UT News » UTMC

UT News

Categories

Search News

Archives

Resources

UTMC

Dana Cancer Center to host program for managing life with cancer

To help patients and their families handle the many challenges faced after a cancer diagnosis, the Eleanor N. Dana Cancer Center at The University of Toledo Medical Center is hosting a program called “Managing Life With Cancer: It’s OK Not to be OK.”

The program will take place Thursday, April 19, at 6 p.m. in the cancer center on Health Science Campus to provide cancer patients, caregivers and health-care providers information about the resources available.

“A diagnosis of cancer complicates life for the individual, as well as her family members and caregivers,” said Katie Racz, UTMC social worker. “In addition to choosing medical treatment, you may experience physical side effects, absence from work, emotional distress, financial concerns and family issues.”

Racz will discuss support services available at the Eleanor N. Dana Cancer Center and in the community to help patients and their families manage the social, emotional and spiritual aspects of living with cancer.

The program is free and open to the public, but registration is requested by calling 419.383.5243.

UT to host Opioid Summit April 10

The University of Toledo is hosting an Opioid Summit to connect UT researchers, physicians and community partners with state leaders to advance collaborations that can help address the crisis affecting Ohio.

The summit will take place Tuesday, April 10, from 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in Thomspon Student Union Room 2592 and will feature speakers who will discuss the opioid epidemic in Ohio and share the state’s focus areas and funding priorities to address the issue.

“This summit provides an opportunity to further current initiatives, identify new collaborations, and connect with community contributors in addressing this major public-health problem,” said Dr. Linda Lewandowski, dean of the UT College of Nursing and co-chair of the committee leading UT’s opioid task force.

“Opioid abuse, addiction and overdoses affect families of every socio-demographic group,” said Dr. Amy Thompson, professor of public health and co-chair of the committee leading UT’s opioid task force. “Our research, education and service activities can help make a difference in the state of Ohio, as well as the nation.”

Charles See, vice chancellor of the Ohio Department of Higher Education, will speak at 9:15 a.m. in a presentation about the role of higher education in solving the opiates problem and supporting addicted students.

Dr. Mark Hurst, medical director of the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services, will speak at 9:45 a.m. about strategic priorities, funding opportunities and resources through the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services.

Panel discussions will include representatives from the Governor’s Cabinet Opiate Action Team, Ohio Department of Health and Ohio Department of Medicaid.

As Ohio and the nation struggle to stem the opioid epidemic, UT’s faculty, researchers and students are creating new, innovative solutions to address and prevent new users from forming addictions; developing methods for greater access to treatment and preventing the likelihood of relapse after treatment; and educating students and peers about opioid addiction and resources to seek help.

For example, a cross-disciplinary team that includes doctors and engineers is working to create a wearable device for opioid addicts that notifies the addict’s sponsor or 911 to indicate relapse or health distress from drug abuse. Also, researchers in pharmacology and experimental therapeutics are designing a drug that targets a receptor in the brain to limit dopamine release, thereby preventing opioid addiction and reducing withdrawal symptoms in addicted patients.

Faculty in the College of Nursing and the School of Population Health recently received a grant from Cardinal Health to promote prevention of opioid abuse by teaching fifth- through eighth-graders and their families about safe prescription drug use and storage.

In April 2017, UT Medical Center opened an inpatient detox program under the medical direction of Dr. Tanvir Singh, UTMC psychiatrist. This is the first and only hospital-based program in the region.

UT’s opioid task force was created by President Sharon L. Gaber to bring together researchers, physicians and educators across the University working on issues related to the opioid crisis.

The summit is among the committee’s activities to advance research and identify opportunities for additional partnerships and funding sources to support more collaborative projects.

Annual UTMC chili cook-off competition set for March 23

The University of Toledo Medical Center will host its annual Chili Cook-Off Championship Friday, March 23, from noon to 1 p.m. in the Four Seasons Bistro outside the Pinnacle Lounge. 

Fifteen contestants representing several departments have entered to have their chili recipes judged by UTMC CEO Daniel Barbee; Dr. Michael Ellis, chief medical officer; and Allen Siefert, chief administrative officer of outpatient integrated clinic operations.

The winner of the contest will be announced by emcees Monecca Smith, chief nursing officer, and Mario Toussaint, chief experience officer.

The winning department will receive a trophy to display for a year, a catered lunch, and a prize package.

Spectators at the event will receive complimentary chili or vegetable chili from the Four Seasons Bistro.

Match Day brings excitement, life changes to UT medical students

Congratulatory cheers, hugs and tears were on full display at the annual Match Day celebration, when the next generation of physicians opened envelopes that revealed their residency placements.

“Match Day is a pivotal moment in the lives of medical students,” Dr. Christopher Cooper, dean of the UT College of Medicine and Life Sciences, and executive vice president for clinical affairs, said. “Our students work tirelessly during their medical school career to reach this point. It is humbling to witness this day and experience the excitement of our students when they open their envelopes.”

Christina Camick was matched to her top choice, UT, in general surgery.

Retaining top talent in the area continues to trend in a positive direction with 10 percent of the 156 fourth-year medical students graduating in May staying in northwest Ohio to continue their training.

Christina Camick matched to UT for her residency in general surgery, her top choice.

“I woke up a little nervous, but excited,” Camick said. “Toledo is a strong program, and I knew if it was meant to be it would work out. The faculty members are outstanding. They are approachable and knowledgeable. I am very excited.”

Grace Maltbie will go to Case Western/University Hospitals close to her parents where she will be a resident in the radiology department.

“I really enjoyed radiology and would be able to spend more time with my daughter,” said Maltbie, who attended the event with her daughter in matching outfits. “I am a single mom and have been dreaming of this day. Whenever things would get hard, I would just think about Match Day and being here with my daughter. It means a lot.”

Grace Anne Maltbie and her 3-year old daughter, Anna Maria, celebrated her match to Case Western/University Hospitals.

Mike Maltbie, Grace’s father, was particularly excited with his daughter’s placement.

“I work at Case Western Reserve University doing information security, so I will be able to walk to a Starbucks and bring my daughter coffee after she’s had a long shift,” he said.

In addition to getting matched to the University of Pittsburgh in obstetrics and gynecology, Latima Collins also personally “matched” to her significant other when she became engaged at Match Day.

“I am excited because I matched and I got engaged to the love of my life,” Collins said. “I am in shock! I am on cloud nine and thank God for everything that has happened today.”

UT medical students matched to institutions across the country; these included Yale New Haven Hospital, Massachusetts General Hospital and Duke University Medical Center.

Latima Collins celebrated her match to the University of Pittsburgh and her engagement to Andrew Anamanya, who waited to pop the question at the ceremony.

This year, students matched into 23 specialties, with 71, or 46 percent, in primary care fields, and 50, or 31 percent, entering other specialties. The top specialties for this graduating class were internal medicine, pediatrics, emergency medicine and anesthesiology.
Ohio was the most popular state with 61 students matching here. The second most popular state was Michigan with 19, followed by Pennsylvania with12. Overall, students matched with programs in 29 states.

‘Renaissance Art as Medicine’ topic of lecture at exhibit opening

The 13th Annual Health Science Campus Artist Showcase is on display through Monday, April 2, on the fourth floor of Mulford Library.

This year’s exhibit features works by 30 artists — students, faculty and staff in the health sciences from both Health Science and Main campuses, as well as The University of Toledo Medical Center.

“Eastern Michigan University, Livonia,” photography, by Dr. Andrew Beavis, professor of physiology and pharmacology, is among the works featured in the Health Science Campus Artist Showcase.

On display will be a variety of 2-D and 3-D artwork, including paintings, drawings, photography, sculpture and mixed media.

An opening reception will be held Friday, Feb. 16, from 4 to 6 p.m. on the fourth floor of Mulford Library. Dr. Allie Terry-Fritsch, associate professor of Italian Renaissance art history at Bowling Green State University, will give a lecture titled “Renaissance Art as Medicine” at 4:30 p.m.

Terry-Fritsch’s research, which has been published widely in journals and books, focuses on the experiences of viewing art and architecture during the early modern period with an emphasis on 15th-century Florence.

Light refreshments from Caffeini’s will be served during the free, public reception and lecture.

For details, click here or contact Jodi Jameson, assistant professor and nursing librarian at Mulford Library, who is a member of the artist showcase committee, at 419.383.5152 or jodi.jameson@utoledo.edu.

“Allée du Chien, Castlefranc, France,” charcoal drawing, by Dr. Paul Brand
associate professor emeritus of physiology and pharmacology, also is featured in the exhibit.

Satellites Auxiliary’s shoe sale continues

It started last night at 7 p.m. and continues through 2 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 24 — stop by the 43-hour shoe sale.

The Satellites Auxiliary in conjunction with Outside the Box Shoes are holding the sale in UT Medical Center’s Four Seasons Bistro Atrium.

Brand names include Skechers, Merrell, Spira, Dansko, Alegria, Klogs, Clarks, New Balance, Bearpaw and more.

Cash, check, credit cards and payroll deduction will be accepted.

Profits will benefit campus scholarships.

For more information on the sale, contact Lynn Brand, president of the Satellites Auxiliary, at lynn.brand@utoledo.edu.

Call for submissions: Works for 2018 Health Science Campus Artist Showcase

Mulford Library is seeking submissions for its 13th Annual Health Science Campus Artist Showcase.

The deadline to apply for consideration to be included in the showcase is Friday, Jan. 12.

The library is accepting submissions from UT faculty, staff and students in the health sciences — nursing, medicine, pharmacy and the health professions — as well as UT Medical Center employees.

To be considered for the show, digital images of artwork can be sent to hscartshow@utoledo.edu, along with a submission form that can be found with guidelines here.

In the past, the showcase has featured artwork in a variety of media, including photography, painting, drawing, sculpture, jewelry making, quilting, multimedia, graphics, wood carving and more.

The showcase will be on display from Feb. 12 through April 2 on the fourth floor of Mulford Library.

An artist reception is planned for Friday, Feb. 16, from 4 to 6 p.m. with a lecture on “Renaissance Art as Medicine” by Allie Terry-Fritsch, associate professor of art history at Bowling Green State University.

Questions about the showcase can be directed to Jodi Jameson, assistant professor and nursing librarian at Mulford Library, who is a member of the artist showcase committee, at 419.383.5152 or jodi.jameson@utoledo.edu.

Stuffed animal toy drive this week at UT Medical Center

Student organizations on Health Science Campus are accepting stuffed animal donations this week.

New stuffed animals can be dropped off between noon and 2 p.m. through Friday, Dec. 8, in the Four Seasons Bistro at UT Medical Center.

Monetary donations also will be accepted.

All proceeds will be used to purchase stuffed animals for pediatric patients at the UTMC Emergency Department.

A member of the Satellites Auxiliary tied UT ribbons on stuffed animals that will be given to children in the UT Medical Center Emergency Department.

Satellites to hold book fair Dec. 4-6

Stop by the Satellites Auxiliary’s Collective Goods Book Fair, which will take place Monday through Wednesday, Dec. 4-6, in UT Medical Center’s Four Seasons Bistro Atrium.

The sale will be held Monday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday from 6 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Wednesday from 6 a.m. to 3 p.m.

“There will be more than 400 books for all age groups and all categories,” said Lynn Brand, president of the Satellites Auxiliary.

“And there’ll be last-minute gift ideas for smart shoppers,” she added.

Toys, electronics, gadgets and more also will be for sale.

Cash, check, credit cards and payroll deduction will be accepted.

Profits will benefit campus scholarships.

The Satellites Auxiliary promotes education, research and service programs; provides support of patient programs in accordance with the needs and approval of administration; conducts fundraising events; and offers volunteer services.

For more information on the sale, contact Brand at lynn.brand@utoledo.edu.

Preparing medical labs to assess bioterrorism agents topic of Nov. 17 workshop

The University of Toledo Department of Biological Sciences will host a workshop titled “Agents of Bioterrorism: Sentinel Training for Clinical Laboratories” Friday, Nov. 17, in Bowman-Oddy Laboratories.

The workshop will provide an overview of the sentinel clinical laboratory’s role in the identification of primary agents of bioterrorism and will emphasize how to safely handle suspect organisms in clinical specimens and cultures.

Participants will include microbiologists in the northwest Ohio region, including practitioners at UT Medical Center, Mercy Health System and ProMedica Health Systems.

“Currently, very few labs in northwest Ohio are qualified to handle samples contaminated with bioterrorism agents,” said Dr. Bruce Bamber, associate professor and chair of the UT Department of Biological Sciences. “Protocols must be in place for the rapid and safe collection, handling, analysis, transport and storage of samples. Increasing the number of qualified medical testing laboratories increases the speed and effectiveness of our response to potential bioterrorism attacks in the northwest Ohio region.”

The Ohio Department of Health is hosting this workshop at various locations throughout the state to train practitioners of medical laboratory testing to respond safely and effectively to potential bioterrorism attacks.

“There is a clear need for expertise in the area of how to handle requests, handle specimens, identify potential bioterrorism agents, and report back to response agencies such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Homeland Security, the Ohio Department of Health, and the patient’s physician,” Bamber said. “This expertise is needed to maintain a high state of general preparedness in case a bioterrorism attack takes place.”

The event is co-sponsored by the National Laboratory Training Network and the Ohio Department of Health Laboratory.