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Football legend, technology expert to speak at UT commencement ceremonies

Chuck Ealey and Dr. Helen Sun will return to The University of Toledo to give addresses during spring commencement ceremonies Saturday, May 5, in the Glass Bowl.

Ealey, the football star and businessman, will speak at the undergraduate ceremony at 10 a.m. Sun, a technology strategist known for transforming companies, will come out for the graduate commencement at 3 p.m.

There are 3,094 candidates for degrees from the colleges of Arts and Letters; Business and Innovation; Judith Herb College of Education; Engineering; Health and Human Services; Graduate Studies; Natural Sciences and Mathematics; Nursing; Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences; and University College. There are 987 candidates for doctoral, education specialist and master’s degrees, as well as graduate certificates, and 2,107 for bachelor’s and associate’s degrees.

The public ceremonies can be viewed live at utoledo.edu/video.

Ealey

UT will award Ealey an honorary doctor of humane letters.

“It is amazing, wonderful and humbling to have the opportunity to speak to the 2018 graduates of The University of Toledo,” Ealey said. “What I want to share is what I have learned — and am still learning — after I graduated. It’s about a legacy dream that can come true.”

He made dreams a reality as the UT quarterback who became a legend leading the Rockets to 35 victories in three seasons and as a trailblazer for African-American QBs in the Canadian Football League.

After finishing 18-0 in high school in Portsmouth, Ohio, Ealey received a football scholarship to the University. While earning a business degree in economics, he earned some nicknames for his exploits on the field: Mr. Cool, The Wizard of Oohs and Aahs. With Ealey at quarterback, Toledo went 35-0 from 1969 to 1971. He racked up 5,903 yards in total offense and 54 touchdowns while leading the Rockets to final Associated Press rankings of No. 20 in 1969, No. 12 in 1970, and No. 14 in 1971, finishing eighth in the Heisman Trophy voting his senior year.

Despite the eye-popping numbers, Ealey was passed over as a quarterback in the 1972 NFL draft. Although offered other positions, he was committed to becoming a professional quarterback and elected to go to the Canadian Football League. As a rookie, he led the Hamilton Tiger-Cats to the Grey Cup Championship in 1972 and was named Most Valuable Player. During his seven years in the CFL, he also played for the Toronto Argonauts and the Winnipeg Blue Bombers.

After hanging up his helmet, Ealey was a certified financial planner with Investors Group for 30 years. He recently stepped out of his role as regional director to do more client and corporate coaching. The 1972 UT alumnus also inspires through the Chuck Ealey Foundation, which helps people discover and embrace their undefeated spirit to better themselves and their community.

Sun

Sun, chief technology officer of architecture, engineering and data management at JPMorgan Chase & Co. in Chicago, received a PhD in educational technology from UT in 2001. She is an expert in revolutionizing businesses through innovative solutions, including artificial intelligence, cloud, analytics and architecture.

“I’m very excited to be coming back to campus and reflect on how my IT career took shape during the years I attended UT,” said Sun, who developed websites while in graduate school.

“I’ll wrap my speech around three personal experiences: How I started a career in technology — find where your passion lies; how my seemingly diverse career path has taken me to where I am — take risks and never let fear of failure deter you away from opportunities; and who my true hero is throughout these years — don’t let what others do to you change who you are,” she said.

Prior to joining JPMorgan Chase & Co., Sun was vice president for cloud computing, information and architecture at Motorola Solutions Inc. She has held senior leadership positions at some of the world’s most recognizable companies, including Harbor Capitol Advisors, NewEdge Group, Oracle Corp. and Salesforce.com Inc.

At Oracle, Sun became the first woman to achieve Oracle Enterprise Architect status and was honored as Oracle Enterprise Architect of the Year in 2011. In 2016, the Chicago Business Journal named her one of 50 honorees for its Women of Influence Awards.

She is the co-author of “Oracle Big Data Handbook,” “Pro Salesforce Analytics Cloud: A Guide to Wave Platform, Builder and Explorer” and “Master Competitive Analytics With Oracle Endeca Information Discovery.” Sun is a frequent speaker at major conferences and symposia; she gave the keynote address at the Open Group Big Data Conference in 2012 in Barcelona, Spain.

In addition to her passion serving as a mentor for women, Sun was a member of the UT Business Advisory Board from 2012 to 2016. She is co-chair of the Computer Science Advisory Board at Bowling Green State University.

Those planning to attend commencement are advised to use the west entrance off Secor Road and the south entrance off Dorr Street to avoid congestion on West Bancroft Street.

The College of Law will hold its commencement Sunday, May 6, at 1 p.m. in the Thompson Student Union Auditorium.

And the College of Medicine and Life Sciences’ graduation ceremony will take place Friday, May 25, at 2 p.m. in Stranahan Theater, 4645 Heatherdowns Blvd. in Toledo.

UT to host inaugural Lessons in LeadHERship Conference April 17

USA Today columnist Christine Brennan will be among the speakers for The University of Toledo women’s basketball program’s inaugural Lessons in LeadHERship Conference Tuesday, April 17.

The event will take place from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the Thompson Student Union.

The conference was designed to help grow female leadership in the Toledo community and is being sponsored by UT alumna Kelly Savage from Savage & Associates.

“I’m excited to kick off this annual leadership conference,” Toledo Head Women’s Basketball Coach Tricia Cullop said. “I hope any female in our community who wants to improve their leadership skill, no matter their age, will attend the conference. We have some outstanding speakers in various fields who have conquered many obstacles on their paths to success. I have no doubt this will be an inspiring day.”

Brennan’s talk is titled “Today is the Greatest Day to be a Woman in America: Until Tomorrow.” The Toledo native is an award-winning national columnist, commentator and best-selling author.

In addition to Brennan, Savage and Cullop, speakers for the one-day conference will include UT President Sharon L. Gaber; Tonya Rider, retired Toledo detective, who joined the Bowling Green State University Health and Human Services faculty; Chrys Peterson, leadership consultant and former news anchor; Dr. Clint Longenecker, Distinguished University Professor and director of the UT Center for Leadership and Organizational Excellence; Charlene Gilbert, dean of the UT College of Arts and Letters; and Dr. Stephanie Pannell, UT assistant professor of surgery, who specializes in colorectal surgery and surgical oncology.

Danielle Dwyer, WTOL sports anchor, will serve as the emcee.

The cost to attend is $50 per individual and $25 for high school and college students. The fee to attend also includes continental breakfast and lunch.

Attendees also can purchase a Layup Package ($250), which includes four tickets and name recognition throughout the event. Another possible option is a Free-Throw Package ($500), which includes eight tickets, name recognition throughout the event, and a booth with your company’s information. The final ticket option is a Three-Point Package ($1,000), which includes 16 tickets, name recognition throughout the event, and a booth with your company’s information.

For more information or to purchase tickets, contact Lauren Flaum, UT director of women’s basketball operations, at 419.530.2363 or email lauren.flaum2@utoledo.edu.

Match Day brings excitement, life changes to UT medical students

Congratulatory cheers, hugs and tears were on full display at the annual Match Day celebration, when the next generation of physicians opened envelopes that revealed their residency placements.

“Match Day is a pivotal moment in the lives of medical students,” Dr. Christopher Cooper, dean of the UT College of Medicine and Life Sciences, and executive vice president for clinical affairs, said. “Our students work tirelessly during their medical school career to reach this point. It is humbling to witness this day and experience the excitement of our students when they open their envelopes.”

Christina Camick was matched to her top choice, UT, in general surgery.

Retaining top talent in the area continues to trend in a positive direction with 10 percent of the 156 fourth-year medical students graduating in May staying in northwest Ohio to continue their training.

Christina Camick matched to UT for her residency in general surgery, her top choice.

“I woke up a little nervous, but excited,” Camick said. “Toledo is a strong program, and I knew if it was meant to be it would work out. The faculty members are outstanding. They are approachable and knowledgeable. I am very excited.”

Grace Maltbie will go to Case Western/University Hospitals close to her parents where she will be a resident in the radiology department.

“I really enjoyed radiology and would be able to spend more time with my daughter,” said Maltbie, who attended the event with her daughter in matching outfits. “I am a single mom and have been dreaming of this day. Whenever things would get hard, I would just think about Match Day and being here with my daughter. It means a lot.”

Grace Anne Maltbie and her 3-year old daughter, Anna Maria, celebrated her match to Case Western/University Hospitals.

Mike Maltbie, Grace’s father, was particularly excited with his daughter’s placement.

“I work at Case Western Reserve University doing information security, so I will be able to walk to a Starbucks and bring my daughter coffee after she’s had a long shift,” he said.

In addition to getting matched to the University of Pittsburgh in obstetrics and gynecology, Latima Collins also personally “matched” to her significant other when she became engaged at Match Day.

“I am excited because I matched and I got engaged to the love of my life,” Collins said. “I am in shock! I am on cloud nine and thank God for everything that has happened today.”

UT medical students matched to institutions across the country; these included Yale New Haven Hospital, Massachusetts General Hospital and Duke University Medical Center.

Latima Collins celebrated her match to the University of Pittsburgh and her engagement to Andrew Anamanya, who waited to pop the question at the ceremony.

This year, students matched into 23 specialties, with 71, or 46 percent, in primary care fields, and 50, or 31 percent, entering other specialties. The top specialties for this graduating class were internal medicine, pediatrics, emergency medicine and anesthesiology.
Ohio was the most popular state with 61 students matching here. The second most popular state was Michigan with 19, followed by Pennsylvania with12. Overall, students matched with programs in 29 states.

Global Medical Missions Hall of Fame induction ceremony set for March 17

The University of Toledo College of Medicine and Life Sciences’ Global Medical Missions Hall of Fame will induct a new class of honorees Saturday, March 17.

Inductees will be recognized during a ceremony at 7:30 p.m. in Collier Building Room 1000 on UT’s Health Science Campus.

Members of the 2018 class are:

Cappelletty

• Dr. Diane Cappelletty, professor and chair of pharmacy practice in the UT College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. The Monclova, Ohio, resident has been involved with medical missions and local medical clinics for 15 years.

Her mission work began in 2003 when she went with a team to Peru. Since then, Cappelletty has been on numerous missions to Guatemala and Honduras, and has inspired students to serve alongside her. She compounds medications in the field, comes up with innovative techniques to provide meds during the missions, and mentors students, showing them the humanistic side of pharmacists in trying conditions. Her work has been recognized by the Ohio Society of Health System Pharmacists.

In Toledo, Cappelletty volunteers at the free Community Care Clinic, which, thanks to her efforts, was licensed by the Ohio State Board of Pharmacy.

A UT alumna, she received a bachelor of arts degree in biology from the University in 1982. Cappelletty continued her education at Ohio State University and received a bachelor of science degree in pharmacy and doctor of pharmacy in 1991 and 1993, respectively.

Celik

• Dr. Ziya Celik, a surgeon who has participated in missions for more than three decades. He has worked with Midwest Medical Missions, Medishare and Medecins Sans Frontieres/Doctors Without Boarders, serving in the Dominican Republic, Kenya, Haiti and Nigeria.

Born in 1941 in Rize, Turkey, Celik moved to the city of Erzurum to complete his early education. In 1960, he started medical school at the University of Istanbul, completed a surgery residency, and was an instructor at the University of Ataturk in Erzurum until 1971. A research fellowship followed in 1972 at the University of Boston, where he was selected for a position. In 1976, he completed a residency in general surgery at the former Medical College of Ohio.

In addition to medical missions and earthquake relief, Celik maintained a general surgery private practice in Oregon, Ohio, for 30 years, retiring in 2006. Affiliated with St. Charles Hospital, he was a 20-year member of its executive committee, director of surgery for 10 years, and chief of staff while volunteering his surgical skills around the globe. He lives in Pompano Beach, Fla.

• International Samaritan, a ministry based in Ann Arbor, Mich. For nearly two decades, this nonprofit organization has established programs to alleviate severe poverty and health issues in numerous countries.

In 1994, the Rev. Donald Vettese, a Jesuit priest who was then president of St. John’s Jesuit High School in Toledo, founded this ministry after a trip with students to an orphanage in Guatemala City. He and his students took a detour and stopped beside a garbage dump where the scene seemed like a nightmare: Droves of people scavenging through trash, searching for plastic, glass, metal and other materials to sell to recyclers. After talking with the students and the mayor of Guatemala City, Vettese agreed they would work together to help improve the plight of garbage workers and others living near the dump. In 1995, Vettese was able to incorporate the not-for-profit, originally calling it Central American Ministries, but renaming it International Samaritan in 2009 to reflect the growing global outreach.

In 16 years, the ministry has started programs in Guatemala, Egypt, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama and Haiti. The organization also is conducting feasibility studies for similar efforts in Ethiopia, Sierra Leone and the Philippines. Each year it serves more than 13,000 people.

Oscar Dussan, president of International Samaritan, will attend the ceremony to accept the award.

Casabianca

In addition, Dr. Andrew Casabianca, associate professor and chair of anesthesiology in the UT College of Medicine and Life Sciences, and medical director of operative services at UT Medical Center, will receive the Dr. Lawrence V. Conway Lifetime Distinguished Service Award. He also is associate professor of surgery and dentistry.

Since traveling to the Dominican Republic on his first medical mission trip in 1994, Casabianca has returned every year. A member of the Midwest Medical Missions, he has participated in more than 30 trips, conducting primary care, anesthesia and dentistry. Casabianca has been the faculty adviser for UT Students for Medical Missions and is on the missions committee at Calvary Church in Maumee. He also was on the planning committee for Serve Week, participated in medical clinics for Vision Ministries and Convoy of Hope, and is a board member for Midwest Medical Missions.

Casabianca completed his undergraduate education at New York University and received a doctor of medicine in dentistry degree from the University of Pennsylvania in 1979. He graduated from the former Medical College of Ohio with his medical degree in 1988, and completed his dental residency at St. Vincent’s Hospital, a transitional internship at Mercy Hospital, and an anesthesiology residency at the former MCO.

In conjunction with the induction ceremony, the College of Medicine Students for Medical Missions will host a free symposium Saturday, March 17, from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in Health Education Building 110. Speakers will include Cappelletty, Celik, Dussan and Casabianca. Register for the free symposium here.

Dr. Lawrence V. Conway, UT professor emeritus of finance, founded the Global Medical Missions Hall of Fame in 2004 to honor individuals and organizations that have made significant contributions to advancing the medical well-being of people around the world. In 2006, the Global Medical Missions Hall of Fame became affiliated with the UT College of Medicine and Life Sciences. The hall of fame can be seen in the lobby of the Jacobs Interprofessional Immersive Simulation Center.

RSVPs are requested for the free, public induction ceremony: Call 419.530.2586 or 1.800.235.6766, register online at toledoalumni.org/events/events.aspx?eid=753 or email medmissionhof@utoledo.edu.

Match Day: UT medical students to learn residency placements March 16

On Match Day, thousands of graduating medical students across the country will open at noon Friday, March 16, the envelopes that contain their residency placements.

Fourth-year medical students at The University of Toledo will gather at Stranahan Theater’s Great Hall for Match Day to learn where they will spend the next three to seven years training in their chosen specialty.

The 2018 Residency Match Reception will begin at 11 a.m. with the envelope-opening ceremony precisely at noon. This event is invitation-only because space is limited.

Students spend months interviewing at hospitals and universities across the nation to find the institutions that will best help them perfect their chosen specialties. The students then rank their top choices, and academic and community-based medical centers nationwide rank their top student choices.

A computer algorithm administered by the National Resident Matching Program then “matches” students and residency programs together.

Residents are licensed physicians who care for patients under the supervision of attending physicians and represent the medical workforce of tomorrow.

UT’s Got Talent to raise funds for UTMC resident legacy scholarship

Singing, dancing and musical performances by students and faculty of The University of Toledo College of Medicine and Life Sciences will be featured at the UT’s Got Talent event Friday, March 9.

“The talent show is a fun way to come together to showcase the hidden talents of students and faculty members,” said Taylor Branstool, second-year medical student and secretary for the Medical Student Council, which coordinates the annual event.

The show will be held at 7 p.m. in Doermann Theatre in University Hall. Proceeds from ticket and raffle sales will be donated to support a scholarship fund in memory of a UTMC surgical resident.

“This year we’ve again chosen to honor the life of Dr. Cyrus Chan, a surgery resident at UTMC who lost his life too soon,” Branstool said. “It should be an entertaining night to help get some good out of such a tragedy.”

The show will be hosted by Dr. Maurice Manning, Distinguished University Professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Cancer Biology.

Tickets are $5 and will be sold in advance in the Health Education Building Lobby this week from noon to 1 p.m. daily throughout the week and at the door.

UT researchers to lead 38% of Ohio’s new water quality research projects, including ‘impairment’ criteria

The University of Toledo is slated to lead eight out of the 21 new research projects to be funded with $3.5 million from the state of Ohio to address water quality and algal bloom toxicity.

UT, situated on the western basin of Lake Erie, is to receive nearly $1 million of the $3.5 million dedicated by the Ohio Department of Higher Education for these additional projects in the ongoing, statewide Harmful Algal Bloom Research Initiative, which began three years ago after the city of Toledo issued a Do Not Drink advisory for half a million water customers due to the level of microcystin detected in the water.

Dr. Tom Bridgeman, UT algae researcher and professor of ecology, examines a water sample aboard the UT Lake Erie Center research vessel.

UT is one of the lead universities in the Harmful Algal Bloom Research Initiative, which consists of 10 Ohio universities and five state agencies.

The selected projects focus on reducing nutrient loading to Lake Erie; investigating algal toxin formation and human health impacts; studying bloom dynamics; better informing water treatment plants how to remove toxin; and aiding the efforts of state agencies.

Dr. Tom Bridgeman, professor in the Department of Environmental Sciences, will lead a project to develop sampling protocols and collect samples to assess listing criteria that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency may use to monitor the water quality of the open waters of the western basin of Lake Erie and to potentially assign official designations such as “impaired” or “unimpaired.”

“Although it is obvious to nearly everyone that harmful algal blooms are impairing Lake Erie each summer, we need to develop objective scientific criteria that can be used to list the open waters of the lake as officially ‘impaired,’ and to remove an ‘impairment’ designation in the future if conditions improve sufficiently,” Bridgeman said.

UT researchers also to receive some of the $988,829 in state funding for their projects are:

• Dr. Jason Huntley, associate professor in the Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, will be developing and testing biofilters — water filters containing specialized bacteria that degrade microcystin toxins from lake water as it flows through the filter. These biofilter studies are aimed to develop cost-effective, efficient and safe drinking water treatment alternatives for the city of Toledo and other Lake Erie water municipalities.

• Dr. Steven Haller and Dr. David Kennedy, assistant professors in the Department of Medicine, will investigate how cyanotoxins such as microcystin damage organs not only in healthy settings, but in settings that may increase susceptibility such as diabetes, obesity and inflammatory bowel disease. Their research teams are working in concert with experts in medicine, pathology, physiology, pharmacology and chemistry to not only learn how microcystin affects organ function in these settings, but also to create new therapies to prevent and treat organ damage, especially in vulnerable patient populations.

• Dr. Patrick Lawrence, UT professor in the Department of Geography and Planning, will use a transportation model to simulate potential distribution of volume of agricultural manure from permitted livestock facilities to surrounding farmland for application as a nutrient. The results will assist in determining the estimated acreage of land within the Lake Erie western basin where manure application could be undertaken and examine associated crop types, farming practices, soil types, drainage and other environmental conditions in those areas.

• Dr. Saatvika Rai, assistant professor of environmental policy in the Department of Political Science and Public Administration, and Dr. Kevin Czajkowski, professor in the Department of Geography and Planning, will use GIS and remote sensing to assess the implementation of agricultural and farming practices in three sub-watersheds of the Maumee River Basin — Auglaize, Blanchard and St. Joseph — to identify where best management practices are being implemented. These maps will then be correlated with perceptions of farmers through surveys and interviews to identify hotspots and priority areas for policy intervention in the region.

• Dr. April Ames, assistant professor in the College of Health and Human Services, will apply an industrial hygiene technique to the exploration of the presence of microcystin in the air using research boats on Lake Erie. Simultaneously, residents who live on or near Lake Erie will be surveyed about their recreational use and self-reported health.

“I am proud of the work that is being done, and that researchers from our public and private higher education institutions continue to work together to address this issue,” said Ohio Department of Higher Education Chancellor John Carey. “Using the talent of Ohio’s researchers and students to solve pressing problems makes perfect sense.”

The Harmful Algal Bloom Research Initiative is funded by the Ohio Department of Higher Education with $7.1 million made available for four rounds of research funding since 2015. Matching funding from participating Ohio universities increases the total investment to almost $15.5 million for more than 50 projects, demonstrating the state’s overall commitment to solving the harmful algal bloom problem.

Water quality is a major research focus at UT. With more than $14 million in active grants underway, UT experts are studying algal blooms, invasive species such as Asian carp, and pollutants. Researchers are looking for pathways to restore our greatest natural resource for future generations to ensure our communities continue to have access to safe drinking water.

The UT Water Task Force, which is composed of faculty and researchers in diverse fields spanning the University, serves as a resource for government officials and the public looking for expertise on investigating the causes and effects of algal blooms, the health of Lake Erie, and the health of the communities depending on its water. The task force includes experts in economics, engineering, environmental sciences, business, pharmacy, law, chemistry and biochemistry, geography and planning, and medical microbiology and immunology.

UT College of Medicine, ProMedica to launch new joint Neurosciences Center

The University of Toledo College of Medicine and Life Sciences and ProMedica are collaborating on a joint Neurosciences Center that will advance education, research and care for patients with neurological disorders.

Set to open in April, the new facility is a state-of-the-art, three-story, 122,000-square-foot building on the north campus of ProMedica Toledo Hospital. It features academic facilities for students, residents and faculty, as well as centralized services for neurology and neurosurgery, including physician clinics, radiology, diagnostics, rehabilitation therapy and a research clinic.

The joint Neurosciences Center, shown in this rendering, is scheduled to open in April.

The innovative partnership, which is an expansion of the Academic Affiliation between the University and ProMedica, will bring together UT faculty, physicians and researchers with ProMedica physicians in a single location to improve the quality of life for people living with disorders of the brain, spine, nerves and muscles.

The direct interaction between scientific researchers and clinical staff will provide patients the latest and most promising treatments for their conditions and provide students, residents and fellows a wide variety of experiences to enhance their education in an interdisciplinary setting. The joint Neurosciences Center will advance treatment for common disorders, including stroke; epilepsy; headache; movement disorders such as Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and other dementias; multiple sclerosis; and vestibular disorders that cause dizziness.

The center will be led by UT’s Dr. Gretchen Tietjen, Clair Martig Chair and Distinguished Professor of Neurology, and ProMedica’s Darrin Arquette, senior vice president for Neurosciences, Heart and Orthopaedics Institutes at ProMedica.

The joint Neurosciences Center builds on successful previous collaboration between UT and ProMedica to create a comprehensive stroke program in the region that provides lifesaving interventional therapies for patients with acute stroke and non-surgical treatment of brain aneurysms.

Pediatrician to reflect on career, life during Feb. 16 lecture

Dr. Fadia Abaza, UT alumna and retired pediatrician, will give the Medical Student Council’s 10th Annual Litzinger Legacy Lecture Friday, Feb. 16.

She will speak on “Three Worlds, Three Countries, Endless Lessons” from 5 to 7 p.m. in Health Education Building Room 110 on Health Science Campus.

Abaza received her medical degree from Damascus University Faculty of Medicine and completed a residency in pediatrics at the former Medical College of Ohio. She practiced in Maumee.

The event is an opportunity for a distinguished faculty member or graduate to share her or his reflections on career, service and life with students and other members of the College of Medicine and Life Sciences’ community.

Food will be served during Abaza’s talk.

The Legacy Lecture series is inspired by the book titled “The Last Lecture” by Randy Pausch and is named in honor of Amie Litzinger, a 2013 alumna of the UT College of Medicine, who was integral in its formation.

‘Renaissance Art as Medicine’ topic of lecture at exhibit opening

The 13th Annual Health Science Campus Artist Showcase is on display through Monday, April 2, on the fourth floor of Mulford Library.

This year’s exhibit features works by 30 artists — students, faculty and staff in the health sciences from both Health Science and Main campuses, as well as The University of Toledo Medical Center.

“Eastern Michigan University, Livonia,” photography, by Dr. Andrew Beavis, professor of physiology and pharmacology, is among the works featured in the Health Science Campus Artist Showcase.

On display will be a variety of 2-D and 3-D artwork, including paintings, drawings, photography, sculpture and mixed media.

An opening reception will be held Friday, Feb. 16, from 4 to 6 p.m. on the fourth floor of Mulford Library. Dr. Allie Terry-Fritsch, associate professor of Italian Renaissance art history at Bowling Green State University, will give a lecture titled “Renaissance Art as Medicine” at 4:30 p.m.

Terry-Fritsch’s research, which has been published widely in journals and books, focuses on the experiences of viewing art and architecture during the early modern period with an emphasis on 15th-century Florence.

Light refreshments from Caffeini’s will be served during the free, public reception and lecture.

For details, click here or contact Jodi Jameson, assistant professor and nursing librarian at Mulford Library, who is a member of the artist showcase committee, at 419.383.5152 or jodi.jameson@utoledo.edu.

“Allée du Chien, Castlefranc, France,” charcoal drawing, by Dr. Paul Brand
associate professor emeritus of physiology and pharmacology, also is featured in the exhibit.