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Physician/author to discuss health and race

Being black can be bad for your health — Dr. Damon Tweedy wrote about hearing that as a first-year medical student at Duke University in 1997.

His book, “Black Man in a White Coat: A Doctor’s Reflections on Race and Medicine,” became a New York Times Bestseller and was one of Time magazine’s top 10 nonfiction books in 2015.

Tweedy

“From the beginning of life to the very end — and everywhere in between — African Americans continue to experience disproportionately worse health outcomes,” Tweedy said. “You can name pretty much any disease, and you’re likely to find that it’s either more common in black people; black people who get the disease have a worse course; or both of these conditions. There are a lot of factors involved with this, and I explore many of them in my book.”

Tweedy will discuss race and health disparities Thursday, Feb. 16, at 7 p.m. in Collier Building Room 1200.

For several years, the assistant professor of psychiatry at Duke University Medical Center and staff physician at the Durham Veteran Affairs Medical Center has written and lectured on race and medicine. His articles have been published by The New York Times, the Chicago Tribune and The Washington Post, as well as by several medical journals.

In his book, he wrote, “Whether it is premature birth, infant mortality, homicide, childhood obesity or HIV infection, black children and young adults disproportionately bear the brunt of these medical and social ills. By middle age, heart disease, diabetes, stroke, kidney failure and cancer have a suffocating grip on the health of black people and maintain this stranglehold on them well into their senior years.”

“I wanted to put a human touch to these issues of racial health disparities — examining how this impacts real people in everyday life,” Tweedy said. “Many people are more likely to engage in these issues when they are presented as stories rather than simply as statistics.

“I also wanted to explore some of the unique challenges faced by African-American doctors — a largely unexplored perspective in popular medical narratives,” he added.

His free, public talk is sponsored by We Are STEMM, a UT organization dedicated to empowering and inspiring students from underrepresented populations who are interested in science, technology, engineering, math and medicine. Led by faculty and staff, the group celebrates and supports diversity in several UT colleges: Natural Sciences and Mathematics; Engineering; Medicine and Life Sciences; Nursing; Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences; and Health and Human Services.

“I found Dr. Tweedy’s book to be inspirational. While it reveals a story often heard in the community of underrepresented groups pursuing higher education, I think he has been able to deliver many aspects in a manner that may be enlightening and perhaps more palatable to those freed from this ‘experience,’” said Dr. Anthony Quinn, assistant dean for diversity and inclusion in the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, and chair of We Are STEMM.

“In contemporary society, there is the perception that history can be wiped clean with a single piece of new legislation — no need to deal with lasting psychological scars inflicted by past overt and covert policies or the entrenched social norms that are retained and vigorously guarded for generations in spite of new laws,” Quinn continued. “Dr. Tweedy brings out the adverse and lasting impact that discriminatory practices can have on individuals and society long past the time of those who initially implemented them.”

Tweedy’s talk is one of the University’s events scheduled for Black History Month.

Hospital leader named UTMC CEO

Dan Barbee has been named chief executive officer of The University of Toledo Medical Center after serving in the role on an interim basis since June 1, 2016.

Barbee, who has nearly 25 years of combined clinical and health-care management experience, is responsible for the operational and strategic activities of UT’s medical center and clinics that average each year more than 12,000 admissions, 36,000 emergency department visits and 250,000 ambulatory care visits.

Barbee

“We are very happy that Dan will continue to lead UTMC in the future,” UT President Sharon L. Gaber said. “He has proven himself to be a passionate, flexible and effective leader. Together with his team, I am confident Dan will continue to guide the hospital successfully in the changing health-care environment.”

Prior to serving as CEO, Barbee was UTMC’s chief operating officer and vice president of clinical service. He joined the medical center in 2011 as chief nursing officer and associate executive director.

“I am honored for the opportunity to continue to lead our dedicated team of more than 2,300 employees and physicians who are committed to providing high-quality care in our community,” Barbee said.

Barbee received a bachelor’s degree in nursing from Illinois State University and a master of business administration degree from the University of Phoenix.

He serves as a trustee for the Hospital Council of Northwest Ohio and on the boards of The University of Toledo Medical Assurance Co. and Toledo/Lucas County CareNet. Barbee also is a member of the UT College of Nursing’s advisory board and Mercy College of Ohio’s nursing program advisory committee.

UT scholars to host forum Feb. 13 titled ‘Our Bodies, Ourselves in the Time of Trump’

The University of Toledo’s third post-election forum since President Donald Trump was elected focuses on the topic “Our Bodies, Ourselves in the Time of Trump” and implications of repealing the Affordable Care Act.

The free, public event to discuss health care, reproductive rights and LGBTQA+ issues will be held Monday, Feb. 13, at 6 p.m. at the Kent Branch Library, 3101 Collingwood Blvd.

“Based on actions thus far and the 2016 presidential campaign, we know the Trump administration will be approaching all three of these areas of policy with a different perspective from the previous administration,” said Dr. Ally Day, assistant professor in the UT Disability Studies Program. “Our forum is designed to address changes and questions community members may have in relation to larger policy and their own health-care options.”

Featured speakers will include:

• Dr. Karen Hoblet, UT associate professor of nursing;

• Robert Salem, UT clinical professor of law and chair of the Equality Toledo Board of Directors;

• Anita Rios, Ohio NOW;

• Hillary Gyuras, community education manager for Planned Parenthood of Greater Ohio;

• Sarah Inskeep, regional field manager for Planned Parenthood Advocates of Ohio; and

• Katie Hunt Thomas, disability rights attorney for the Ability Center of Greater Toledo.

The event is sponsored by the UT College of Law and the School for Interdisciplinary Studies in the College of Arts and Letters.

UTMC sets path forward to serve health-care needs of community

After a thorough review during the past year, The University of Toledo leadership has determined that the UT Medical Center will continue to operate as a teaching hospital, serving the community in South Toledo.

utmc-still-copyIn addition to reviewing UTMC operations, service lines, efficiencies and its customer base, UT leaders studied the rapidly evolving health-care market to determine the most viable path forward for the medical center. They also took into account the change going on at the University, in the industry and in local communities.

“In a rapidly changing industry such as health care, it was imperative that we take the time to thoroughly review our operations, the community we serve, and the dynamics of the health-care market. We needed to be sure we could successfully adapt to the changing environment we live in and continue to serve our 80,000 neighbors effectively,” UT President Sharon L. Gaber said. “We have confidence in our team, and we appreciate the patience everyone exhibited while we worked toward determining this path forward.”

A letter sent to the UT community Jan. 24 from Gaber and Executive Vice President for Clinical Affairs Christopher Cooper noted the hospital’s financial strength and stated UTMC was operating at full or near-full capacity, and together with its clinics served nearly 300,000 people last year.

“The financial health of UTMC played a key role in our analysis, and we want it to be clear that the hospital remains viable only if it continues to enhance its productivity and efficiencies going forward,” the letter stated.

UTMC will continue to be a teaching hospital for UT’s colleges of Medicine and Life Sciences; Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences; Nursing; and Health and Human Services.

In addition, the path forward will include gradually adding more primary care and behavioral health options at UTMC to meet the evolving health-care needs of the community and to strengthen the University’s training programs.

“We are committed to evolving in a way that keeps our hospital strong, and as we do so, to communicating with you ahead of any changes,” the letter stated.

UTMC leaders are meeting with employees throughout the week to provide more information and answer questions. The schedule for information meetings is:

Tuesday, Jan. 24
• UTMC employee meeting at noon in Health Education Building Room 100

• College of Medicine and Life Sciences faculty meeting at 5 p.m. in Health Education Room 100

• UTMC employee meeting at 6:30 p.m. in Health Education Building Room 105
• UTMC employee meeting at 7:45 p.m. in Health Education Building Room 105


Wednesday, Jan. 25

• UTMC employee meeting at 7:45 a.m. in the Pinnacle Lounge

• College of Medicine and Life Sciences students and residents meeting at noon in Health Education Building Room 100

Thursday, Jan. 26
• UT Physicians employees meeting at 11 a.m. at Glendale Medical Center

Additional information is available online on the myUT portal under the new UTMC tab.

To submit questions or comments, email UTMCquestions@utoledo.edu or call 419.383.6814.

Distinguished educator to deliver commencement address Dec. 17

Toledo native Dr. Timothy Law Snyder, president of Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles, will present the keynote address at the UT fall commencement Saturday, Dec. 17, at 10 a.m. in Savage Arena.

Snyder, who will receive an honorary degree during the ceremony, will address 2,066 candidates for degrees: 93 doctoral, 584 master’s, 1,346 bachelor’s and 43 associate’s degrees.

Snyder

Snyder

The ceremony will be streamed live at http://video.utoledo.edu.

Snyder is a distinguished American educator and academic administrator whose career includes success as a computational mathematician, musician, published scholar, lecturer and podcaster. He attended Toledo Public Schools and graduated from UT in 1981 with bachelor’s degrees in both psychology and mathematics. Additionally, he earned a master’s degree in mathematics from UT in 1983.

Snyder also holds a second master’s degree, as well as a doctoral degree, in computational mathematics from Princeton University.

“We’re honored to have Dr. Timothy Snyder return to his alma mater as our fall commencement speaker,” said UT President Sharon L. Gaber. “His career is proof that goals can be multidirectional, and success follows people who work hard to make lasting contributions, no matter what career paths they choose over a lifetime.”

In 2014, The University of Toledo Alumni Association recognized Snyder with its College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics’ Outstanding Alumnus Award.

“I return to my hometown with pride and excitement to deliver the keynote commencement address. My educational path and career were profoundly shaped by my years at UT,” Snyder said. “I continue to resonate with UT’s mission to improve the human condition and advance knowledge, among its other values. I hope to inspire graduates to pursue their life goals with creativity and integrity.”

Snyder has held academic positions at Berklee College of Music in Boston, the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania and at Georgetown University, where he was chair of the Department of Computer Science and its first dean of science. Additionally, he served as dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Fairfield University in Connecticut and vice president for academic affairs at Loyola University Maryland. In 2015, Snyder was appointed the 16th president of Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles.

He has published and presented widely on his research, which includes computational mathematics, data structures, design and analysis of algorithms, geometric probability, digital signal processing, computer music, and the education of the millennial generation. More recently, he has been researching risk assessment in commercial airline safety, as well as HIV and its prevention.

A musician most of his life, Snyder was lead singer in the touring rock-and-punk band Whirlwind from 1976 to 1983. His music can be found on iTunes and SoundCloud. He is also active in social media through his Twitter handle @LMUSnyder.

The University’s fall commencement ceremony will recognize graduates from the colleges of Arts and Letters, Business and Innovation, Judith Herb College of Education, Health and Human Services, Medicine and Life Sciences, Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Nursing, and Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences.

Additionally, UT’s College of Engineering will hold graduation ceremonies for its undergraduate and graduate candidates Friday, Dec. 16, at 5:30 p.m. in Savage Arena.

For more information, visit utoledo.edu/commencement.

Student Nurses’ Association named tops in state

The Ohio Nursing Students’ Association has honored The University of Toledo for outstanding achievement and leadership as the top chapter in the state.

The Student Nurses’ Association is comprised of students from both The University of Toledo and Bowling Green State University. The organization was recognized by the Ohio Nursing Students’ Association, which is the state chapter of the National Student Nurses Association.

Posing for a photo with the Brain Bowl trophy in October at the Ohio Student Nurses’ Association Convention in Columbus were, from left, Karen Tormoehlen, Mariah Dooley, Kaitlin May, Alexis Ortiz, Allison Turnwald, Kayla Tibbits and Patty Sopko.

Posing for a photo with the Brain Bowl trophy in October at the Ohio Student Nurses’ Association Convention in Columbus were, from left, Karen Tormoehlen, Mariah Dooley, Kaitlin May, Alexis Ortiz, Allison Turnwald, Kayla Tibbits and Patty Sopko.

Outstanding chapter criteria include strong leadership, community outreach and research involvement.

The Students Nurses’ Association is a nonprofit organization for nursing students enrolled in the baccalaureate and clinical nurse leader programs in the UT College of Nursing.

“This organization is dedicated to the mission of fostering the professional development of nursing students while indoctrinating the standards, ethics and skills that will be required of them as future leaders of the profession,” Patty Sopko, instructor in the College of Nursing and advisor of the Student Nurses’ Association, said.

The Student Nurses’ Association is involved with community service and has worked with the Ronald McDonald House, the Sunshine Children’s Home, the Daughter Project, and the Alzheimer’s Association, as well as conducted health fairs and food drives.

“Because of our extensive involvement in the surrounding community as well as our support of state and national chapter missions, the UT chapter of the Student Nurses’ Association was named chapter of the year,” Sopko said.

In addition, Karen Tormoehlen, UT assistant professor of nursing and an advisor for the UT chapter of the Student Nurses’ Association, was named Faculty Advisor of the Year at the Ohio Student Nurses’ Association Convention.

“Karen has dedicated herself to the advancement of nursing students for the past 10 years. Her efforts have resulted in local students being elected to state and national offices,” Sopko said.

And the Student Nurses’ Association placed first in the Brain Bowl at the Ohio Student Nurses’ Association Convention in Columbus.

The Brain Bowl is an academic competition in which students from various nursing schools throughout Ohio compete against each other to win the trophy to be displayed at their institution for one year.

In October, the UT chapter won the trophy and put a halt to Capital University’s three-year winning streak. In addition, this year the winning team was awarded a free review course from Kaplan Test Prep valued at $500 per student.

The Student Nurses’ Association provides a great opportunity for students, according to Sopko.

“This organization allows nursing students the chance to enhance their knowledge of the profession, practice leadership skills, mentor younger students, build a network of future colleagues, and give back to the community that they will serve for years to come,” she said.

UT nursing program receives accreditation

The University of Toledo’s Doctor of Nursing Practice Program and post-graduate Advanced Practice Registered Nurse Certificate Program were granted accreditation by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education following an onsite review in November. The accreditation is for five years to June 2021.

college of nursing logoUT’s Post-Baccalaureate Doctor of Nursing Practice Program is designed to take nurses with a bachelor of science in nursing to the highest level of clinical practice in order to meet the increasing complexities and challenges of the nation’s health-care environment.

“UT has the only advanced practice nursing program in our region, and this accreditation places our program at the leading edge of nurse training,” Dr. Kelly Phillips, interim dean of the College of Nursing, said. “Nurses who receive the doctor of nursing practice degree are poised to be leaders in the health-care field.”

The Post-Baccalaureate Doctor of Nursing Practice Program offers specialization options in adult gerontology primary care nurse practitioner, family nurse practitioner, pediatric primary care nurse practitioner and psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner.

“In providing a variety of training options, we are meeting the needs of patients who need specialized care,” Phillips said.

The Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education is an autonomous accrediting agency that ensures the quality and integrity of nursing programs and supports continuing growth and improvement of collegiate professional education and nurse residency programs.

Assistant professor of nursing works on project for Sigma Theta Tau International’s Leadership Academy

This year, Dr. Temeaka Gray was selected as one of 13 Scholars of Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing, granting her a spot in the 2016-17 Nurse Faculty Leadership Academy.

Gray, an assistant professor in The University of Toledo’s College of Nursing, has been a member of the society since 2012.

Gray

Gray

The academy’s goals include fostering academic success, promoting nurse faculty retention, and facilitating personal leadership development, all of which are explored by projects completed by each scholar.

“The purpose of the Nurse Faculty Leadership Academy is actually to expand the scope of influence and grow nurse faculty leaders — the project is a vehicle for that,” said Gray, president of the Zeta Theta Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing at UT.

As part of the academy, Gray has designed a project around the topic of communication in the workplace, with the objective of recognizing best practices in communication and shared governance for faculty and administration. This is a topic in which Gray said she had much experience, co-authoring two chapters in academic works, one regarding communication and the other on shared governance in the workplace.

“A lot of the time, people are talking and not listening, but the most effective communication takes place when they listen as well as talk,” Gray said. “One of the pieces that I’ve seen through my literature review said that, in a shared governance environment, sometimes people just don’t know what their duties are. Do they have input in everything? Do they act through committees? I want to know what people think about communication, what they think shared governance means, and what perceptions of the best way to have conversations are.”

Participation as a scholar in the Nurse Faculty Leadership Academy includes intensive four-day workshops, one this year and one next, and a presentation on the final project at the Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing Biennial Convention in Indianapolis.

Gray said even being selected was a tremendous opportunity and, once she found out she had been one of 13 global applicants chosen, the idea of being able to confer with other nurses and like-minded professionals at a greater level was an exciting prospect. The first of the four-day workshops took place in March, and Gray said the highly immersive experience was driven by self-reflection and a close look at the operating style within the academy.

“They equipped us with a journal, so we were critically looking at ourselves as people. We used tools like the leadership practice inventory and strengths finder to assess strengths and weaknesses and, based on that, where we can to improve,” Gray said. “These workshops were from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. over four days. The leadership meetings included administrative people for the Nurse Faculty Leadership Academy, the leadership mentors, the faculty advisors and the scholar.”

The opportunity of being invited to participate in a program like the Nurse Faculty Leadership Academy of Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing is one she hopes others in her field take.

“I always stress this to nursing students because, at that time, you don’t understand what it truly means to be recognized like this,” Gray said. “By the time I was working, to be recognized at that level was so important because it was meaningful. We go around doing what we do because it’s what we do; seeing that other people recognize it is really amazing.”

She added, “Organizations that focus on professions and disciplines like nursing are actually driven by what you do. It’s a networking opportunity; you have the opportunity to learn from other people and their experiences.”

To learn more about the Scholars of Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing at UT, visit zetatheta.nursingsociety.org/home.

UT nursing student wins national association’s Core Values Award

Advocacy, professionalism, quality education, leadership and autonomy are the core values of the National Student Nurses’ Association, which recently presented Amanda Nuckols its Core Values Award.

The Core Values Award is given nationally to one student per year. The award is designed to inspire students to embody the values most important to members of the National Student Nurses’ Association.

Amanda Nuckols received the Core Values Award from the  National Student Nurses’ Association.

Amanda Nuckols received the Core Values Award from the National Student Nurses’ Association.

To be eligible for the Core Values Award, students must be pursuing a nursing degree and be a member of the National Student Nurses’ Association, and they must be nominated by faculty.

“It’s an honor working with a student that demonstrates these core values. She’s amazing. She’s humble. I’ve never met another student like her in all my years as an advisor,” said Karen Tormoehlen, Student Nurses Association advisor and assistant professor, who nominated Nuckols for the award.

Nuckols graduated in May from the Clinical Nurse Leader Program, which allows students with a bachelor’s degree in another discipline to receive a master’s degree in nursing in two years.

In her time as a nursing student, Nuckols served as president, cohort representative and convention planner of the UT Student Nurses’ Association. She also served on the Nominations and Elections Committee of the national organization.

In addition to these roles, Nuckols helped build a playground for the local Ronald McDonald House, assisted in a community event that gave families impacted by human trafficking a day at the zoo, led the local Student Nurses Association chapter in providing a bountiful Christmas for orphans, participated in medical mission trips to developing countries, volunteered at a free clinic serving the homeless, and more.

Nuckols will return to the University this fall to continue her studies with the Family Nurse Practitioner Program. She also intends to work as a registered nurse while pursuing her third degree.

“This is a huge honor,” Nuckols said. “I have worked hard to do well as I was completing my studies, while also being involved in a variety of organizations and roles. I am so glad that my effort and dedication have paid off.”

Smithsonian museum director and physicist to address UT graduates May 7

Leaders with a passion for diversity and science who have uplifted Americans through the arts, public service and higher education will address graduates at The University of Toledo’s spring commencement ceremonies Saturday, May 7, in Savage Arena.

During the 9:30 a.m. ceremony, former U.S. Congressman and physicist Dr. Rush D. Holt, who leads the world’s largest multidisciplinary scientific and engineering society, will speak to graduates from the colleges of Adult and Lifelong Learning, Health Sciences, Social Justice and Human Service, and the Judith Herb College of Education.

Dr. Johnnetta Cole, director of the Smithsonian National Museum of African Art and the first African-American female president of Spelman College, will speak at the 2 p.m. ceremony for the colleges of Business and Innovation, Communication and the Arts, Natural Sciences and Mathematics, and Languages, Literature and Social Sciences.

There are 2,843 candidates for degrees: 234 doctoral candidates, 727 master’s, education specialist and graduate certificate candidates, and 1,882 bachelor’s and associate’s candidates.

The ceremony will be streamed live on video.utoledo.edu.

Holt

Holt

Holt, who will receive an honorary doctor of public service degree during the morning ceremony, is the chief executive officer of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and executive publisher of the Science family of journals.

He served eight terms as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from New Jersey’s 12th Congressional District. During his time on Capitol Hill from 1999 to 2015, Holt advocated for increased federal research funding, science education and innovation. Holt made national headlines in 2011 when he defeated IBM’s supercomputer Watson in a non-televised round of “Jeopardy!”

Holt previously served as assistant director of Princeton University’s Plasma Physics Laboratory, one of the largest alternative energy research facilities in the country.

Cole

Cole

Cole, who will receive an honorary doctor of humane letters degree during the afternoon ceremony, made history nearly 30 years ago as the first African-American female president of Spelman College in Atlanta. She later served as president of Bennett College for Women, making Cole the only person who has been president of both historically black colleges for women in the United States.

She also was the first woman elected to the board of Coca-Cola Enterprises. She was the first African American to serve as chair of the board of the United Way of America.

Other commencement ceremonies taking place are:

• College of Engineering — graduate commencement Thursday, May 5, at 5 p.m., and undergraduate commencement Saturday, May 7, at 3 p.m. Both ceremonies will be held in Nitschke Hall Auditorium.

• College of Nursing — Friday, May 6, at 1 p.m. in Savage Arena.

• College of Law — Sunday, May 8, at 1 p.m. in the Student Union Auditorium.

• College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences — Sunday, May 8, at 10 a.m. in Savage Arena.

• College of Medicine and Life Sciences — Friday, May 27, at 2 p.m. in the Stranahan Theater, 4645 Heatherdowns Blvd., Toledo.

For more information, visit utoledo.edu/commencement.