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UT researchers to lead 38% of Ohio’s new water quality research projects, including ‘impairment’ criteria

The University of Toledo is slated to lead eight out of the 21 new research projects to be funded with $3.5 million from the state of Ohio to address water quality and algal bloom toxicity.

UT, situated on the western basin of Lake Erie, is to receive nearly $1 million of the $3.5 million dedicated by the Ohio Department of Higher Education for these additional projects in the ongoing, statewide Harmful Algal Bloom Research Initiative, which began three years ago after the city of Toledo issued a Do Not Drink advisory for half a million water customers due to the level of microcystin detected in the water.

Dr. Tom Bridgeman, UT algae researcher and professor of ecology, examines a water sample aboard the UT Lake Erie Center research vessel.

UT is one of the lead universities in the Harmful Algal Bloom Research Initiative, which consists of 10 Ohio universities and five state agencies.

The selected projects focus on reducing nutrient loading to Lake Erie; investigating algal toxin formation and human health impacts; studying bloom dynamics; better informing water treatment plants how to remove toxin; and aiding the efforts of state agencies.

Dr. Tom Bridgeman, professor in the Department of Environmental Sciences, will lead a project to develop sampling protocols and collect samples to assess listing criteria that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency may use to monitor the water quality of the open waters of the western basin of Lake Erie and to potentially assign official designations such as “impaired” or “unimpaired.”

“Although it is obvious to nearly everyone that harmful algal blooms are impairing Lake Erie each summer, we need to develop objective scientific criteria that can be used to list the open waters of the lake as officially ‘impaired,’ and to remove an ‘impairment’ designation in the future if conditions improve sufficiently,” Bridgeman said.

UT researchers also to receive some of the $988,829 in state funding for their projects are:

• Dr. Jason Huntley, associate professor in the Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, will be developing and testing biofilters — water filters containing specialized bacteria that degrade microcystin toxins from lake water as it flows through the filter. These biofilter studies are aimed to develop cost-effective, efficient and safe drinking water treatment alternatives for the city of Toledo and other Lake Erie water municipalities.

• Dr. Steven Haller and Dr. David Kennedy, assistant professors in the Department of Medicine, will investigate how cyanotoxins such as microcystin damage organs not only in healthy settings, but in settings that may increase susceptibility such as diabetes, obesity and inflammatory bowel disease. Their research teams are working in concert with experts in medicine, pathology, physiology, pharmacology and chemistry to not only learn how microcystin affects organ function in these settings, but also to create new therapies to prevent and treat organ damage, especially in vulnerable patient populations.

• Dr. Patrick Lawrence, UT professor in the Department of Geography and Planning, will use a transportation model to simulate potential distribution of volume of agricultural manure from permitted livestock facilities to surrounding farmland for application as a nutrient. The results will assist in determining the estimated acreage of land within the Lake Erie western basin where manure application could be undertaken and examine associated crop types, farming practices, soil types, drainage and other environmental conditions in those areas.

• Dr. Saatvika Rai, assistant professor of environmental policy in the Department of Political Science and Public Administration, and Dr. Kevin Czajkowski, professor in the Department of Geography and Planning, will use GIS and remote sensing to assess the implementation of agricultural and farming practices in three sub-watersheds of the Maumee River Basin — Auglaize, Blanchard and St. Joseph — to identify where best management practices are being implemented. These maps will then be correlated with perceptions of farmers through surveys and interviews to identify hotspots and priority areas for policy intervention in the region.

• Dr. April Ames, assistant professor in the College of Health and Human Services, will apply an industrial hygiene technique to the exploration of the presence of microcystin in the air using research boats on Lake Erie. Simultaneously, residents who live on or near Lake Erie will be surveyed about their recreational use and self-reported health.

“I am proud of the work that is being done, and that researchers from our public and private higher education institutions continue to work together to address this issue,” said Ohio Department of Higher Education Chancellor John Carey. “Using the talent of Ohio’s researchers and students to solve pressing problems makes perfect sense.”

The Harmful Algal Bloom Research Initiative is funded by the Ohio Department of Higher Education with $7.1 million made available for four rounds of research funding since 2015. Matching funding from participating Ohio universities increases the total investment to almost $15.5 million for more than 50 projects, demonstrating the state’s overall commitment to solving the harmful algal bloom problem.

Water quality is a major research focus at UT. With more than $14 million in active grants underway, UT experts are studying algal blooms, invasive species such as Asian carp, and pollutants. Researchers are looking for pathways to restore our greatest natural resource for future generations to ensure our communities continue to have access to safe drinking water.

The UT Water Task Force, which is composed of faculty and researchers in diverse fields spanning the University, serves as a resource for government officials and the public looking for expertise on investigating the causes and effects of algal blooms, the health of Lake Erie, and the health of the communities depending on its water. The task force includes experts in economics, engineering, environmental sciences, business, pharmacy, law, chemistry and biochemistry, geography and planning, and medical microbiology and immunology.

‘Renaissance Art as Medicine’ topic of lecture at exhibit opening

The 13th Annual Health Science Campus Artist Showcase is on display through Monday, April 2, on the fourth floor of Mulford Library.

This year’s exhibit features works by 30 artists — students, faculty and staff in the health sciences from both Health Science and Main campuses, as well as The University of Toledo Medical Center.

“Eastern Michigan University, Livonia,” photography, by Dr. Andrew Beavis, professor of physiology and pharmacology, is among the works featured in the Health Science Campus Artist Showcase.

On display will be a variety of 2-D and 3-D artwork, including paintings, drawings, photography, sculpture and mixed media.

An opening reception will be held Friday, Feb. 16, from 4 to 6 p.m. on the fourth floor of Mulford Library. Dr. Allie Terry-Fritsch, associate professor of Italian Renaissance art history at Bowling Green State University, will give a lecture titled “Renaissance Art as Medicine” at 4:30 p.m.

Terry-Fritsch’s research, which has been published widely in journals and books, focuses on the experiences of viewing art and architecture during the early modern period with an emphasis on 15th-century Florence.

Light refreshments from Caffeini’s will be served during the free, public reception and lecture.

For details, click here or contact Jodi Jameson, assistant professor and nursing librarian at Mulford Library, who is a member of the artist showcase committee, at 419.383.5152 or jodi.jameson@utoledo.edu.

“Allée du Chien, Castlefranc, France,” charcoal drawing, by Dr. Paul Brand
associate professor emeritus of physiology and pharmacology, also is featured in the exhibit.

Call for submissions: Works for 2018 Health Science Campus Artist Showcase

Mulford Library is seeking submissions for its 13th Annual Health Science Campus Artist Showcase.

The deadline to apply for consideration to be included in the showcase is Friday, Jan. 12.

The library is accepting submissions from UT faculty, staff and students in the health sciences — nursing, medicine, pharmacy and the health professions — as well as UT Medical Center employees.

To be considered for the show, digital images of artwork can be sent to hscartshow@utoledo.edu, along with a submission form that can be found with guidelines here.

In the past, the showcase has featured artwork in a variety of media, including photography, painting, drawing, sculpture, jewelry making, quilting, multimedia, graphics, wood carving and more.

The showcase will be on display from Feb. 12 through April 2 on the fourth floor of Mulford Library.

An artist reception is planned for Friday, Feb. 16, from 4 to 6 p.m. with a lecture on “Renaissance Art as Medicine” by Allie Terry-Fritsch, associate professor of art history at Bowling Green State University.

Questions about the showcase can be directed to Jodi Jameson, assistant professor and nursing librarian at Mulford Library, who is a member of the artist showcase committee, at 419.383.5152 or jodi.jameson@utoledo.edu.

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist to deliver UT commencement address Dec. 17

Toledo native and Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Michael D. Sallah will return to his alma mater Sunday, Dec. 17, to deliver the keynote address during The University of Toledo’s fall commencement ceremony.

The event will begin at 10 a.m. in Savage Arena.

Sallah

Sallah will address 2,067 candidates for degrees, including 118 doctoral, 523 master’s, 1,370 bachelor’s and 56 associate’s.

The ceremony is open to the public and can be viewed live at video.utoledo.edu.

Sallah’s investigative work as a reporter and editor with award-winning newspapers across the country has revealed public corruption, police abuses and government blunders, resulting in grand jury investigations, legislative reform, and the recovery of millions of taxpayer dollars.

He is a reporter on the national investigations team at USA Today/Gannett Network in Washington, D.C.

“This is where it all began for me,” Sallah said. “From the time I took my first journalism class in the fall of my freshman year, I fell in love with journalism, and UT is a big part of that. It’s part of my foundation — the professors, the values they conveyed to me about journalism, and why it’s so critical to our society, especially investigative work. I’m honored to be coming home to be the commencement speaker.”

“Journalists have an important role to inform the public about the issues that affect our lives, and Michael Sallah has embraced that responsibility uncovering many misdeeds through investigative reporting that resulted in positive change,” UT President Sharon L. Gaber said. “I look forward to him sharing with our graduates how he got his start here in Toledo and inspiring them to stay curious and serve their communities.”

Born in Toledo, Sallah is a 1977 alumnus of The University of Toledo, graduating cum laude with a bachelor of arts degree in journalism. He was named UT’s Outstanding Alumnus in the Social Sciences in 2004. Sallah also is a 1973 graduate of St. John’s Jesuit High School.

He was a reporter and national affairs writer at The Blade for more than a decade, and was the lead reporter on the 2003 project “Buried Secrets, Brutal Truths” that exposed the U.S. Army’s longest war crimes case of the Vietnam War. The series won numerous national awards, including the 2004 Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting.

While investigations editor and reporter at the Miami Herald, Sallah led an inquiry into local corruption. His team’s 2006 “House of Lies” series exposed widespread fraud in Miami-Dade County public housing and earned the 2007 Pulitzer Prize for Local Reporting. He was named a 2012 Pulitzer Prize finalist for his series “Neglected to Death,” which uncovered deadly conditions in Florida assisted-living facilities, led to the closing of 13 facilities, and was the impetus for a gubernatorial task force to overhaul state law.

During his two years at The Washington Post, Sallah received a Robert F. Kennedy Award for Excellence in Journalism for an investigation that exposed a predatory system of tax collection in the District of Columbia. 

He returned to the Miami Herald in 2014 and was named a Pulitzer Prize finalist in 2016 for uncovering one of the nation’s most corrupt sting operations in a police unit that laundered $71.5 million for drug cartels, kept millions for brokering the deals, and failed to make a single significant arrest. 

Sallah is the author of the books “Tiger Force: A True Story of Men and War” and “Yankee Comandante: The Untold Story of Courage, Passion and One American’s Fight to Liberate Cuba.” He also was a consultant for the Public Broadcasting Service documentary “American Experience.”

UT’s fall commencement ceremony will recognize graduates from the colleges of Arts and Letters; Business and Innovation; Judith Herb College of Education; Engineering; Graduate Studies; Health and Human Services; Honors College; Natural Sciences and Mathematics; Nursing; and Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences; and University College.

For more information, visit utoledo.edu/commencement.

Stuffed animal toy drive this week at UT Medical Center

Student organizations on Health Science Campus are accepting stuffed animal donations this week.

New stuffed animals can be dropped off between noon and 2 p.m. through Friday, Dec. 8, in the Four Seasons Bistro at UT Medical Center.

Monetary donations also will be accepted.

All proceeds will be used to purchase stuffed animals for pediatric patients at the UTMC Emergency Department.

A member of the Satellites Auxiliary tied UT ribbons on stuffed animals that will be given to children in the UT Medical Center Emergency Department.

Pharmacy student wins $100,000 in Dr Pepper Tuition Throw

Rachel Burns won’t have to worry about paying for school. She won $100,000 in the Dr Pepper Tuition Throw Dec. 2 at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas.

The second-year student in the UT College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences went head to head with another college student during a 30-second contest and threw more footballs through a hole two feet in diameter in a ginormous soda can five yards away. Burns put 16 footballs in the can.

And she did it live on national TV during halftime of the Big 12 Championship game.

UT student Rachel Burns won $100,000 Dec. 2 at the Dr Pepper Tuition Throw.

No pressure.

Burns thanked her parents and the University.

And she said, “Happy birthday, mom!”

She qualified for the final round of the competition on her dad’s birthday Dec. 1.

Watch Burns in action here.

UT pharmacy student to compete in Dr Pepper Tuition Throw

Rachel Burns is ready. She will face three college students for a chance to win $100,000 in the Dr Pepper Tuition Throw.

The second-year student in the UT College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences will travel to Arlington, Texas, Friday, Dec. 1. She’ll have 30 seconds to see how many footballs she can toss into a hole two feet in diameter in a ginormous soda can five yards away.

Rachel Burns practiced for the Dr Pepper Tuition Throw in the Fetterman Center.

If Burns places first or second, she’ll move to the final round Saturday, Dec. 2, and vie for big money live on national television during halftime of the Big 12 Championship game at AT&T Stadium, home of the Dallas Cowboys.

“My family has been huge football fans ever since I can remember. When I was 14 or so, I remember watching these competitions where kids would throw the ball through the cans to get money,” she said.

“When it came time to get scholarships for college, I started looking at my options, and I came across [the Dr Pepper Tuition Throw] again. I thought this is really cool; this is something I want to try. It’s really a one in a million shot because thousands of people apply from all over the country.”

She took her shot — and scored.

In her one-minute application video, the Holland, Ohio, native shared her story.

“I was diagnosed with cystic fibrosis when I was 7 or 8 years old. When I was diagnosed with the terminal lung disease, they told me I wouldn’t live past the age of 18,” Burns said. “But because of the medical advancements since then, the life expectancy has grown; I just celebrated my 20th birthday.”

Life has been a blur since her phone rang Nov. 10 with the contest news.

Rachel Burns posed for a photo in front of the Dr Pepper replica built by her dad and brother; her mom painted the can.

“A lot of participants start practicing right when they apply. I didn’t want to jinx myself or get my hopes up — thousands of people apply,” she said. “I told my dad and my brother, once we get the call, it’ll be your job to build the exact replica.”

Thanks to a diagram and dimensions supplied by Dr Pepper, her dad, Ray, had the oversized can built in less than two hours, with assistance from her brother, Raymond. They even made the can portable.

Burns has been practicing every day since — in her garage and backyard, at Springfield High School, and in UT’s Fetterman Center.

“We’re trying to mimic the conditions I’ll see in Texas,” she said, adding AT&T Stadium has a retractable roof and likely will be closed. “Practicing in the Fetterman Center has been a huge help; it keeps the conditions as similar as possible.”

The former softball and volleyball player is experimenting with a shot-put style throw.

“You just have to go in with all your heart and trust that either way, this is still an amazing opportunity. Winning any amount of tuition money would take a huge burden off my family. This is going to be a trip of a lifetime, an experience to share with the world, and I’m proud to represent The University of Toledo.”

Twenty college students will participate in the Dr Pepper Tuition Throw, four at five championship games. All are guaranteed $2,500. Second-place finishers will receive $25,000, and winners will take home $100,000 to pay for school.

“I’m very grateful for this opportunity,” Burns said. “Every little bit helps when it comes to paying for college.”

Some say there are no coincidences. Consider these auspicious signs:

• Burns and her family are lifelong fans of the Dallas Cowboys.

• Ray Burns’ birthday is Dec. 1. And Dec. 2 is the birthday of Heather Burns, Rachel’s mom.

• After falling in love with a puppy Burns was training for Rocket Service Dogs, the UT student organization of which she is president, the family brought home an 8-week-old chocolate Labrador retriever and named him Dallas just two days before learning about the competition.

Dr Pepper will cover the cost of the trip for Burns and one person; she’s taking her dad.

“My dad has always wanted to go [to AT&T Stadium]. It’s a win-win for me and for him for his birthday. It’s pretty cool,” she said. “I’m excited; I’ve been practicing; I can’t wait.”

Alumni to be honored at annual Homecoming Gala Oct. 6

This week The University of Toledo Alumni Association will recognize the winners of its most prestigious awards: the Gold T, Blue T and Edward H. Schmidt Outstanding Young Alum Award.

These three recipients will be recognized — along with distinguished alumni from each UT college — at the Homecoming Alumni Gala and Awards Ceremony Friday, Oct. 6, at 6 p.m. in the Thompson Student Union Auditorium.

Tickets for the gala are $30 each, $10 for children, and may be purchased by calling the Office of Alumni Relations at 419.530.ALUM (2586) or by visiting toledoalumni.org.

The Gold T is presented to a UT graduate in recognition of outstanding achievement in his or her field of endeavor while providing leadership and noteworthy service to the community.

Kim

The 2017 winner of the Gold T is Dr. Julian Kim of Shaker Heights, Ohio. Kim, a renowned expert in the treatment of patients with melanoma, breast cancer, soft tissue sarcomas and gastrointestinal malignancies, graduated from the College of Medicine and Life Sciences in 1986. Chief of oncologic surgery and chief medical officer at the Seidman Cancer Center of University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center and the Charles Hubay Professor of Surgery at Case Western Reserve University, Kim holds the U.S. patent for novel research discovery in adoptive immunotherapy of cancer. His breakthrough process takes immune cells from a cancer patient and activates them in a laboratory in order to infuse them back into the patient to treat the cancer. Clinical trials in patients with advanced melanoma have proven successful, with the treatment helping to slow the advancement of the cancer. His treatment process is being used to assist pancreatic cancer patients. Prior to joining the Seidman Cancer Center in 2006, Kim served as director of the Melanoma Program at the Cleveland Clinic. Seidman Cancer Center is one of only 42 cancer hospitals nationwide.

The Blue T is presented to a UT Alumni Association member and UT graduate who has made outstanding contributions to the progress and development of the Alumni Association and University.

Miller

The Hon. Nancy Miller, of Sylvania, Ohio, is the 2017 honoree. Chief magistrate of Lucas County Probate Court, Miller holds three degrees from The University of Toledo: a bachelor of arts in psychology/sociology in 1977, a master of education in community agency counseling in 1979, and a juris doctor from the College of Law in 1988. A member of the executive committee of the Alumni Association’s Board of Trustees where she serves as secretary, Miller is also chair of the policy and procedures committee for Women & Philanthropy at UT. Recipient of the Henry Herschel Commitment Award in 2015 from the College of Law Alumni Affiliate, she is a member of the Dean’s Advisory Board in the College of Law. Miller is a major donor to numerous campus organizations, including the Medical Research Society, Women & Philanthropy, and the College of Law. A past president of the Lucas County Bar Association and the Toledo Women’s Bar Association, Miller was the first ombudsman for Lucas County Children Services. She has received national acclaim for her work in protecting children.

The Edward H. Schmidt Outstanding Young Alum Award is presented to a University graduate who is 35 years or younger in recognition of outstanding achievement in her or his field of endeavor, while providing leadership and noteworthy service to the Alumni Association, University or community. This award is named in memory of Ed Schmidt, a 1942 alumnus and a longtime supporter of the University and its Alumni Association.

Carey

The 2017 recipient of this award is Dr. Michelle Carey, of Temperance, Mich. Carey earned a bachelor of science degree from the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences in 2011 and was awarded the doctor of pharmacy degree from that college in 2013, when she was the class valedictorian. Clinical pharmacist for St. Luke’s Hospital Anticoagulation Service, Carey is an active community volunteer. Secretary of the Toledo Academy of Pharmacy, she is a member of the American Pharmacists Association national new practitioner communications and networking committee. A member of the UT Alumni Association’s Board of Trustees, she is a regular volunteer at the University community care clinic, Notre Dame Academy, Blessed Sacrament Church and Bedford Goodfellows.

Girls in Science Day at UT May 10

More than 140 sophomore high school girls will visit The University of Toledo Wednesday, May 10, when prominent female scientists and engineers across the region will introduce them to the exciting world of science and technology careers through hands-on experiments and demonstrations.

The eighth annual Women in STEMM Day of Meetings, which goes by the acronym WISDOM, will take place from 8 a.m. to 2:15 p.m. on UT’s Main Campus and Health Science Campus.

UT faculty and industrial professionals from Marathon Petroleum Corp. and Spartan Chemical Co. Inc. will help inspire a passion for science careers by exploring the tools of the trade. The visiting high school students also will get to interact with female graduate students in the various areas in science, engineering and the health sciences.

The girls will carry out investigations in a number of areas, including physics and astronomy, chemistry, biology, engineering, pharmacy, and medicine.

Activities for students will include building solar cells; using liquid nitrogen to make objects float in the air; swabbing their cheeks for a DNA sample; building a motor; generating electricity on a bike; making biodiesel fuel; using patient simulators to practice patient interventions; and making lip balm.

During lunch in the Brady Center on the Engineering campus, the students will learn about coding and its importance for future careers in STEMM.

“Girls are just as interested in science and technology as their male peers, but the number of girls that make it to college to pursue a major and get a job in a STEMM field is not growing as we need it to do,” said Edith Kippenhan, senior lecturer in the UT Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, director of WISDOM, and past president of the Northwestern Ohio Chapter of the Association for Women in Science. “Women approach problems differently, and they come up with different, equally valid solutions. We need them in the workforce to better design products and solutions for the various problems facing our society and our planet.”

Students from Toledo Public, Washington Local and Oregon Schools, as well as from the Toledo Islamic Academy and Wildwood Environmental Academy, will participate in WISDOM at the University.

“It is our goal to show the students they have a real and doable pathway to their dream career in STEMM,” Kippenhan said. “It is our hope that a visit to UT for events such as WISDOM will inspire them to embrace science and technology, and turn their dreams into reality.”

The event is hosted by the Northwestern Ohio Chapter of the Association for Women in Science. Sponsors include Marathon Petroleum Corp., Columbia Gas, Spartan Chemical Co., the Toledo Section of the American Chemical Society, the Catharine S. Eberly Center for Women, and the UT colleges of Engineering, Medicine and Life Sciences, Natural Sciences and Mathematics, and Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences.

Distinguished University Lecturers named

Three Distinguished University Lecturers were recognized April 20 during a ceremony in Doermann Theater.

“Appointment to the rank of Distinguished University Lecturer is the highest permanent honor The University of Toledo can bestow on a lecturer,” Dr. Andrew Hsu, provost and executive vice president for academic affairs, said.

“Those named Distinguished University Lecturer have earned recognition and distinction as educators, advancing student learning, facilitating and supporting student success, and demonstrating a commitment to the University’s educational mission.”

The duration of the appointment as a Distinguished University Lecturer is unlimited, and the title may be retained after a lecturer has retired from the University.

The three Distinguished University Lecturers, holding their certificates from left, Dr. Susanne Nonekowski, Dr. Joseph Hara and Teresa Keefe, posed for a photo during the April 20 ceremony in Doermann Theater with, from left, Dr. Andrew Hsu, provost and executive vice president for academic affairs; President Sharon L. Gaber; and Dr. Jamie Barlowe, interim vice provost for faculty affairs and dean of the College of Arts and Letters.

Faculty eligible for the designation are assistant, associate and senior lecturers.

Named Distinguished University Lecturers were:

• Dr. Joseph Hara, senior lecturer in the Department of Foreign Languages in the College of Arts and Letters. He has taught at UT since 1987, first as a Japanese instructor and then as a lecturer. He is the director of the Japanese Program.

“Dr. Hara developed a minor degree program in Japanese, now the second highest enrolled Japanese program in the state, following Ohio State University,” one nominator wrote. “Dr. Hara is well-known for never saying no to a student who needs his support and for his promotion of study abroad, taking students to Japan each summer for cultural and language immersion, as well as developing exchange programs with Japanese universities, including Aichi University. Some UT graduates were able to successfully find jobs in Japan after their degree completion because of the programs that Dr. Hara established and continues to lead. His exemplary teaching evaluations also attest to the impact he has on the lives and the success of students. He received the University Outstanding Teaching Award in 2002.”

• Teresa Keefe, senior lecturer in the Department of Information Operations and Technology Management in the College of Business and Innovation. She has been teaching at UT 13 years. Keefe is the faculty adviser to the Association for Information Technology Professionals.

“She continuously develops new and innovative courses, incorporating new technologies, and providing active learning experiences for her students, including flipped classes and service learning, all contributing to student retention and graduation rates,” one nominator wrote. “Over my 37 years at the University, I have never seen the likes of Teresa in terms of teaching, service and dedication to the betterment of students.” A former student wrote, “If I was asked who outside my immediate family had the largest impact on my education and professional growth, without hesitation, ‘Teresa Keefe’ would be blurted out.” And another graduate noted, “I owe my success to Teresa Keefe. She is an exceedingly wonderful professor, mentor and friend. The amount of dedication that she pours into her passion daily is inspiring.”

• Dr. Susanne Nonekowski, associate lecturer in the Department of Medicinal and Biological Chemistry in the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. She began teaching at the University in 2001.

“Dr. Nonekowski is often the earliest adopter of active learning methods such as clickers and Blackboard chat rooms; she won an Assessment Award in the college in 2014 and mentors other faculty who are incorporating assessment in their courses,” one nominator wrote. “She received an Innovations in Teaching Award in 2015, and she was nominated for a University Outstanding Teaching Award in 2010.” A graduate wrote, “I believe that Dr. N. is truly in a league all her own when it comes to her teaching style, her abundant ability, and her academic perspective. She is not only compassionate and knowledgeable, but also a lecturer who makes learning interesting and fun.” A student wrote, “It is clear that the instructor really knows her stuff, and her passion and understanding for the material had a great impact on my learning.”