to nearly everyone that harmful algal blooms are impairing Lake Erie each summer, we need to develop objective scientific criteria that can be used to list the open waters of the lake as officially ‘impaired,’ and to remove an ‘impairment’ designation in the future if conditions improve sufficiently,” Bridgeman said.

UT researchers also to receive some of the $988,829 in state funding for their projects are:

• Dr. Jason Huntley, associate professor in the Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, will be developing and testing biofilters — water filters containing specialized bacteria that degrade microcystin toxins from lake water as it flows through the filter. These biofilter studies are aimed to develop cost-effective, efficient and safe drinking water treatment alternatives for the city of Toledo and other Lake Erie water municipalities.

• Dr. Steven Haller and Dr. David Kennedy, assistant professors in the Department of Medicine, will investigate how cyanotoxins such as microcystin damage organs not only in healthy settings, but in settings that may increase susceptibility such as diabetes, obesity and inflammatory bowel disease. Their research teams are working in concert with experts in medicine, pathology, physiology, pharmacology and chemistry to not only learn how microcystin affects organ function in these settings, but also to create new therapies to prevent and treat organ damage, especially in vulnerable patient populations.

• Dr. Patrick Lawrence, UT professor in the Department of Geography and Planning, will use a transportation model to simulate potential distribution of volume of agricultural manure from permitted livestock facilities to surrounding farmland for application as a nutrient. The results will assist in determining the estimated acreage of land within the Lake Erie western basin where manure application could be undertaken and examine associated crop types, farming practices, soil types, drainage and other environmental conditions in those areas.

• Dr. Saatvika Rai, assistant professor of environmental policy in the Department of Political Science and Public Administration, and Dr. Kevin Czajkowski, professor in the Department of Geography and Planning, will use GIS and remote sensing to assess the implementation of agricultural and farming practices in three sub-watersheds of the Maumee River Basin — Auglaize, Blanchard and St. Joseph — to identify where best management practices are being implemented. These maps will then be correlated with perceptions of farmers through surveys and interviews to identify hotspots and priority areas for policy intervention in the region.

• Dr. April Ames, assistant professor in the College of Health and Human Services, will apply an industrial hygiene technique to the exploration of the presence of microcystin in the air using research boats on Lake Erie. Simultaneously, residents who live on or near Lake Erie will be surveyed about their recreational use and self-reported health.

“I am proud of the work that is being done, and that researchers from our public and private higher education institutions continue to work together to address this issue,” said Ohio Department of Higher Education Chancellor John Carey. “Using the talent of Ohio’s researchers and students to solve pressing problems makes perfect sense.”

The Harmful Algal Bloom Research Initiative is funded by the Ohio Department of Higher Education with $7.1 million made available for four rounds of research funding since 2015. Matching funding from participating Ohio universities increases the total investment to almost $15.5 million for more than 50 projects, demonstrating the state’s overall commitment to solving the harmful algal bloom problem.

Water quality is a major research focus at UT. With more than $14 million in active grants underway, UT experts are studying algal blooms, invasive species such as Asian carp, and pollutants. Researchers are looking for pathways to restore our greatest natural resource for future generations to ensure our communities continue to have access to safe drinking water.

The UT Water Task Force, which is composed of faculty and researchers in diverse fields spanning the University, serves as a resource for government officials and the public looking for expertise on investigating the causes and effects of algal blooms, the health of Lake Erie, and the health of the communities depending on its water. The task force includes experts in economics, engineering, environmental sciences, business, pharmacy, law, chemistry and biochemistry, geography and planning, and medical microbiology and immunology.

UT College of Medicine, ProMedica to launch new joint Neurosciences Center

The University of Toledo College of Medicine and Life Sciences and ProMedica are collaborating on a joint Neurosciences Center that will advance education, research and care for patients with neurological disorders.

Set to open in April, the new facility is a state-of-the-art, three-story, 122,000-square-foot building on the north campus of ProMedica Toledo Hospital. It features academic facilities for students, residents and faculty, as well as centralized services for neurology and neurosurgery, including physician clinics, radiology, diagnostics, rehabilitation therapy and a research clinic.

The joint Neurosciences Center, shown in this rendering, is scheduled to open in April.

The innovative partnership, which is an expansion of the Academic Affiliation between the University and ProMedica, will bring together UT faculty, physicians and researchers with ProMedica physicians in a single location to improve the quality of life for people living with disorders of the brain, spine, nerves and muscles.

The direct interaction between scientific researchers and clinical staff will provide patients the latest and most promising treatments for their conditions and provide students, residents and fellows a wide variety of experiences to enhance their education in an interdisciplinary setting. The joint Neurosciences Center will advance treatment for common disorders, including stroke; epilepsy; headache; movement disorders such as Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and other dementias; multiple sclerosis; and vestibular disorders that cause dizziness.

The center will be led by UT’s Dr. Gretchen Tietjen, Clair Martig Chair and Distinguished Professor of Neurology, and ProMedica’s Darrin Arquette, senior vice president for Neurosciences, Heart and Orthopaedics Institutes at ProMedica.

The joint Neurosciences Center builds on successful previous collaboration between UT and ProMedica to create a comprehensive stroke program in the region that provides lifesaving interventional therapies for patients with acute stroke and non-surgical treatment of brain aneurysms.

Pediatrician to reflect on career, life during Feb. 16 lecture

Dr. Fadia Abaza, UT alumna and retired pediatrician, will give the Medical Student Council’s 10th Annual Litzinger Legacy Lecture Friday, Feb. 16.

She will speak on “Three Worlds, Three Countries, Endless Lessons” from 5 to 7 p.m. in Health Education Building Room 110 on Health Science Campus.

Abaza received her medical degree from Damascus University Faculty of Medicine and completed a residency in pediatrics at the former Medical College of Ohio. She practiced in Maumee.

The event is an opportunity for a distinguished faculty member or graduate to share her or his reflections on career, service and life with students and other members of the College of Medicine and Life Sciences’ community.

Food will be served during Abaza’s talk.

The Legacy Lecture series is inspired by the book titled “The Last Lecture” by Randy Pausch and is named in honor of Amie Litzinger, a 2013 alumna of the UT College of Medicine, who was integral in its formation.

‘Renaissance Art as Medicine’ topic of lecture at exhibit opening

The 13th Annual Health Science Campus Artist Showcase is on display through Monday, April 2, on the fourth floor of Mulford Library.

This year’s exhibit features works by 30 artists — students, faculty and staff in the health sciences from both Health Science and Main campuses, as well as The University of Toledo Medical Center.

“Eastern Michigan University, Livonia,” photography, by Dr. Andrew Beavis, professor of physiology and pharmacology, is among the works featured in the Health Science Campus Artist Showcase.

On display will be a variety of 2-D and 3-D artwork, including paintings, drawings, photography, sculpture and mixed media.

An opening reception will be held Friday, Feb. 16, from 4 to 6 p.m. on the fourth floor of Mulford Library. Dr. Allie Terry-Fritsch, associate professor of Italian Renaissance art history at Bowling Green State University, will give a lecture titled “Renaissance Art as Medicine” at 4:30 p.m.

Terry-Fritsch’s research, which has been published widely in journals and books, focuses on the experiences of viewing art and architecture during the early modern period with an emphasis on 15th-century Florence.

Light refreshments from Caffeini’s will be served during the free, public reception and lecture.

For details, click here or contact Jodi Jameson, assistant professor and nursing librarian at Mulford Library, who is a member of the artist showcase committee, at 419.383.5152 or jodi.jameson@utoledo.edu.

“Allée du Chien, Castlefranc, France,” charcoal drawing, by Dr. Paul Brand
associate professor emeritus of physiology and pharmacology, also is featured in the exhibit.

Saturday Morning Science returns with ‘Twisty Puzzles,’ ‘Green Goo,’ ‘Talking Trees’

If you’re curious about solving the Rubik’s Cube or the break of a pitcher’s curve ball, ask a mathematician or scientist.

Saturday Morning Science is back for 2018 at The University of Toledo with six programs to give the community the opportunity to learn about hot topics in modern science.

The free, public talks are presented by the UT College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics and kick off Saturday, Feb. 3, at 10 a.m. in Memorial Field House Room 2100 with “A Brief History of Twisty Puzzles,” most famously the Rubik’s Cube.

“Puzzles are more important than most people realize,” said Dr. Nathaniel Iverson, lecturer in the UT Department of Mathematics and Statistics, who will lead the session and teach strategies to solve a Rubik’s Cube.

“Mathematics is not just about numbers and calculations, but also about analyzing the world around you and solving problems. Puzzles are valuable for developing dexterity, problem-solving strategies, spatial reasoning, refinement of practice techniques, and intuition for higher-level concepts in mathematics.”

A limited number of custom UT/Saturday Morning Science cube puzzles will be given away to attendees of the Feb. 3 presentation.

Listed by date, additional programs and speakers are:

• Feb. 17 — “Bio-Inspired, Bio-Hybrid, and Organic Robots: The Many Roles of Nature in Robotic Development” by Dr. Roger Quinn, director of the Biologically Inspired Robotics Laboratory at Case Western Reserve University, and Dr. Victoria Webster-Wood, postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Case Western Reserve University, in Memorial Field House Room 2100.

• Feb. 24 — “From Fork to Fauna: Unlocking the Secrets of Nutrition to Optimize Our Health” by Sally Itawi and Manish Karamchandani, medical students in the UT College of Medicine and Life Sciences, in Wolfe Hall Room 1205.

• March 17 — “Talking Trees and Babbling Bushes: How Plants Communicate with Each Other” by Dr. Jack C. Schultz, senior executive director of research development at UT and director emeritus of the Bond Life Sciences Center at the University of Missouri, in Wolfe Hall Room 1205.

• April 21 — “The Great Green Goo of Lake Erie: Harmful Algal Blooms and Your Drinking Water” by Dr. Tom Bridgeman, UT professor of ecology in the Department of Environmental Sciences, in Memorial Field House Room 2100.

• April 28 — “The Physics of Baseball” by Dr. Alan Nathan, professor emeritus at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, in Memorial Field House Room 2100.

“One theme running through this year’s series is our relationship with nature,” said Dr. John Bellizzi, UT associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry, and co-director of Saturday Morning Science. “We’re connected to the environment through the food we eat and the water we drink, and we can also draw inspiration from understanding how animals move and plants communicate.”

All talks begin at 10 a.m. and include complimentary light refreshments.

For more information about the upcoming events, visit facebook.com/saturdaymorningscience.

Accreditation reinstated for Physician Assistant Program

The University of Toledo successfully appealed the withdrawal of accreditation from the Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant (ARC-PA) for the Physician Assistant Studies Program.

In a letter to UT President Sharon L. Gaber sent Jan. 22, ARC-PA notified the University it reconsidered its Oct. 6 decision to withdraw accreditation and “instead has decided to keep the program on accreditation-probation” status.

“The ARC-PA decided to keep the program on probation in order to protect the interests of current students and because the ARC-PA determined the program appears to have sufficient resources in place to resolve the citations in a timely manner,” the letter states.

During the probation period, the University will continue efforts to enhance the quality of the PA program.

In a letter to campus, Gaber wrote, “This is good news, particularly for our students, whose success is our top priority.”

She added, “The accreditation process has always served as an opportunity for us to improve on our processes and programs. We will continue to strive to provide the highest quality educational experience for our PA students with unwavering commitment.”