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Law professor authors book on Toledo congressman’s influence on 13th Amendment

After five years of research and writing, Rebecca Zietlow, Charles W. Fornoff Professor of Law and Values at the UT College of Law, completed her book, “The Forgotten Emancipator: James Mitchell Ashley and the Ideological Origins of Reconstruction.”

Edited by leading legal historian Chris Tomlins, the book was published by Cambridge University Press in November.

For more than 15 years, Zietlow has been researching Reconstruction-era American history. Due to her interest and scholarship, she helped form the 13th Amendment Project, a group of scholars and practitioners who examine the history and promise of this amendment. Despite the fact that the 13th Amendment abolished slavery, there is relatively little legal scholarship about it. This is surprising considering that the amendment, she argues, also provides protections for workers and additional support for civil rights action by the federal government.

Zietlow’s book examines both this critical amendment and historical period through the work of James Mitchell Ashley. Ashley, a lawyer from Toledo, was a major leader in the Reconstruction-era Congress, serving Toledo as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives and helping to found the Republican Party. He was the first person to propose amending the U.S. Constitution to end slavery and worked alongside Abraham Lincoln to secure passage of the 13th Amendment in the U.S. House of Representatives. Ashley thought beyond the abolition of slavery, promulgating ideas such as voting rights for blacks, civil rights, and protections for non-slave workers, including groups such as industrial workers in the North and Chinese railroad laborers.

Despite this legacy, many constitutional law scholars are unfamiliar with Ashley as little has been written about him. Southern historians painted him as a carpetbagger intent on taking advantage of the South after its loss in the Civil War. He also left Congress clouded in controversy due to his relentless and unwavering pursuit of both Reconstruction-era ideals and the impeachment of President Andrew Johnson.

Zietlow

To Zietlow, Ashley’s work is still relevant today. She notes the continuing need to protect minorities and workers as evidenced by eroding civil rights, dwindling worker autonomy, and requiring covenants not to compete even for low-wage workers.

Ashley also deserves recognition because of the pivotal role he played in transforming the Constitution and government. “He helped change our government from one based on slavery to one that abolished slavery and created individual rights,” Zietlow said.

Ashley’s legacy still lives on in Toledo. Many local attorneys and judges are familiar with the James M. Ashley and Thomas W. L. Ashley U.S. Courthouse, which houses the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Ohio in downtown Toledo. Thomas “Ludd” Ashley was James Ashley’s grandson who served Toledo in the U.S. House of Representatives for two decades. Ashley’s final resting place is the Woodlawn Cemetery, just a few miles from the courthouse that bears his name. In 2006, when the UT College of Law hosted its annual Law Review Symposium on James Ashley and the Reconstruction, several Ashley family members attended the event along with U.S. Congresswoman Marcy Kaptur.

“Professor Zietlow is one of the nation’s leading scholars of the Reconstruction Era, and her new book is a great contribution to the literature on the 13th Amendment,” UT Law Dean D. Benjamin Barros said. “By reminding us of the role and worldview of Congressman James M. Ashley, Professor Zietlow enriches our understanding of an important historical era and provides important context to contemporary issues of equality.”

“Professor Zietlow’s scholarship has consistently advanced our understanding of the 13th Amendment and Reconstruction,” said Kara Bruce, associate dean for faculty research and development, and professor in the College of Law. “This book is a capstone of that impressive body of work and a valuable contribution to Toledo history.”

Saturday Morning Science returns with ‘Twisty Puzzles,’ ‘Green Goo,’ ‘Talking Trees’

If you’re curious about solving the Rubik’s Cube or the break of a pitcher’s curve ball, ask a mathematician or scientist.

Saturday Morning Science is back for 2018 at The University of Toledo with six programs to give the community the opportunity to learn about hot topics in modern science.

The free, public talks are presented by the UT College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics and kick off Saturday, Feb. 3, at 10 a.m. in Memorial Field House Room 2100 with “A Brief History of Twisty Puzzles,” most famously the Rubik’s Cube.

“Puzzles are more important than most people realize,” said Dr. Nathaniel Iverson, lecturer in the UT Department of Mathematics and Statistics, who will lead the session and teach strategies to solve a Rubik’s Cube.

“Mathematics is not just about numbers and calculations, but also about analyzing the world around you and solving problems. Puzzles are valuable for developing dexterity, problem-solving strategies, spatial reasoning, refinement of practice techniques, and intuition for higher-level concepts in mathematics.”

A limited number of custom UT/Saturday Morning Science cube puzzles will be given away to attendees of the Feb. 3 presentation.

Listed by date, additional programs and speakers are:

• Feb. 17 — “Bio-Inspired, Bio-Hybrid, and Organic Robots: The Many Roles of Nature in Robotic Development” by Dr. Roger Quinn, director of the Biologically Inspired Robotics Laboratory at Case Western Reserve University, and Dr. Victoria Webster-Wood, postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Case Western Reserve University, in Memorial Field House Room 2100.

• Feb. 24 — “From Fork to Fauna: Unlocking the Secrets of Nutrition to Optimize Our Health” by Sally Itawi and Manish Karamchandani, medical students in the UT College of Medicine and Life Sciences, in Wolfe Hall Room 1205.

• March 17 — “Talking Trees and Babbling Bushes: How Plants Communicate with Each Other” by Dr. Jack C. Schultz, senior executive director of research development at UT and director emeritus of the Bond Life Sciences Center at the University of Missouri, in Wolfe Hall Room 1205.

• April 21 — “The Great Green Goo of Lake Erie: Harmful Algal Blooms and Your Drinking Water” by Dr. Tom Bridgeman, UT professor of ecology in the Department of Environmental Sciences, in Memorial Field House Room 2100.

• April 28 — “The Physics of Baseball” by Dr. Alan Nathan, professor emeritus at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, in Memorial Field House Room 2100.

“One theme running through this year’s series is our relationship with nature,” said Dr. John Bellizzi, UT associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry, and co-director of Saturday Morning Science. “We’re connected to the environment through the food we eat and the water we drink, and we can also draw inspiration from understanding how animals move and plants communicate.”

All talks begin at 10 a.m. and include complimentary light refreshments.

For more information about the upcoming events, visit facebook.com/saturdaymorningscience.

Researchers assess role schools can play in preventing, responding to teen dating violence

A nationwide study of school principals has shown that while the majority had assisted a victim of teen dating violence recently, most of them had never received formal training in this area and their school did not have a specific protocol for dealing with the issue.

The most common approaches of school principals for responding to teen dating violence found are discussed in an article published in Violence and Gender, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert Inc. publishers.

“Teen dating violence is, unfortunately, a child and adolescent social and health problem,” Dr. Amy Thompson, professor of public health at The University of Toledo, said. “Even if minor, victims of teen dating violence can suffer from major consequences, including depression or suicidal tendencies.

“This study surveyed school administrators in an effort to help inform better practices and policymaking on dealing with this dangerous issue.”

The article titled “Preventing and Responding to Teen Dating Violence: A National Study of School Principals’ Perspectives and Practices” was co-authored by Thompson; Dr. Jagdish Khubchandani, associate professor of health science at Ball State University, who received a doctorate in health education from UT in 2010; and colleagues from Illinois State University, the University of Houston, the Indiana Area Health Education Center, and the Illinois Education Association.

The researchers provide data related to teen dating violence prevention practices by schools, training to assist victims provided to personnel within the past two years, and the most common ways principals assisted victims of teen dating violence.

“Our No. 1 goal is to help school administrators prevent teen dating violence,” Thompson said. “We also want to help school leaders establish policies for teen dating violence and helping victims.”

“This article is truly an eye-opener. According to the authors, teen dating violence has emerged as a ‘significant child and adolescent social and health problem,’ but school administrators and staff are not equipped to address it,” said Dr. Mary Ellen O’Toole, editor-in-chief of Violence and Gender, and director of the Forensic Sciences Program at George Mason University.

“More training is absolutely essential to address this problem effectively,” O’Toole said. “This first of its kind national study will help principals, teachers and others realize their own deficiencies and develop proper procedures to address an issue that affects our children and adolescents in every school throughout the country.”

Professor honored for pioneering academic contributions

Dr. David Nemeth, UT professor in the Department of Geography and Planning, has received the second annual Kevin O’Donnell Distinguished Friend of Korea Award.

The Friend of Korea Award is dedicated to enhancing cultural awareness and friendship between Americans and Koreans and was founded in 2002 by former Peace Corps volunteers who served in Korea between 1966 and 1981.

Nemeth

Nemeth spent two years on Jeju Island off the southern coast of South Korea with the Peace Corps in 1972. After returning to the United States, he pursued researching, publishing and teaching about Korea.

“I formed a mystical attachment to Jeju Island and a fictive kinship with its inhabitants during my Peace Corps years of service,” Nemeth said. “In addition, I found a moral compass there.

“After Peace Corps, my in-depth studies of Jeju Island, highlighted by many return visits, became a rewarding intellectual obsession that I vigorously pursued while earning my PhD at UCLA.”

Nemeth’s research focuses on cultural geographic studies in Korea, which include diverse yet related explorations into Neo-Confucianism, geomancy, economic-growth ideology and agricultural ecology.

In 1987, Nemeth published a book titled “The Architecture of Ideology: Neo-Confucian Imprinting on Cheju Island, Korea,” which has since been translated into Korean.

“This award in general draws international scholarly and public attention to the profound significance of Korean civilization on the world stage, past, present and future,” Nemeth said. “More specifically, my award celebrates the uniqueness and worth of Jeju Island’s remarkable landscape and culture within Korea.”

Fewer toys lead to richer play experiences, UT researchers find

Any parent knows how toys seem to magically multiply and take over a house. Do children need so many toys?

A team of University of Toledo researchers studied whether the number of toys in a toddler’s environment influenced their quality of play. Their findings: Less is definitely more when it comes to creative, healthy play.

Research by Dr. Carly Dauch, left, and Dr. Alexia Metz found less is definitely more when it comes to toys and toddlers’ creative, healthy play.

The results of the study come just in time for family and friends who are picking up holiday gifts for the children in their lives. The research, which will appear in the February issue of Infant Behavior and Development, suggests that an abundance of toys may create a distraction. Fewer new toys might be a better route this holiday season.

When toddlers had exposure to fewer toys, they played twice as long with the toys they had and in more sophisticated ways, said Dr. Alexia Metz, the study’s lead investigator and a UT associate professor of occupational therapy.

As the mother of 12-year-old twins, Metz has personal experience with the proliferation of toys phenomenon.

“I was astonished by how much our home filled up with stuff,” she said. “I wondered whether there was any risk to having that much stuff.”

Metz said she also had observed people worrying whether their toddlers had attention deficit disorder. Toddlers, by nature, are distractible, but she wondered whether their environment might be a factor in how they played or how easily distracted they were.

Metz and her team of graduate students studied 36 toddlers from 18 to 30 months of age. The children visited the playroom lab twice. On one visit, the children played in a room with just four toys; on the other, they had access to 16 toys.

The team charted how many times the toddler picked up a toy; how long they played with it; and how many ways they played with it.

“When there were fewer toys, they played with them in more ways,” Metz said.

In the 16-toy environment, many of the children played with 10 or more toys in the 15 minutes soon after they entered the room. By flitting from toy to toy, they didn’t take the time to explore the ways they could use each toy, Metz said.

Fewer toys led to “higher quality play,” meaning the toddler stuck with the toy for longer and played with it in more creative ways. Instead of stacking or tipping a toy, they began to hammer with it or feed it or hide it. This increased exploration may support development of motor and cognitive skills.

“Today there is the demand to have the latest and greatest toy that encourages a more technological mind. In this study, we used older toys that encouraged more creative play and tested the theory of is less really more?” said Dr. Carly Dauch, who graduated from UT in May following the completion of the study and is now an occupational therapist at the Wood County Board of Developmental Disabilities. “How the children played supported our hypothesis and provides support for deeper and richer play with fewer toys.”

Michelle Imwalle and Brooke Ocasio, who also graduated in May, were the other graduate students involved in the project.

The bottom line for parents: “If your child receives an abundance of toys, you don’t need to introduce them all at once,” Metz said. “Save some for later and swap them out. If they have a chance to explore a few toys at a time, they might have a richer experience.”

This is also good news for families who may feel guilty for not being able to shower their children with dozens of toys.

“They’re not depriving their children of an opportunity for meaningful play,” Metz said. “This is a less is more story.”

UT publishes first research paper making substantial use of Discovery Channel Telescope partnership

The University of Toledo’s partnership with the Discovery Channel Telescope in Arizona has helped launch the UT astronomy program onto a new level. For the first time, a UT graduate student published a significant paper made possible by data collected from observations with the telescope.

The paper on the properties of interstellar dust appears as a cover feature article in the September issue of Astronomy & Astrophysics. The UT research team studied the dust properties present in the Vulture Head nebula, a collection of dust and gas 420 light years from Earth. The team observed the nebula with the Discovery Channel Telescope, a 4.3-meter telescope located south of Flagstaff, overlooking the Verde Valley. It is the fifth largest telescope in the continental United States and one of the most technologically advanced.

In one of the first detailed images of the Vulture Head nebula, the cloud is illuminated by the faint starlight of the Milky Way and couldn’t have been captured in this detail without the power of the Discovery Channel Telescope. Dr. Aditya G. Togi took this photo.

“To understand the evolution of the universe, it’s important to understand the galaxy evolution and how stars are formed,” said lead researcher Dr. Aditya Togi, a former UT doctoral student who is now a research assistant professor at the University of Texas at San Antonio. “If you know dust properties of the cloud, you can better understand star formation.”

The research team also included Dr. Adolf N. Witt, UT professor emeritus of astronomy, and Demi St. John, an undergraduate student from Murray State University. St. John, selected by the UT Physics and Astronomy Department to join the team, was part of the Research Experiences for Undergraduates program and funded through a National Science Foundation grant. She is in her first year of graduate school at Montana State University.

The team chose to observe the nebula with the Discovery Channel Telescope to test a model developed by French astronomers about the types and properties of dust particles. No one had ever tested those models through observation.

The French model posited that certain dust grains have specific properties. But the astronomers didn’t know for sure what types of dust grains were in the nebula or what size, temperature or density they were, Togi said.

The UT team measured the temperature and mass of the nebula’s dust and found that the dust grains in the cloud closely matched the properties predicted by three dust grain models in the French astronomer’s work. The research confirmed most of the model’s predictions and led the astronomers to new understandings about the dust particles that form stars.

They also learned that the cloud had something called “core shine.” The team knew that in order to scatter the light that creates core shine, some of the dust grains had to be larger than normally encountered in interstellar space. They found that the grains were more complex or “evolved.” They were coated with ice and frozen gases and had grown to about 100 times the volume of a typical interstellar dust grain.

“In order to reach this grain growth, the cloud must be at least a million years old,” Witt said.

Access to the Discovery Channel Telescope was crucial to this research. It’s also a powerful tool when attracting graduate students and young faculty.

“To be truly competitive, to have a first-rate program, you’ve got to have this kind of access to a first-class instrument,” Witt said.

UT is scheduled to host the annual Discovery Channel Telescope partner board meeting Friday and Saturday, Dec. 8 and 9, at the Driscoll Alumni Center. About a dozen representatives from UT, the Lowell Observatory, Boston University, Yale University, the University of Maryland, Northern Arizona University and the University of Texas at Austin will meet to discuss shared governance of the telescope and the best scientific uses of the instrument.

The Discovery Channel Telescope partnership has been a boon to UT astronomers and helped put the astronomy department on the map.

“Our astronomy program at Toledo is on an accelerating path,” said Dr. J.D. Smith, UT professor of astronomy, who is planning the board meeting. “We’re being recognized nationally and internationally, and this partnership is a big part of the reason why.”

Researcher’s study of how cells move could lead to enhanced medical therapies

A University of Toledo chemistry and biochemistry faculty member and his research team of graduate students have answered a fundamental biological question about cell migration that could have implications for enhanced medical treatments.

Results from the two-year study have been published in the Oct. 20 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

Dr. Ajith Karunarathne look at optically controlled cell migration using a next generation confocal imager.

“If we better understand how cells migrate, we can target some of these molecules for therapeutic purposes,” said Dr. Ajith Karunarathne, assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, who led the research team.

Scientists have long been trying to better understand exactly how cells move throughout the body. If you can control a cell’s movement, you might be able to prevent cancer cell movement and secondary tumor formation in vital body organs such as the lungs or pancreas. Or you could help immune cells move to the site of an infection and accelerate healing.

In their research, the UT team targeted the cell’s G protein-coupled receptors, or GPCRs. These receptors are known as the “sniffers,” Karunarathne said, because they sense the environment and steer the cell where it’s needed in the body. They also regulate everything from heart rate to how much insulin the pancreas kicks out.

One-third of marketed drugs are used to control the GPCR pathways, according to Karunarathne. That includes everything from beta blockers to cancer and diabetes medicines.

When a cell moves, the front of the cell scoots forward, while the back of the cell retracts. You need both things to happen for the cell to move. It’s called “treadmilling.” Until now, scientists haven’t had much information on the how the retraction piece of the puzzle works, Karunarathne said.

In its study, the research team inserted GPCR receptors from the eye, which are sensitive to light, into cells from other parts of the body. They then used light to activate the receptors and target a specific area in the front of the cell. In this way, they could take a look at how the back of the cell reacted — the piece of the puzzle that’s been missing.

The use of light receptors was an important innovation in the team’s research. It is part of a fairly new field called subcellular optogenetics, Karunarathne said.

Normally, chemicals are used to activate receptors. But chemicals, which dissipate throughout the cell, are hard to control. By using light instead to stimulate the receptors, researchers could target specific, small regions on a single cell. They also could turn the light on and off, stopping and starting the activation.

As the researchers activated the GPCR in the front of the cell, the cell generated proteins. Through trial and error, and by targeting combinations of those proteins, the UT team found two pathways that affect how the back of the cell retracts and that are essential to cell migration. Stop either of those pathways and the cells can’t move.

With this discovery, scientists can now begin thinking about how to create therapies that either slow, stop or accelerate a cell’s movement. Karunarathne said one possibility is gene therapy whereby patients are injected with genes that make cells to produce light-sensitive GPCRs. Tumor cells could be “told” not to migrate, and immune cells could be “told” to attack nasty infections.

Three researchers elected Fellows of American Association for the Advancement of Science

Three University of Toledo researchers have been named Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in recognition of their important contributions to scientific discovery.

The UT faculty members who are among the 396 AAAS Fellows elected in 2017 are Dr. Heidi Appel, dean of the Jesup Scott Honors College and professor in the Department of Environmental Sciences; Dr. Karen Bjorkman, dean of the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Distinguished University Professor of Astronomy, and Helen Luedtke Brooks Endowed Professor of Astronomy; and Dr. Steven Federman, professor of astronomy.

AAAS is the world’s largest multidisciplinary scientific and engineering society. Since 1874, it has elected Fellows to recognize members for their scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications.

“I am proud three UT faculty members earned this prestigious national honor in one year,” UT President Sharon L. Gaber said. “This recognition by AAAS is an external validation of the talented experts on our campus. UT faculty make important contributions to their fields of study and actively engage our students in research projects in the process.”

Appel

Appel, who joined UT in 2016, is being elected to the biological sciences section of the AAAS for her contributions to the field of chemical ecology. Her research on how plants can “hear” by detecting feeding vibrations from insects and responding with an enhanced chemical defense has been widely cited.

Her other research project explores how galling insects trick plants into making novel structures that they then use as protected places to feed and reproduce. Some of these insects are major agricultural pests worldwide on grapes, wheat and rice.

“Plant defenses against insects are mostly invisible to us because they are chemical. Just think about all of the herbs and spices we use — plants evolved that chemistry to defend themselves against their own diseases and insect pests,” Appel said. “I’ve been fortunate to spend my career working with great collaborators to advance our understanding of how plants detect and respond to insect pests, including a sensory modality we didn’t realize plants had.”

Bjorkman

Bjorkman, who has been a member of UT’s faculty since 1996, is being elected into the association’s astronomy section for her leadership in the field of stellar astrophysics and spectropolarimetry to better understand the disks around massive stars.

The massive stars she studies, which are 10 to 20 times the mass of the sun, can have unpredictable gaseous disks around them that change over time for reasons as yet unknown. Bjorkman studies these disks both in individual stars and in larger samples within star clusters to better understand their physical characteristics and the mechanisms behind their formation and variability.

“Most of the atoms that make up everything around us originated in the center of stars, so it is important to advance our understanding of stars and their evolution, while at the same time applying the laws of physics. That is how we learn things, by continuously testing our understanding,” Bjorkman said. “It is an honor to have one of the largest science associations in the world acknowledge our contributions to science. When two of the seven astronomers in this year’s class of Fellows are from UT, that is nice recognition from our colleagues about the strength of our program here.”

Federman

Federman also is being elected into the astronomy section of the AAAS for his contributions in the research of interstellar matter and for advancing the field of laboratory astrophysics.

He has been a UT astronomer since 1988 and for much of his career has studied interstellar gas clouds to better understand the elements and isotopes within these clouds that form stars. He also is a leader in establishing the field of laboratory astrophysics that brings together theoretical and experimental astronomy research to combine observational and lab data to better test theories. He was the first chair of the American Astronomical Society’s Division of Laboratory Astrophysics.

“Studying the abundances of elements and isotopes in the material between stars informs about the reactions and processes that happened in the past that led to the outcome we see today,” Federman said. “I’m proud to have been able to contribute over the years as we’ve moved from modeling to observations to lab studies as we continue to learn more and more about the chemical makeup in material that will become the next generation of stars and planets.”

Appel, Bjorkman and Federman will be recognized at the AAAS Fellows Forum at the association’s annual meeting Feb. 17 in Austin, Texas.

The 2017 AAAS Fellows join UT’s Dr. Carol Stepien, Distinguished University Professor of Ecology, who was elected last year, and Dr. Jack Schultz, who joined UT in September as senior executive director of research development and has been an AAAS Fellow since 2011 when he was elected while at the University of Missouri.

Professor joins editorial board of mathematics journal

Dr. Zeljko Cuckovic, professor of mathematics, has been invited to join the editorial board of the Journal of Mathematical Analysis and Applications published by Elsevier as an associate editor.

“It is an uncommon honor to be selected as associate editor of such a high-level journal,” said Dr. Donald White, professor and chair of the Department of Mathematics and Statistics. “We are proud of Zeljko and are happy to have him represent the University at this publication.”

Cuckovic

The Journal of Mathematical Analysis and Applications publishes 24 issues per year and receives about 3,500 submissions annually.

“Being invited to join the editorial board of a well-recognized and highly reputable journal is a great honor,” Cuckovic said. “This invitation represents recognition of years of my research work.”

He has published nearly 40 papers and has more than 400 citations. He has given talks in the United States and abroad and has held visiting positions at several universities. In 2006, he received one of UT’s Outstanding Teacher Awards. He also serves on the board of the European Journal of Mathematics.

“In addition to personal recognition, I hope this higher visibility will help me attract quality PhD students to our Department of Mathematics and Statistics,” Cuckovic said.

Cuckovic received his PhD at Michigan State University. His research includes expertise in functional analysis, operator theory and complex analysis.

UT scientist to discuss hypertension Nov. 13

Dr. Bina Joe, an internationally recognized leader in the field of genetic determinants of hypertension, will discuss her work and its historical perspective at the University Monday, Nov. 13.

“Precision Medicine for Hypertension: A Journey Through 40 Years of Research at The University of Toledo” is the title of her talk, which will take place at 4 p.m. in Collier Building Room 1000A on Health Science Campus.

Joe

Joe’s free, public talk is part of the Distinguished University Professor Lecture Series.

She was named a Distinguished University Professor this year and also serves as chair in the Department of Physiology and Pharmacology in the College of Medicine and Life Sciences. In addition, Joe is the director of the Center for Hypertension and Personalized Medicine.

Her work has helped identify risk factors associated with high blood pressure, which plays a major role in cardiovascular and renal disease.

“My presentation will highlight knowledge gained from pioneering studies and discuss the individualized approach for future clinical management of hypertension,” Joe, who joined the University in 2001, said. “This journey on researching the genomic and thereby inherited aspects of hypertension has not only revealed novel genes that are not currently targeted in the clinic for treating hypertension, but also led us to understand the rather surprising link between the other genomes of gut bacteria to have a definitive role in regulating blood pressure. I will be detailing some of these pioneering studies that have opened a field of new possibilities in combating hypertension by altering gut bacteria.”

Since 2004, Joe has received sustained research funding from the National Institutes of Health totaling more than $20 million. She is the principal investigator of two active grants from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute totaling more than $7 million. She has published more than 70 papers in peer-reviewed journals, including the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Cell, Public Library of Science Genetics and Nature Communications. In 2015, she was named editor-in-chief of Physiological Genomics, a journal of the American Physiological Society, and is a member of the editorial board of Hypertension.

For her groundbreaking work, Joe received the 2010 American Society of Hypertension’s Young Scholars Award and the 2014 American Heart Association’s Council on Hypertension Lewis K. Dahl Memorial Lecture Award.

“It is humbling to be recognized by my colleagues and peers who nominated and selected me for this honor. Being named ‘Distinguished’ to me is to be recognized for the distinguished work of dedicated young trainees in the laboratory,” Joe said. “I am blessed to be surrounded by trainees and colleagues with insatiable passion and relentless persistence, which brings much joy along the way on our journey to reveal the many marvelous secrets of Mother Nature.”

Following the lecture, a reception sponsored by the Office of the Provost will be held.