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Distinguished educator to deliver commencement address Dec. 17

Toledo native Dr. Timothy Law Snyder, president of Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles, will present the keynote address at the UT fall commencement Saturday, Dec. 17, at 10 a.m. in Savage Arena.

Snyder, who will receive an honorary degree during the ceremony, will address 2,066 candidates for degrees: 93 doctoral, 584 master’s, 1,346 bachelor’s and 43 associate’s degrees.

Snyder

Snyder

The ceremony will be streamed live at http://video.utoledo.edu.

Snyder is a distinguished American educator and academic administrator whose career includes success as a computational mathematician, musician, published scholar, lecturer and podcaster. He attended Toledo Public Schools and graduated from UT in 1981 with bachelor’s degrees in both psychology and mathematics. Additionally, he earned a master’s degree in mathematics from UT in 1983.

Snyder also holds a second master’s degree, as well as a doctoral degree, in computational mathematics from Princeton University.

“We’re honored to have Dr. Timothy Snyder return to his alma mater as our fall commencement speaker,” said UT President Sharon L. Gaber. “His career is proof that goals can be multidirectional, and success follows people who work hard to make lasting contributions, no matter what career paths they choose over a lifetime.”

In 2014, The University of Toledo Alumni Association recognized Snyder with its College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics’ Outstanding Alumnus Award.

“I return to my hometown with pride and excitement to deliver the keynote commencement address. My educational path and career were profoundly shaped by my years at UT,” Snyder said. “I continue to resonate with UT’s mission to improve the human condition and advance knowledge, among its other values. I hope to inspire graduates to pursue their life goals with creativity and integrity.”

Snyder has held academic positions at Berklee College of Music in Boston, the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania and at Georgetown University, where he was chair of the Department of Computer Science and its first dean of science. Additionally, he served as dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Fairfield University in Connecticut and vice president for academic affairs at Loyola University Maryland. In 2015, Snyder was appointed the 16th president of Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles.

He has published and presented widely on his research, which includes computational mathematics, data structures, design and analysis of algorithms, geometric probability, digital signal processing, computer music, and the education of the millennial generation. More recently, he has been researching risk assessment in commercial airline safety, as well as HIV and its prevention.

A musician most of his life, Snyder was lead singer in the touring rock-and-punk band Whirlwind from 1976 to 1983. His music can be found on iTunes and SoundCloud. He is also active in social media through his Twitter handle @LMUSnyder.

The University’s fall commencement ceremony will recognize graduates from the colleges of Arts and Letters, Business and Innovation, Judith Herb College of Education, Health and Human Services, Medicine and Life Sciences, Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Nursing, and Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences.

Additionally, UT’s College of Engineering will hold graduation ceremonies for its undergraduate and graduate candidates Friday, Dec. 16, at 5:30 p.m. in Savage Arena.

For more information, visit utoledo.edu/commencement.

Student Nurses’ Association named tops in state

The Ohio Nursing Students’ Association has honored The University of Toledo for outstanding achievement and leadership as the top chapter in the state.

The Student Nurses’ Association is comprised of students from both The University of Toledo and Bowling Green State University. The organization was recognized by the Ohio Nursing Students’ Association, which is the state chapter of the National Student Nurses Association.

Posing for a photo with the Brain Bowl trophy in October at the Ohio Student Nurses’ Association Convention in Columbus were, from left, Karen Tormoehlen, Mariah Dooley, Kaitlin May, Alexis Ortiz, Allison Turnwald, Kayla Tibbits and Patty Sopko.

Posing for a photo with the Brain Bowl trophy in October at the Ohio Student Nurses’ Association Convention in Columbus were, from left, Karen Tormoehlen, Mariah Dooley, Kaitlin May, Alexis Ortiz, Allison Turnwald, Kayla Tibbits and Patty Sopko.

Outstanding chapter criteria include strong leadership, community outreach and research involvement.

The Students Nurses’ Association is a nonprofit organization for nursing students enrolled in the baccalaureate and clinical nurse leader programs in the UT College of Nursing.

“This organization is dedicated to the mission of fostering the professional development of nursing students while indoctrinating the standards, ethics and skills that will be required of them as future leaders of the profession,” Patty Sopko, instructor in the College of Nursing and advisor of the Student Nurses’ Association, said.

The Student Nurses’ Association is involved with community service and has worked with the Ronald McDonald House, the Sunshine Children’s Home, the Daughter Project, and the Alzheimer’s Association, as well as conducted health fairs and food drives.

“Because of our extensive involvement in the surrounding community as well as our support of state and national chapter missions, the UT chapter of the Student Nurses’ Association was named chapter of the year,” Sopko said.

In addition, Karen Tormoehlen, UT assistant professor of nursing and an advisor for the UT chapter of the Student Nurses’ Association, was named Faculty Advisor of the Year at the Ohio Student Nurses’ Association Convention.

“Karen has dedicated herself to the advancement of nursing students for the past 10 years. Her efforts have resulted in local students being elected to state and national offices,” Sopko said.

And the Student Nurses’ Association placed first in the Brain Bowl at the Ohio Student Nurses’ Association Convention in Columbus.

The Brain Bowl is an academic competition in which students from various nursing schools throughout Ohio compete against each other to win the trophy to be displayed at their institution for one year.

In October, the UT chapter won the trophy and put a halt to Capital University’s three-year winning streak. In addition, this year the winning team was awarded a free review course from Kaplan Test Prep valued at $500 per student.

The Student Nurses’ Association provides a great opportunity for students, according to Sopko.

“This organization allows nursing students the chance to enhance their knowledge of the profession, practice leadership skills, mentor younger students, build a network of future colleagues, and give back to the community that they will serve for years to come,” she said.

UT nursing program receives accreditation

The University of Toledo’s Doctor of Nursing Practice Program and post-graduate Advanced Practice Registered Nurse Certificate Program were granted accreditation by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education following an onsite review in November. The accreditation is for five years to June 2021.

college of nursing logoUT’s Post-Baccalaureate Doctor of Nursing Practice Program is designed to take nurses with a bachelor of science in nursing to the highest level of clinical practice in order to meet the increasing complexities and challenges of the nation’s health-care environment.

“UT has the only advanced practice nursing program in our region, and this accreditation places our program at the leading edge of nurse training,” Dr. Kelly Phillips, interim dean of the College of Nursing, said. “Nurses who receive the doctor of nursing practice degree are poised to be leaders in the health-care field.”

The Post-Baccalaureate Doctor of Nursing Practice Program offers specialization options in adult gerontology primary care nurse practitioner, family nurse practitioner, pediatric primary care nurse practitioner and psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner.

“In providing a variety of training options, we are meeting the needs of patients who need specialized care,” Phillips said.

The Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education is an autonomous accrediting agency that ensures the quality and integrity of nursing programs and supports continuing growth and improvement of collegiate professional education and nurse residency programs.

Assistant professor of nursing works on project for Sigma Theta Tau International’s Leadership Academy

This year, Dr. Temeaka Gray was selected as one of 13 Scholars of Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing, granting her a spot in the 2016-17 Nurse Faculty Leadership Academy.

Gray, an assistant professor in The University of Toledo’s College of Nursing, has been a member of the society since 2012.

Gray

Gray

The academy’s goals include fostering academic success, promoting nurse faculty retention, and facilitating personal leadership development, all of which are explored by projects completed by each scholar.

“The purpose of the Nurse Faculty Leadership Academy is actually to expand the scope of influence and grow nurse faculty leaders — the project is a vehicle for that,” said Gray, president of the Zeta Theta Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing at UT.

As part of the academy, Gray has designed a project around the topic of communication in the workplace, with the objective of recognizing best practices in communication and shared governance for faculty and administration. This is a topic in which Gray said she had much experience, co-authoring two chapters in academic works, one regarding communication and the other on shared governance in the workplace.

“A lot of the time, people are talking and not listening, but the most effective communication takes place when they listen as well as talk,” Gray said. “One of the pieces that I’ve seen through my literature review said that, in a shared governance environment, sometimes people just don’t know what their duties are. Do they have input in everything? Do they act through committees? I want to know what people think about communication, what they think shared governance means, and what perceptions of the best way to have conversations are.”

Participation as a scholar in the Nurse Faculty Leadership Academy includes intensive four-day workshops, one this year and one next, and a presentation on the final project at the Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing Biennial Convention in Indianapolis.

Gray said even being selected was a tremendous opportunity and, once she found out she had been one of 13 global applicants chosen, the idea of being able to confer with other nurses and like-minded professionals at a greater level was an exciting prospect. The first of the four-day workshops took place in March, and Gray said the highly immersive experience was driven by self-reflection and a close look at the operating style within the academy.

“They equipped us with a journal, so we were critically looking at ourselves as people. We used tools like the leadership practice inventory and strengths finder to assess strengths and weaknesses and, based on that, where we can to improve,” Gray said. “These workshops were from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. over four days. The leadership meetings included administrative people for the Nurse Faculty Leadership Academy, the leadership mentors, the faculty advisors and the scholar.”

The opportunity of being invited to participate in a program like the Nurse Faculty Leadership Academy of Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing is one she hopes others in her field take.

“I always stress this to nursing students because, at that time, you don’t understand what it truly means to be recognized like this,” Gray said. “By the time I was working, to be recognized at that level was so important because it was meaningful. We go around doing what we do because it’s what we do; seeing that other people recognize it is really amazing.”

She added, “Organizations that focus on professions and disciplines like nursing are actually driven by what you do. It’s a networking opportunity; you have the opportunity to learn from other people and their experiences.”

To learn more about the Scholars of Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing at UT, visit zetatheta.nursingsociety.org/home.

UT nursing student wins national association’s Core Values Award

Advocacy, professionalism, quality education, leadership and autonomy are the core values of the National Student Nurses’ Association, which recently presented Amanda Nuckols its Core Values Award.

The Core Values Award is given nationally to one student per year. The award is designed to inspire students to embody the values most important to members of the National Student Nurses’ Association.

Amanda Nuckols received the Core Values Award from the  National Student Nurses’ Association.

Amanda Nuckols received the Core Values Award from the National Student Nurses’ Association.

To be eligible for the Core Values Award, students must be pursuing a nursing degree and be a member of the National Student Nurses’ Association, and they must be nominated by faculty.

“It’s an honor working with a student that demonstrates these core values. She’s amazing. She’s humble. I’ve never met another student like her in all my years as an advisor,” said Karen Tormoehlen, Student Nurses Association advisor and assistant professor, who nominated Nuckols for the award.

Nuckols graduated in May from the Clinical Nurse Leader Program, which allows students with a bachelor’s degree in another discipline to receive a master’s degree in nursing in two years.

In her time as a nursing student, Nuckols served as president, cohort representative and convention planner of the UT Student Nurses’ Association. She also served on the Nominations and Elections Committee of the national organization.

In addition to these roles, Nuckols helped build a playground for the local Ronald McDonald House, assisted in a community event that gave families impacted by human trafficking a day at the zoo, led the local Student Nurses Association chapter in providing a bountiful Christmas for orphans, participated in medical mission trips to developing countries, volunteered at a free clinic serving the homeless, and more.

Nuckols will return to the University this fall to continue her studies with the Family Nurse Practitioner Program. She also intends to work as a registered nurse while pursuing her third degree.

“This is a huge honor,” Nuckols said. “I have worked hard to do well as I was completing my studies, while also being involved in a variety of organizations and roles. I am so glad that my effort and dedication have paid off.”

Smithsonian museum director and physicist to address UT graduates May 7

Leaders with a passion for diversity and science who have uplifted Americans through the arts, public service and higher education will address graduates at The University of Toledo’s spring commencement ceremonies Saturday, May 7, in Savage Arena.

During the 9:30 a.m. ceremony, former U.S. Congressman and physicist Dr. Rush D. Holt, who leads the world’s largest multidisciplinary scientific and engineering society, will speak to graduates from the colleges of Adult and Lifelong Learning, Health Sciences, Social Justice and Human Service, and the Judith Herb College of Education.

Dr. Johnnetta Cole, director of the Smithsonian National Museum of African Art and the first African-American female president of Spelman College, will speak at the 2 p.m. ceremony for the colleges of Business and Innovation, Communication and the Arts, Natural Sciences and Mathematics, and Languages, Literature and Social Sciences.

There are 2,843 candidates for degrees: 234 doctoral candidates, 727 master’s, education specialist and graduate certificate candidates, and 1,882 bachelor’s and associate’s candidates.

The ceremony will be streamed live on video.utoledo.edu.

Holt

Holt

Holt, who will receive an honorary doctor of public service degree during the morning ceremony, is the chief executive officer of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and executive publisher of the Science family of journals.

He served eight terms as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from New Jersey’s 12th Congressional District. During his time on Capitol Hill from 1999 to 2015, Holt advocated for increased federal research funding, science education and innovation. Holt made national headlines in 2011 when he defeated IBM’s supercomputer Watson in a non-televised round of “Jeopardy!”

Holt previously served as assistant director of Princeton University’s Plasma Physics Laboratory, one of the largest alternative energy research facilities in the country.

Cole

Cole

Cole, who will receive an honorary doctor of humane letters degree during the afternoon ceremony, made history nearly 30 years ago as the first African-American female president of Spelman College in Atlanta. She later served as president of Bennett College for Women, making Cole the only person who has been president of both historically black colleges for women in the United States.

She also was the first woman elected to the board of Coca-Cola Enterprises. She was the first African American to serve as chair of the board of the United Way of America.

Other commencement ceremonies taking place are:

• College of Engineering — graduate commencement Thursday, May 5, at 5 p.m., and undergraduate commencement Saturday, May 7, at 3 p.m. Both ceremonies will be held in Nitschke Hall Auditorium.

• College of Nursing — Friday, May 6, at 1 p.m. in Savage Arena.

• College of Law — Sunday, May 8, at 1 p.m. in the Student Union Auditorium.

• College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences — Sunday, May 8, at 10 a.m. in Savage Arena.

• College of Medicine and Life Sciences — Friday, May 27, at 2 p.m. in the Stranahan Theater, 4645 Heatherdowns Blvd., Toledo.

For more information, visit utoledo.edu/commencement.

College of Nursing research day to take place April 25

The University of Toledo College of Nursing will hold its 10th annual research day Monday, April 25, from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Student Union Auditorium.

The day’s theme is “Changing Practice Through Nursing Research,” and Dr. Claire Burke Draucker, the Angela Barron McBride Endowed Professorship in Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing at the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, will be the keynote speaker.

Draucker

Draucker

Draucker will present “Healing from Interpersonal Violence.” Her research focuses on how men and women heal from interpersonal violence throughout the lifespan and has been sponsored by the National Institute of Nursing Research, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Ohio State Department of Mental Health and private foundations.

Other topics to be covered will include: “Barriers and Facilitators to Assessing Adolescent Sexual Health Among Advanced Practice Registered Nurses,” “Problems and Successes Reported by Male Stroke Caregivers,” “Decreasing Non-Urgent Use of Emergency Department by Pediatric Patients: Interventions With Reduced Health Literacy Demands,” and “Adolescent’s Perceived Health Risks and Collective Family Efficacy.”

“The primary purpose of the research day is to enhance nursing knowledge through learning about current research and practice trends within clinical and educational nursing. This is accomplished by showcasing our talented faculty and students by sharing their research and evidence-based practice work,” said Heidi Shank, UT nursing instructor, director of BSN and RN-BSN Programs, and research day task force chair.

There is no charge to attend the event, and attendees register at the door. Sign-in will begin at 7:30 a.m., and coffee, tea and bagels will be provided. Approximately 600 people are expected to attend.

Continuing Nursing Education will be awarded for completing the day’s events.

For more information, contact Deborah Mattin at deborah.mattin@utoledo.edu or Shank at heidi.shank@utoledo.edu.

UT hosts heroin overdose simulation to help fight drug epidemic

Lying passed out on the floor with a needle stuck in his arm, “Jasper” is no dummy.

It is a human simulator posing as a man who overdosed on heroin to teach medical students at The University of Toledo how to save a drug addict’s life.

Toledo Fire and Rescue Department paramedic students administered Narcan to the simulated heroin overdose patient inside the staged apartment.

Toledo Fire and Rescue Department paramedic students administered Narcan to the simulated heroin overdose patient inside the staged apartment.

In front of an audience, students training to be doctors, nurses and emergency responders were put to the test with a heroin overdose simulation in UT’s Jacobs Interprofessional Immersive Simulation Center on Health Science Campus.

The real-time emergency situation — from the staged apartment to the simulated hospital room — was broadcast to a crowd of recovering heroin addicts, Toledo police and fire chiefs, UT faculty and staff, and community partners to increase education about Ohio’s heroin epidemic.

“We wanted everyone to experience the high-intensity process, emotions and medical treatment of heroin overdose starting inside a home,” Tia Hornish, UT clinical simulation and education research associate, said. “By watching the situation unfold, we hope they feel a connection to what is happening to people of all ages and walks of life in our community. As health-care providers, we need to be able to understand that the heroin epidemic is not discriminating against anyone and provide resources to help addicts.”

Third-year medical student Nathan Marcinkowski led the team in a state-of-the-art medical simulation suite, which served as the ER for the heroin overdose exercise.

Third-year medical student Nathan Marcinkowski led the team in a state-of-the-art medical simulation suite, which served as the ER for the heroin overdose exercise.

EMT students got experience administering the antidote drug Narcan, which is now available at pharmacies over the counter, and transporting the patient to the simulated emergency room.

“Narcan is only temporary,” Dr. Paul Rega, assistant professor in the UT Department of Emergency Medicine, said. “It does not cure.”

Since Narcan — also known as naloxone — wears off before the overdose, medical students then took over and ran through all of the life-threatening complications that come with a drug overdose.

Students training to be doctors, nurses and physician's assistants worked together to save the human simulator suffering from complications that resulted from a heroin overdose.

Students training to be doctors, nurses and physician’s assistants worked together to save the human simulator suffering from complications that resulted from a heroin overdose.

“This is an area where you have a controlled setting with a high-fidelity simulator that can mimic a lot of conditions,” Rega said. “The students practice and when the real situation arises, they are not shocked by it. They can address it in a proper fashion.”

Third-year medical student Nathan Marcinkowski was the team leader.

“Normally, students don’t get to experience these types of situations until their residencies,” Marcinkowski said. “It’s great training for us and also a great experience for the community to be here. I know there is a lot of debate about Narcan, but I think it’s really good that people are interested in learning about this.”

This time, Jasper survived.

The simulation was a shock for Matt Bell, who sat watching in the audience.

“Five dollars’ worth of heroin almost killed me,” Bell, who overdosed in fall 2014, said. “Narcan saved my life.”

Bell is co-founder of Team Recovery, a local organization of recovering heroin addicts who are working to help other addicts get sober. Team Recovery holds family support group meetings once a week. Representatives also share their stories in school classrooms from sixth grade through college to spread prevention awareness.

“I graduated from high school with a 4.0 GPA, but dropped out of UT after pain pills from a baseball injury led me ultimately to heroin addiction,” Bell said. “There is a way out. This simulation may be scary to see, but people need to understand the severity and prevalence of what is happening inside so many homes in our area.”

Creative wellness to be discussed at opening of Health Science Campus Artist Showcase

Laura Miller shared her story about how picking up a paintbrush and putting bold, eye-catching colors on canvas helped her cope with cancer in U.S. News & World Report in 2014.

The former oncology nurse will visit The University of Toledo to talk about “Art and Creative Wellness” at the opening of the 2016 Health Science Campus Artist Showcase Friday, Jan. 29.

Laura Miller and her painting, “Healing Meadow,” acrylic

Laura Miller and her painting, “Healing Meadow,” acrylic

Her talk will be at 4 p.m. in the Mulford Library iCare Room 028/029. A reception with the artists will take place from 5 to 6 p.m. on the fourth floor of the library, where more than 60 pieces are on display.

“I started painting a few months after my diagnosis,” Miller said. “I found that while painting, I lose myself to the process and moment, giving me a mental break not otherwise possible. It gave me a good distraction during a difficult time. I like to say I ‘self-medicated’ with art.”

That self-medication with art helps one’s health, too.

“Research now shows that creativity can ease pain, decrease blood pressure, help overall mental health, among other benefits,” Miller said. “The creative process helps patients heal by giving them a break from their worries, even if for a brief time, relax and express themselves.

“My creative outlet was painting, but there are many other creative outlets such as visual arts, music, writing, cooking and gardening, to name a few.”

“Marley Turner,” oil, by Jennifer Diaz Warner Giovannucci, technician in the Department of Neurosciences is included in the 2016 Health Science Campus Artist Showcase.

“Marley Turner,” oil, by Jennifer Diaz Warner Giovannucci, technician in the Department of Neurosciences, is included in the 2016 Health Science Campus Artist Showcase.

The Monclova, Ohio, resident will discuss the importance of scheduling time to use your imagination.

“We need to think about creative wellness just as we think about diet and exercise,” Miller said. “We all know that it’s important to eat right and be active. So if we know creativity is good for us, we should try to include that as part of our overall wellness plan, too.”

A total of 26 artists will share their inspiring talents in the 2016 Health Science Campus Artist Showcase. Works in several 2- and 3-dimensional media by students, faculty and staff affiliated with the health sciences on Health Science and Main campuses will be on display during the 11th annual event.

“The artist showcase is very popular with our students, faculty and staff,” Jodi Jameson, instructor in the College of Nursing, librarian in Mulford Library, and member of the artist showcase committee, said. “It’s always fun to see the creative side of those that you work or study with on a daily basis.”

The free, public exhibition will be on display through Friday, March 18.

For more information on Miller, go to lauramillerartist.com; for more information on the showcase, visit libguides.utoledo.edu/hscart or call 419.383.4218.

“Dewdrop Flower Closeup,” photography, by Dr. Rick Francis, director of research and sponsored programs

“Dewdrop Flower Closeup,” photography, by Dr. Rick Francis, director of research and sponsored programs, is among 60 pieces on display in this year’s Health Science Campus Artist Showcase on the fourth floor of Mulford Library.

University nursing organization named best in state

The University of Toledo Student Nurses’ Association took home honors for the Chapter of the Year at the Ohio Student Nurses’ Association convention in October.

To win the honor, a chapter applies for the award and is then reviewed by a board of directors. A chapter should be active on campus, promote professional development, and display student success to win the award.

“Toledo is the most active chapter in the state and that helped us win,” said Amanda Nuckols, president of the UT Student Nurses’ Association chapter.

Showing off the certificate the UT Student Nurses’ Association received in October were, from left, Stacy Barnes, Amanda Nuckols, Adviser Denise Oancea, College of Nursing Interim Dean Kelly Phillips, Adviser Karen Tormoehlen, Max Pulfer and Morgan Rethman. Nuckols is the president of the chapter, and Barnes, Pulfer and Rethman are executive board members of the organization.

Showing off the certificate the UT Student Nurses’ Association received in October were, from left, Stacy Barnes, Amanda Nuckols, Adviser Denise Oancea, College of Nursing Interim Dean Kelly Phillips, Adviser Karen Tormoehlen, Max Pulfer and Morgan Rethman. Nuckols is the president of the chapter, and Barnes, Pulfer and Rethman are executive board members of the organization.

In 2014, the chapter also was named a Stellar Chapter, a national award recognizing school chapters that demonstrate ongoing involvement in the organization, including a strong commitment to shared governance and professional development of students and faculty.

The professional student organization has a strong presence on UT’s campus, offering a variety of student social activities, community outreach and professional development for students to network with nursing employers.

In fact, November was one of the chapter’s busiest months. In a single week, the group collected more than 700 items for the Cherry Street Mission’s Thanksgiving baskets; held an apparel sale that sold more than 200 items; made eight dozen cookies for Veterans Day that were given to a branch of the American Legions, the nation’s largest wartime veterans service organization; planned a surprise party for one of the group’s advisers who was retiring; and created busy blankets — small quilts made with squares of material featuring zippers, buttons, netting, satin, ribbons, lace and other materials for Alzheimer’s patients to keep on their laps and fiddle with.

“It was crazy,” Nuckols said of the week and laughed. “But it all turned out really well.”

If interested in joining, Nuckols encourages people to come to meetings, which are held biweekly in Collier Building Room 2401. The schedule for spring semester will be announced early next year.

“This organization has done countless things for me,” she said. “It’s really helped me to grow, be more structured with my time, and break out of my shell.”

Pre-nursing students also are encouraged to join the UT Pre-Nursing Student Organization. For more information, contact Carol Bryan at carol.bryan@utoledo.edu.

To learn more about the UT Student Nurses’ Association and to find out the date of the next meeting in January, contact Nuckols at amanda.nuckols@utoledo.edu.