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President asks Toledo to share its Rocket pride during address

In her second state of the University address, UT President Sharon L. Gaber shared accomplishments that are building a positive momentum on campus and encouraged the Toledo community to uplift its university by showing its Rocket pride.

“We have so many great programs, exceptional faculty, talented clinicians and accomplished students. We need to celebrate that!” Gaber said. “We need to talk about ourselves as a destination university. We need to tell each other and everyone we meet that this is a fantastic place where students can earn an excellent education in a safe and supportive environment.”

President Sharon L. Gaber addressed more than 400 people who attended her second state of the University address.

More than 400 students, faculty, staff and community members attended the speech April 18 in the Thompson Student Union Auditorium. Each attendee received a UT window cling to take with them to share their Rocket pride on their vehicle or in their office or home.

Gaber focused much of her talk on the initiatives underway to support student success, enhance research excellence, and strengthen UT’s reputation.

The president highlighted a number of programs adopted to support students, such as lowering the cost of a UT education through the Tuition Guarantee program that locks in the cost of tuition and some general fees for four years and a digital course content program that offers less expensive digital texts to students.

The $6 million investment in Carlson Library that was completed in the summer has led to a 40 percent increase in student visits this school year, she said, before announcing another enhancement to the library coming in the fall — a new Starbucks on the second floor.

Gaber recognized a number of researchers for their contributions to advancing knowledge, including undergraduate physics student Nathan Szymanski, who was recently awarded the prestigious Goldwater Scholarship for his studies of solar cell and battery technologies.

Overall, UT’s research program has doubled the number of awards received so far this year compared to the year before. UT has received 233 research awards and nearly $41 million in external research funding, Gaber announced.

“We are proud of the national accolades bestowed this year on our talented researchers and faculty members for advancing knowledge,” she said.

The president did note that the University has been able to maintain financial stability thanks to a number of successful initiatives last year, but asked every individual at UT to continue efforts to recruit and retain more students because enrollment growth is key to achieving UT’s goals.

Building up fundraising efforts also is important for UT’s success. The president publicly announced for the first time how the University plans to use the real estate gift from Welltower, which is UT’s largest gift in history valued at $30 million. UT’s Division of Advancement will relocate to the Welltower property to allow all of its offices — Alumni and Annual Engagement, Development, Special Events, the UT Foundation, and University Marketing and Communications — to work together under one roof.

Gaber’s speech about UT’s accomplishments and the talent of its students, faculty and staff led to a call to action for the audience — and the broader Toledo community — to help tell the University’s story and strengthen its reputation by showing their Rocket pride.

“UT is this city’s only university. We have an important impact on this community, and we need your support,” Gaber said. “We want you to share our enthusiasm. Mentor our students. See our physicians. Partner with us. Root for our Rockets. And hire our graduates.

“We are energized by our positive momentum. And we are so proud to be The University of Toledo.”

Watch the address here.

New director appointed to lead UT Lake Erie Center

The University of Toledo named a new leader for the Lake Erie Center, a freshwater research and science education campus focused on finding solutions for water quality issues that face the Great Lakes, including harmful algal blooms, invasive species and pollutants.

Dr. Tom Bridgeman, algae researcher and UT professor of ecology, will serve as director effective May 14. A welcome reception will be held from 3 to 5 p.m. Wednesday, May 9, at the Lake Erie Center.

Bridgeman

“It is an honor to be appointed the director of a center that has done so much toward improving our ecological understanding of western Lake Erie and its watershed, not just in an academic sense, but in ways that translate into policies for protecting the lake, its fisheries and our drinking water supplies,” Bridgeman said.

“Dr. Bridgeman is one of the leading researchers studying harmful algae blooms, and his insights and leadership as the new director will be important in continuing to move the Lake Erie Center forward, and in solidifying its key contributions toward solving the problems threatening Lake Erie and the Great Lakes in general,” said Dr. Karen Bjorkman, dean of the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics; Distinguished University Professor of Astronomy; and Helen Luedtke Brooks Endowed Professor of Astronomy. 

Bridgeman plans to continue to build relationships with state and national funding agencies to grow the Lake Erie Center’s research programs, which consist of faculty, staff and student researchers, and connect water treatment plant operators, legislative policymakers and the public with UT water quality expertise.

Bridgeman also plans to make the Lake Erie Center the hub of the UT Water Task Force, which is composed of faculty and researchers in diverse fields spanning the University and serves as a resource for government officials and the public looking for expertise on investigating the causes and effects of algal blooms, the health of Lake Erie, and the health of the communities depending on its water. The task force includes experts in economics, engineering, environmental sciences, business, pharmacy, law, chemistry and biochemistry, geography and planning, and medical microbiology and immunology.

“I would like to help this diverse group find a cohesive voice to communicate their research to the public under the banner of the Lake Erie Center,” Bridgeman said.

Water quality is a major research focus at UT. With more than $14 million in active grants underway, researchers are looking for pathways to restore our greatest natural resource for future generations to ensure communities continue to have access to safe drinking water.

“I’m excited about pursuing some new ideas that will increase our research and education collaborations across UT and with other universities in the region so that the Lake Erie Center becomes the core facility for anyone who wants to conduct research involving Lake Erie,” Bridgeman said. “For anyone who loves water and loves Lake Erie, I would like them to feel that the Lake Erie Center is their center. It’s a place where they can be involved, send their kids to summer science camp, or meet and organize for improving the lake. For area students, I want them to know that UT offers unparalleled opportunities for them to learn about the environment, studying our Great Lake and its tributaries.”

Dr. Tim Fisher, geology professor and chair of the UT Department of Environmental Sciences, has been serving as interim director of the Lake Erie Center.

“I want to thank Dr. Fisher for his dedication and willingness to serve in this capacity for the past 18 months,” Bjorkman said.

UT, AAA to host seminar on cybersecurity and autonomous vehicles April 13

The University of Toledo College of Engineering and AAA Northwest Ohio are hosting the second in a series of free, public talks to educate consumers about how smart cars will impact the world.

The seminar focused on cybersecurity and autonomous vehicles will take place Friday, April 13, from 3 to 5 p.m. in UT’s Nitschke Auditorium.

“We understand drivers have questions about the impact of artificial intelligence on transportation, and this is a great opportunity to talk about autonomous-vehicle technology and the work to prevent self-driving cars from being hacked,” said Dr. Jared Oluoch, UT assistant professor of computer science and engineering technology.

Taylor Kia will have a 2018 Stinger on site that is equipped with forward collision avoidance; forward collision warning system; smart cruise control with stop and go; lane-keep assist system; lane-departure warning system; driver attention warning; high-beam assist; blind-spot collision warning; rear cross-traffic collision warning; and auto-ran sensing windshield wipers.

Speakers will include Jennifer Dukarski, attorney with Butzel Long in Ann Arbor, who represents suppliers of autonomous vehicle technology, and Mike Krajecki, director of emerging technology risk consulting at KPMG in Chicago. Both speakers will participate in a panel discussion featuring UT engineering researchers and cybersecurity experts Oluoch and Dr. Ahmad Javaid.

An autonomous vehicle will be on display for students to view inside the Nitschke Technology Commercialization Complex in the Brady Engineering Innovation Center from 1 to 2:30 p.m.

Register for the free, public seminar here.

Director of freshwater research at Chicago’s Shedd Aquarium to speak at UT

Dr. Andy Casper, director of freshwater research at the Shedd Aquarium in Chicago, will speak at The University of Toledo about invasive Asian carp in rivers around the Great Lakes Wednesday, April 11, at 4 p.m. in Bowman-Oddy Laboratories Room 1049.

The free, public event is titled “The Contrasting Ecological Influence of Pollution, Policy and Invasive Species: Long-Term Data Sets Reveal Complex Trends in the Ecology of the Illinois River.”

Casper (Photo courtesy of Shedd Aquarium)

“The Illinois River has been impacted by two species of invasive carp, the silver and bighead, which do not have populations in the Great Lakes,” said Dr. Christine Mayer, aquatic ecologist and professor in the UT Department of Environmental Sciences. “A related species, grass carp, has recently been found spawning in Lake Erie tributaries.”

“The University of Toledo is doing important work on key issues in the ecosystem,” Casper said. “I am excited about the possibility of sharing information and potential collaborations on important Great Lakes concerns, like the influence of urban development and invasive species on our common Great Lakes resources.”

In 2015, a UT graduate student was the first researcher to discover grass carp eggs in the Sandusky River providing the first proof of spawning in a Great Lakes tributary. Grass carp are a type of invasive Asian carp. Last year, a UT researcher also found grass carp eggs in the Maumee River.

Although considered a species of Asian carp, wild adult grass carp pose significantly different risks to the Lake Erie ecosystem than bighead carp and silver carp. Both bighead carp and silver carp consume plankton, and if these species were to make their way into the Great Lakes basin, they would compete for the same source of food that ecologically and economically important native fish species need to survive. Silver carp are well-known for their jumping ability and are a hazard to boaters.
Grass carp pose a risk to waterfowl habitat and wetlands, but they do not eat plankton and are unlikely to compete directly with native fish. Grass carp do not jump and are primarily herbivorous.

Later this spring, Mayer will give a seminar in Chicago at the Shedd Aquarium about the importance of healthy river habitat to Lake Erie fish and the need for tailored restoration in each river. She targets the Maumee, Sandusky and Detroit rivers.

“The rivers and river mouths are a small area compared to the whole lake, but they hold some key habitats for fish, such as the type of environment required for reproduction,” Mayer said. “Some fish species, such as walleye, spawn both in the lake and in the rivers, but having river stocks helps increase the diversity of our ‘fish stock portfolio,’ just like your financial portfolio.”

While the river habitats are important to native fish to Lake Erie, Mayer said there also is potential for invasive species, such as grass carp, to use rivers for spawning.

“Rivers are highly affected by human alteration of habitat and inputs from the land,” Mayer said. “It is important to try to envision what kinds of conservation or restoration are best suited for the three big rivers entering western Lake Erie to contribute the most benefit to Lake Erie fisheries. Each river has unique issues.”

Water quality is a major research focus at UT. With more than $14 million in active grants underway, UT experts are studying algal blooms, invasive species and pollutants. Researchers are looking for pathways to restore our greatest natural resource for future generations to ensure communities continue to have access to safe drinking water.

UT to host Opioid Summit April 10

The University of Toledo is hosting an Opioid Summit to connect UT researchers, physicians and community partners with state leaders to advance collaborations that can help address the crisis affecting Ohio.

The summit will take place Tuesday, April 10, from 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in Thomspon Student Union Room 2592 and will feature speakers who will discuss the opioid epidemic in Ohio and share the state’s focus areas and funding priorities to address the issue.

“This summit provides an opportunity to further current initiatives, identify new collaborations, and connect with community contributors in addressing this major public-health problem,” said Dr. Linda Lewandowski, dean of the UT College of Nursing and co-chair of the committee leading UT’s opioid task force.

“Opioid abuse, addiction and overdoses affect families of every socio-demographic group,” said Dr. Amy Thompson, professor of public health and co-chair of the committee leading UT’s opioid task force. “Our research, education and service activities can help make a difference in the state of Ohio, as well as the nation.”

Charles See, vice chancellor of the Ohio Department of Higher Education, will speak at 9:15 a.m. in a presentation about the role of higher education in solving the opiates problem and supporting addicted students.

Dr. Mark Hurst, medical director of the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services, will speak at 9:45 a.m. about strategic priorities, funding opportunities and resources through the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services.

Panel discussions will include representatives from the Governor’s Cabinet Opiate Action Team, Ohio Department of Health and Ohio Department of Medicaid.

As Ohio and the nation struggle to stem the opioid epidemic, UT’s faculty, researchers and students are creating new, innovative solutions to address and prevent new users from forming addictions; developing methods for greater access to treatment and preventing the likelihood of relapse after treatment; and educating students and peers about opioid addiction and resources to seek help.

For example, a cross-disciplinary team that includes doctors and engineers is working to create a wearable device for opioid addicts that notifies the addict’s sponsor or 911 to indicate relapse or health distress from drug abuse. Also, researchers in pharmacology and experimental therapeutics are designing a drug that targets a receptor in the brain to limit dopamine release, thereby preventing opioid addiction and reducing withdrawal symptoms in addicted patients.

Faculty in the College of Nursing and the School of Population Health recently received a grant from Cardinal Health to promote prevention of opioid abuse by teaching fifth- through eighth-graders and their families about safe prescription drug use and storage.

In April 2017, UT Medical Center opened an inpatient detox program under the medical direction of Dr. Tanvir Singh, UTMC psychiatrist. This is the first and only hospital-based program in the region.

UT’s opioid task force was created by President Sharon L. Gaber to bring together researchers, physicians and educators across the University working on issues related to the opioid crisis.

The summit is among the committee’s activities to advance research and identify opportunities for additional partnerships and funding sources to support more collaborative projects.

New book offers strategies on working with needy people

In his latest book, “Needy People: Working Successfully With Control Freaks and Approval-holics,” Dr. Dale Dwyer immediately identifies a work situation everyone encounters.

“We all know them — the control freaks and approval-holics of our organizations and our lives. These are the people who drive us crazy at work,” he said.

The UT professor of management suggests that their annoying behaviors have their roots in high needs for control, approval or both.

“We’ll call the person who most drives you crazy at work ‘Chuck.’ Everybody has a Chuck, and everybody’s Chuck is different,” Dwyer said.

Dwyer notes that we all have a need for control and a need for approval, but it is the extreme cases that cause frustration for leaders, direct reports and co-workers who have to deal with them every day.

Through his consultations with leaders, both new and experienced, Dwyer identified six key challenges for people high in needs for control and approval:

• Lack of emotional control — impatience, anger management, bullying;

• Inability or unwillingness to delegate;

• Lack of communication skills — interpersonal and fear of public speaking;

• Inability or unwillingness to deal with conflict;

• Tendency toward perfectionism; and

• Difficulty in making decisions.

Throughout the book, Dwyer takes readers through an extensive self-analysis process so they can improve on their own ability to better deal with the Chucks in their lives.

“Needy People” offers self-assessment techniques, explores how control and approval needs influence key challenges, discusses the “myth of perfection,” and looks at the ramifications of these challenges on trustworthiness within work relationships, suggesting some ways to address them — including what to do about them if they arise with your “Chuck.”

Dwyer hopes that “readers of the book will learn how to spot the triggers for control and approval so that we can all improve our ability to work with and lead the control freaks and approval-holics of our organizations and our communities.”

“Needy People: Working Successfully With Control Freaks and Approval-holics” is available in print and Kindle versions on Amazon.com, and through Amazon in 12 countries, as well as through Audible and iTunes.

Dwyer joined the UT faculty in 1989 and is a former chair of the Department of Management in the College of Business and Innovation. He received one of the University’s Outstanding Teacher Awards, as well as the first UT Student Impact Award.

He is the author of the top-selling SHRM-published book, “Got a Minute? The 9 Lessons Every HR Professional Must Learn” (2010), as well as “Got A Solution? HR Approaches to 5 Common and Persistent Business Problems” (2014), both with co-author Dr. Sheri A. Caldwell.

Management expert pens business survival guide

As director of the UT College of Business and Innovation’s Center for Leadership and Organizational Excellence and as a Distinguished University Professor, Dr. Clinton Longenecker consistently strives to encourage people to establish and achieve significant goals in their lives. He has bolstered these efforts to help people on campus and around the world by publishing his most recent book, “The Successful Career Survival Guide.”

“This book is all about helping people realize their full potential as a professional and as a person,” Longenecker said. “My goal is to provide the tools and resources to help people think bigger. This book is a collection of over 700 best practices, key research findings, leadership tools, power quotes, and game-changing career advice to inspire and dramatically improve your workplace performance and career trajectory.”

“I was inspired by H. Jackson Brown’s 1991 best-selling ‘Life’s Little Instruction Book,’ which was a collection of practical wisdom to help people live better lives, so I used the same format and approach in writing this book to help people improve their work lives and career trajectory.”

He explained the book discusses 12 career success and survival imperatives based on decades of research with high-performance professionals across key sectors of the world economy, including “the No. 1 factor for career success and survival in the 21st century: getting desired results for your enterprise. Readers will have the opportunity to explore how to take better control of their time resource, how to implement fundamental practices for improving their personal effectiveness, and specific practices for improving workplace productivity and effectiveness.”

Longenecker is an award-winning business educator, author, researcher, consultant and speaker. He has been the recipient of more than 50 outstanding teaching, service and research awards, as well as numerous industry awards, including the Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year, Toastmasters International Leadership Award, and the Jefferson Award for Outstanding Public Service, in addition to numerous “best professor” recognitions. He also has been recently recognized by The Economist as one of the Top 15 Business Professors in the World.

“The Successful Career Survival Guide”:

• Explores the importance of creating focus and ongoing alignment with the constantly changing demands of your job.

• Discusses how to improve your working relationship with your boss.

• Provides specific practices to help you better understand the power associated with creating great workplace relationships, networks, and building and demonstrating great emotional intelligence.

• Explains the importance of ongoing learning and personal development and the necessity of ongoing problem solving, process improvement, and effective workplace change and improvement.

• Provides a treasure trove of ideas, concepts and key practices for developing your workplace professionalism and character.

“This book is designed to challenge your thinking about your approach to work and provide you with ideas and practices to help you improve both your career mindset and your workplace performance while having fun,” Longenecker said. “It also presents some important research findings on how to implement the key practices that will help you get better results for your employer and improve your long-term career trajectory.”

The guide has some big fans.

John Caponigro, CEO of Sports Management Network Inc., said, “‘The Successful Career Survival Guide’ is a wonderful collection of great business lessons and best practices for everyone who wants to advance their career and be the best person, professional and leader that they can be. Clint has had a career of transforming people’s lives, and this book provides real insight on his success.”

“Clint’s ‘Successful Career Survival Guide’ is a gift to every lifelong learner,” said Chuck Stocking, CEO of Principle Industries Inc. “Timeless truths deserve to be shared and can make a huge impact on receptive thinkers who care to be transformative.”

“Ultimately,” Longenecker explained, “the book provides people with an opportunity to learn how to best develop their talents, as well as how to develop a personal performance improvement plan using tried and true practices that translate into better performance. In the end, it is critically important to realize that each one of us must take control of the factors that impact our career and our lives and that we are all capable of doing great things.”

UT scientists awarded $400,000 grant to study wildlife in Oak Openings region

A team of ecologists at The University of Toledo was awarded a two-year state wildlife grant from Ohio and Michigan to study flagship species of the Oak Openings region to better inform conservation and management strategies.

Using radio telemetry, Dr. Jeanine Refsnider, evolutionary ecologist and assistant professor in the UT Department of Environmental Sciences, and Dr. Henry Streby, ornithologist and assistant professor in the UT Department of Environmental Sciences, will focus on the productivity and survival of red-headed woodpeckers, eastern box turtles and spotted turtles particularly in the oak savanna and wet prairie habitats in northwest Ohio and southern Michigan.

Spotted turtles like this one in the Oak Openings region will be monitored by UT researchers thanks to funding from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The two-year study will include conservation strategies for three species.

The Ohio Department of Natural Resources and the Michigan Department of Natural Resources are funding the work with a $400,000 grant through the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

“Oak savanna and wet prairie habitats have drastically declined in this area during the last century,” Refsnider said. “We are interested in three flagship species of Oak Openings ecosystems. If they’re doing well, the ecosystem is probably doing well. But if the animals are there yet not successfully producing offspring, the populations will continue to decline and possibly go extinct. We want to give conservationists a powerful tool to optimize the landscape and maintain wildlife populations, and that requires knowing not just whether rare species are present, but also whether they are reproducing successfully.”

Work begins in the spring on the study, which is titled “Distribution, Density and Demography of Red-Headed Woodpeckers, Eastern Box Turtles and Spotted Turtles in Oak Openings of Ohio and Michigan.”

The eastern box turtle also is part of the UT study funded by a $400,000 grant through the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

“If the habitat is good for charismatic mega fauna, there’s a good chance it’s right for the whole system,” Streby said. “If it’s bad for one of these, it’s likely representing underlying problems for all species.”

Radio transmitters will be epoxied to the turtles and harnessed to the woodpeckers. They do not inhibit the animal’s movement.

For all three species, UT researchers will be conducting distribution and density surveys, monitoring adults with radio-telemetry, monitoring nests, and tracking juveniles with radio-telemetry when they leave the nest.

Researchers will then use nest and juvenile survival data to determine which landscape compositions and configurations result in the best overall productivity for any species individually and all three together. 

“We want to identify the recipe for a quality habitat and map where nests might have the highest success in getting what they need for a self-sustaining population,” Streby said. “The Oak Openings region is a complex patchwork of wetlands, uplands, thin forest, dense forest, prairie and wet prairie. This comprehensive study is necessary to demonstrate which parts of the habitat are working and inform conservation management in the future.”

Red-headed woodpeckers, like this one on the hand of UT graduate student Kyle Pagel, will be monitored in the Oak Openings region during the two-year study.

Three Distinguished University Professors named

Three faculty members have been named Distinguished University Professors in recognition of their exemplary teaching, research, scholarship and professional service.

The newest Distinguished University Professors, who were approved and recognized by the UT Board of Trustees at its February meeting, are Dr. Abdollah Afjeh of the College of Engineering, Dr. Paul Chongkun Hong of the College of Business and Innovation, and Dr. Joseph Slater of the College of Law.

UT Board of Trustees Chair Steven M. Cavanaugh, left, and UT President Sharon L. Gaber posed for a photo with the new Distinguished University Professors, from left, Dr. Paul Hong, Dr. Abdollah Afjeh and Dr. Joseph Slater. The three faculty members received the honor in recognition of their exemplary teaching, research, scholarship and professional service.

“It is an honor to recognize the careers of these outstanding faculty members who are accomplished experts recognized for advancing their fields of study and who are great teachers dedicated to sharing their knowledge with our students,” said Dr. Andrew Hsu, provost and executive vice president for academic affairs.

Afjeh, chair and professor of mechanical, industrial and manufacturing engineering, joined UT in 1984. He is a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and an internationally recognized researcher in propulsion and energy conversion systems.

Afjeh’s focus is on the development and validation of computational models that are used to predict behavior of aerospace propulsion systems under flight conditions. His work supports the design and development of aircraft engines and small gas turbine engines. He also has been working on comprehensive aeromechanics analysis of utility-scale wind turbines.

“I am profoundly honored by this recognition,” Afjeh said. “I am deeply grateful to my colleagues and students who inspired me and fueled my passion for learning. This honor is also a recognition of the great work of my talented students who knew no boundaries and believed in impossible things.”

Afjeh has received 49 research awards for more than $22 million and has authored 115 peer-reviewed publications. He received UT’s Outstanding Researcher Award in 2014.

Hong, professor of information operations and technology management, joined UT in 1999. He is an internationally recognized researcher in network capabilities,
global supply chain management, international comparative studies, and building growth engine industries for national
competitiveness.

Hong’s expertise is in the implementation of supply chain management practices to build firms for domestic advantage and global competitiveness. Much of his work has been in the service sector, notably, U.S. health-care industries as well.

“This recognition is about the value of teaching, research and outreach of business faculty for the world at large,” Hong said. “I accept this honor along with my colleagues here at The University of Toledo and around the world who have worked with me over the years.”

Hong, who was selected as Fulbright Scholar in 2017, has published more than 200 peer-reviewed articles and three books. He received UT’s Outstanding Researcher Award in 2015.

Slater, the Eugene N. Balk Professor of Law and Values, joined UT in 1999. He is the nation’s leading expert in public-sector labor law respected in academia, as well as by practicing attorneys, the courts, and national and international media.

Slater’s work has influenced two separate fields of study — labor history and modern labor law. He is an expert witness on the history of labor law.

“This means a lot to me. I know The University of Toledo employs many outstanding faculty, excellent scholars and excellent teachers. I am deeply honored to join the ranks of law school colleagues past and present, as well as the amazingly impressive Distinguished University Professors from other colleges,” Slater said. “Also, I am pleased because this award reflects the importance of the field of labor and employment law, and the study of unions, workers and employers, in this community and beyond.”

Slater, who is a Fellow of the College of Labor and Employment Lawyer, has published four extensively cited books and 29 peer-reviewed articles and essays. He received UT’s Outstanding Researcher Award in 2016.

STEMM initiative established in honor of UT faculty member

The new Tony Quinn We Are STEMM Initiative recognizes the immunologist in the Department of Biological Sciences for his work in deciphering the interplay between diabetes and immunity, as well as his dedication to the recruitment and retention of underrepresented minority students.

Dr. Anthony Quinn, associate professor of biological sciences and assistant dean for diversity and inclusion in the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, created in 2015 a We Are STEMM initiative designed to bring high-profile underrepresented minority scientists to UT in the fields of science, technology, engineering, mathematics and medicine as role models for University students of color, inspiring them to engage in STEMM fields of study.

Quinn

In recognition of his contributions during his 16 years of educational leadership, UT has created the Tony Quinn We Are STEMM Initiative that will build upon the existing We Are STEMM lecture series to also include fellowships for graduate and professional education and mentoring programs.

“Tony’s dedication and contributions of energy and intellect to the full participation of individuals from marginalized groups in the scientific enterprise has benefited The University of Toledo and our community greatly,” said Dr. Amanda Bryant-Friedrich, dean of the College of Graduate Studies. “His work has impacted our students at all levels through the creation of a diverse and inclusive campus. This work must continue.”

While battling pancreatic cancer, Quinn co-developed UT’s strategic plan, co-directed the Multicultural Emerging Scholars Summer Bridge and Living Learning Community Program, and led the Brothers on the Rise mentoring program.

“We recently visited Dr. Quinn and his family where we shared with them this recognition. They are pleased to have this honor in recognition of Tony’s contribution to the University,” said Dr. Willie McKether, vice president for diversity and inclusion.

The Tony Quinn We Are STEMM Fellowship Fund has been created to support the initiative to ensure ongoing support of underrepresented graduate students in STEMM disciplines — scholars so important to Quinn.

For more information about donating to the fund, visit utfoundation.org/give/quinnfellowship.