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Independent coffee shop celebrates grand opening in Gateway Feb. 25

An independent coffee shop is celebrating its move to Gateway Plaza at The University of Toledo with a grand opening event Monday, Feb. 25.

Brew, which is open to the public at the retail center on the corner of UT Main Campus on Secor Road at Dorr Street, is offering $1 Americanos and free drip coffee or tea with the purchase of a pastry from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m.

Brew, an independent coffee bar, is serving customers at its new location in the Gateway Plaza. The shop offers coffee, tea, pastries and ice cream.

The coffee bar is located between Barnes & Noble University Bookstore and Huntington Bank. It moved to Gateway from its original location near campus on the south side of Dorr Street.

“We love coffee, and we opened our business in 2016 because we felt there was a need for coffee shops around The University of Toledo area,” Jennifer Erd, owner of Brew, said. “Approximately 70 percent of our customers are students, so being closer to student housing, faculty and classrooms makes sense. Plus, Gateway gives us double the space.”

Brew serves coffee from Zingerman’s Coffee in Ann Arbor, along with local, made-from-scratch pastries and desserts from All Crumbs Artesian Bakery, 7 Little Cupcakes, Libby’s 17 Second Cookies, and So Sweet Lebanese and French Pastries.

Since the move, Brew added ice cream.

“We’re selling pints by Hartzler Creamery out of Wooster, the same place we get our milk. It’s delicious,” Erd said. “With the ice cream, we’ve added affogatos to our menu — a scoop of vanilla ice cream drowned with a double shot of espresso. Coke floats are coming soon.

“Along with being an awesome local coffee shop, we want people to think of us as a nice, after-dinner option, too,” she said. “We will continue to promote local artists by displaying and selling their work and offering open-mic sessions every month.”

“Brew is a great addition to Gateway,” Brenda Lee, president of the UT Foundation, said. “We are excited they have joined our vibrant campus.”

Brew is located on the south end of the Gateway, which also includes Rice Blvd., Verizon Wireless Zone, Great Clips, Jimmy John’s, Bubble Tea and Domino’s Pizza.

Brew is open daily from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m.

Brew is an Alumni Association membership benefit partner. UT Alumni Association members can save 10 percent at Brew when they show their membership cards.

New hydrotherapy center in Larimer Athletic Complex will help promote health, recovery of student-athletes

The University of Toledo Athletic Department recently dedicated the Hotmer Family Hydrotherapy Center in the Larimer Athletic Complex.

Longtime UT athletics supporter Paul Hotmer made a substantial gift toward the completion of the center, which will help promote recovery time for Rocket student-athletes.

Paul Hotmer, back row fourth from right, was joined by members of his family, UT President Sharon L. Gaber, Vice President and Athletic Director Mike O’Brien, Football Coach Jason Candle, and UT staff members at a recent dedication of the Hotmer Family Hydrotherapy Center in the Larimer Athletic Complex.

“We are very grateful to Paul Hotmer and his family for their very generous gift to help us build the new hydrotherapy center,” said UT Vice President and Athletic Director Mike O’Brien. “Paul has been a tremendous supporter of Rocket athletics for many years. His contributions continue to have a very positive effect on the experience of our student-athletes.”

Toledo Head Football Coach Jason Candle added, “The Hotmer Hydrotherapy Center is a tremendous asset and a major step forward for the Toledo football program as we continue to strive to provide our student-athletes with a first-class experience during their time as a Rocket.

“The generosity of Paul Hotmer and his family will directly contribute to the health of our football players by shortening the necessary recovery time after practice and games. In order to sustain the high-level success that the Toledo fan base deserves, it takes the support of the entire Toledo community, and I am forever grateful to the Hotmer family for investing in the future of the Toledo football program.”

The Hotmer Family Hydrotherapy Center features two in-ground therapy pools that each contain 1,500 gallons of water. One is a combination therapy pool that can be used as either a hot pool or a cold pool. The second is used strictly as a cold pool. They are similar to the Hydroworx pools that were installed in the Sports Medicine Center in the Sullivan Athletic Complex when Savage Arena was renovated in 2008.

Cold plunge therapy is used to enhance muscle recovery by reducing metabolic rate, inflammation, circulation, muscle spasms and pain. With cold therapy, vasoconstriction also takes effect, narrowing the blood vessels and resulting in reduced swelling. In a polar plunge pool, the water is kept at a therapeutic 50 degrees to help control joint inflammation and to stimulate the release of endorphins. Science also shows that the cold water causes the release of cytokines and other body chemicals that help boost immunity.

Thermal plunge pool therapy heats muscle and tissue to increase circulation and restore blood flow to the body. The warmth of the water promotes a transient reduction in joint stiffness, pain and muscle spasms. It also can help to reduce inflammation. The typical temperature of a hot pool ranges from 94 to 104 degrees to relax tight muscles and stimulate the release of endorphins.

Also in the center is the Hydroworx 350 Underwater Treadmill. This is a sports model that is taller and longer than a standard unit. Water can be adjusted to attain depths ranging from one to 56 inches. It has a 750-gallon reservoir tank that filters and recycles water between uses. The treadmill utilizes water’s buoyancy, resistance and hydrostatic pressure to aid injured athletes back to functional activity.

Memorial service set for retired University administrator

Friends of Dr. William McMillen are invited to remember the longtime University employee Thursday, Feb. 28, from 3 to 5 p.m. at Coyle Funeral Home, 1770 S. Reynolds Road, Toledo.

The celebration of life and sharing of memories will begin at 3:30 p.m.

McMillen

McMillen, who worked at MCO/MUO/UT from 1982 until his retirement in 2012, died Nov. 23 at age 71.

The Perrysburg resident most recently served as interim provost and executive vice president for academic affairs in 2010 and delayed his retirement to take the post permanently in 2011.

He was vice president for government relations for both UT and MUO from 2005 to 2006; he played a pivotal role in navigating the legislative process that led to the merger of the two institutions. In addition, he oversaw the legislation in the state general assembly that changed the name from the Medical College of Ohio to the Medical University of Ohio.

McMillen held a variety of senior-level positions at MCO involving government relations, fundraising, communications and affirmative action while serving four presidents. In addition, he was secretary of the MCO Board of Trustees for 10 years and received a community-based appointment in the Department of Psychiatry in 1994.

At UT, he worked on initiatives in strategic planning, sustainability, economic development, and relations with the Ohio Board of Regents. McMillen also led efforts for a successful accreditation visit from the Higher Learning Commission.

Ever the writer, McMillen penned a play, “First Do No Harm,” which premiered in 2018 through the Toledo Repertoire Theatre’s Toledo Voices. He also wrote fiction and nonfiction, including the books “From Campus to Capitol” (2010) and “Sticks” (2000). And he wrote a government relations column, “The Party Line,” for The Chronicle of Higher Education under the pseudonym Peter Onear.

The family suggests tributes to the UT College of Arts and Letters General Scholarship Fund through the UT Foundation website.

Women & Philanthropy offering $65,000 for 2019 grant

Friday, Feb. 15, is the deadline to apply for a grant from Women & Philanthropy at The University of Toledo.

UT employees and students from all campuses are eligible to apply. To be considered for a grant, all application guidelines must be followed. Grant applications are available on the Women & Philanthropy website.

The Women & Philanthropy Grants Committee will review and evaluate the applications, and the general membership will vote to determine the recipient(s). Grant amounts vary from year to year.

Grant recipients will be announced in May.

The inaugural grant, in the amount of $15,000, was awarded in 2008 to Carlson Library to commission a glass sculpture by artist Tom McGlauchlin. That sculpture titled “A University Woman” is on display in the library concourse and has become the model for the Women & Philanthropy logo.

Since then, Women & Philanthropy has funded classrooms; an art gallery; locker room enhancements; a sensory-friendly medical examination room; the hospitality area in the William and Carol Koester Alumni Pavilion; renovations to the Savage Arena media room; computer-based educational displays in Ritter Planetarium and Lake Erie Center; a computer lab in the Catharine S. Eberly Center for Women; a playground at the Kobacker Center; a student-family room in University College; an interactive periodic table display; a Genetics Analysis Instrumentation Center; and the Thrombosis and Hemostasis Research Center.

A complete list of awards and winners is available on the Women & Philanthropy website.

Since 2008, Women & Philanthropy has gifted $493,687 in 19 grants to a wide array of programs and initiatives to The University of Toledo. Women & Philanthropy is able to give substantial gifts to the University by pooling its members’ resources and making monetary awards in the form of grants.

For more information, contact Sarah Metzger in the Office of Alumni and Annual Engagement at sarah.metzger2@utoledo.edu or 419.530.4237.

UT Foundation, Development, Alumni Engagement, and Special Events moving to Dorr Street

Several University of Toledo offices are moving this winter to a new location on Dorr Street, thanks to a generous gift from Welltower Inc.

As of Thursday, Jan. 3, the UT Foundation offices will be relocated to the new Center for Alumni and Donor Engagement, 4510 Dorr St., Toledo, OH 43615 (adjacent to Welltower Inc). UT Development, Alumni Engagement, and Special Events offices also will move to the new center by the end of January.

The UT Foundation offices are scheduled to be at the new Center for Alumni and Donor Engagement, 4510 Dorr St., Jan. 3. UT Development, Alumni Engagement, and Special Events offices also are slated to move to the new center by the end of January.

Mail stop numbers will be UT Foundation MS 820, Development MS 825, Alumni Engagement MS 830, and Special Events MS 835.

All office phone numbers remain the same.

Coinciding with the move, the UT Foundation is also changing its logo, adopting a version of the shield logo used throughout the University.

“Transitioning to a new location seems a fitting time to make a brand change that more clearly identifies our organization as part of the UT family,” said Brenda S. Lee, UT Foundation president. “Our goal has always been — and continues to be — providing impactful financial support for the University and fostering a spirit of loyalty and opportunity for UT alumni and friends. We look forward to continuing our efforts and working with alumni, faculty, staff and donors from our new offices.”

Lee noted that there’s still time to make a 2018 gift in support of UT programs, projects and students. Contributions may be made on the UT Foundation website or in person at the Foundation’s current Driscoll Alumni Center location. Offices will be closed Dec. 24-26, but will be open for year-end giving from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Dec. 27, 28 and 31.

Retired University administrator passes away

Dr. William McMillen, who worked at MCO/MUO/UT from 1982 until his retirement in 2012, died Nov. 23 at age 71.

The Perrysburg, Ohio, resident most recently served as interim provost and executive vice president for academic affairs in 2010 and delayed his retirement to take the post permanently in 2011.

McMillen

McMillen was vice president for government relations for both UT and MUO from 2005 to 2006; he played a pivotal role in navigating the legislative process that led to the merger of the two institutions. In addition, he oversaw the legislation in the state general assembly that changed the name from the Medical College of Ohio to the Medical University of Ohio.

McMillen held a variety of senior-level positions at MCO involving government relations, fundraising, communications and affirmative action while serving four presidents. In addition, he was secretary of the MCO Board of Trustees for 10 years and received a community-based appointment in the Department of Psychiatry in 1994.

At UT, he worked on initiatives in strategic planning, sustainability, economic development, and relations with the Ohio Board of Regents. McMillen also led efforts for a successful accreditation visit from the Higher Learning Commission.

Prior to joining MCO as assistant to the president, McMillen was a faculty member and administrator at Bowling Green State University.

He earned a bachelor’s degree in English from the University of Wisconsin at Stevens Point in 1969, and continued his education at Ohio University, where he received master’s and doctoral degrees in in English 1972 and 1976, respectively.

Ever the writer, McMillen penned a play, “First Do No Harm,” which premiered in February through the Toledo Repertoire Theatre’s Toledo Voices. He also wrote fiction and nonfiction, including the books “From Campus to Capitol” (2010) and “Sticks” (2000). And he wrote a government relations column, “The Party Line,” for The Chronicle of Higher Education under the pseudonym Peter Onear.

The family suggests tributes to the UT College of Arts and Letters General Scholarship Fund through the UT Foundation website.

UT LGBTQA+ Alumni Affiliate to hold brunch fundraiser Dec. 9

The University of Toledo LGBTQA+ Alumni Affiliate will hold a brunch Sunday, Dec. 9, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Packo’s at the Park, 7 S. Superior St.

The brunch is a fundraiser to help support activities and events for the LGBTQA+ Alumni Affiliate.

The cost to attend is $15 per person for ages 11 and older, while children 10 and younger are $5.99 each. Packo’s will donate 20 percent of the proceeds to the new alumni affiliate.

“Proceeds will benefit the LGBTQA+ Alumni Affiliate,” Samantha Marchal, assistant director of alumni engagement, said. “With the help of a board of volunteers, the affiliate funds help to create scholarships, programming, educational opportunities, and social activities for UT alumni and students.”

Register for the event on the UT Alumni Association website.

Friends are welcome to attend the next LGBTQA+ Alumni Affiliate meeting Monday, Jan. 28, at 6 p.m., in Tucker Hall Room 0152.

“Our goal is to encourage a spirit of unity, and we are happy to be that tie between LGBTQA+ alumni and their alma mater,” Marchal said. “This event is just one of many opportunities to strengthen that tie, and we hope to meet many of our alumni and friends on December 9.”

To stay up-to-date on LGBTQA+ news and events, join the LGBTQA+ Alumni Affiliate on Facebook.

UT to bring award-winning poet and activist to campus Nov. 4

The University of Toledo College of Arts and Letters is bringing award-winning poet and activist Dr. Mohja Kahf to campus as the speaker for its 18th Annual Maryse and Ramzy Mikhail Memorial Lecture.

She will speak at the free, public lecture Sunday, Nov. 4, at 3 p.m. in the Law Center McQuade Auditorium.

Kahf

The title of her reading is “I Want Milk, I Want Honey: An Afternoon of Poetry with Mohja Kahf.”

Kahf is professor of comparative literature and Middle East studies at the University of Arkansas, where she has taught since 1995.

Her book titled “Hagar Poems” was described by Booklist (2016) as “Forthright and fearless poetry. Kahf brilliantly transposes the disorienting experience of life in the U.S. for many immigrant and marginalized women with the rich history of the Abrahamic religions.”

For her work, Kahf has won numerous awards, including a Pushcart Prize for her essay, “The Caul of Inshallah.” In 2017, her novel, “The Girl in the Tangerine Scarf,” was chosen for the 2017 One Book Project by Indiana University East.

“We are honored to welcome Dr. Mohja Kahf to our campus,” said Charlene Gilbert, dean of the UT College of Arts and Letters. “Dr. Kahf is a talented poet whose work challenges stereotypes while simultaneously exploring the cultural nuances of both her home and adopted countries.”

The Mikhail Lecture Series is sponsored through the Mikhail Endowment Fund, originally established through a donation from the Mikhail family to honor the work and contributions of Maryse Mikhail and her involvement in educational, philanthropic and interfaith organizations.

The fund supports an annual lecture dealing with Arab culture, history, politics, economics and other aspects of life in the Middle East, including issues of peace and justice.

More information about the event is available on the Maryse and Ramzy Mikhail Memorial Lecture website.

Those who wish to make a tax-deductible contribution to the fund can go to the UT Foundation website.

Women & Philanthropy donates books to 40 TPS second-grade classrooms

Women & Philanthropy and the Judith Herb College of Education at The University of Toledo donated more than 1,300 new books to Toledo Public Schools.

The books were distributed to 40 second-grade classrooms at 21 TPS schools.

Second-grade students at Old Orchard Elementary School were excited to receive new books from Women & Philanthropy at The University of Toledo and the UT Judith Herb College of Education.

Marcy McMahon, the chair of Women & Philanthropy, and Dr. Romules Durant, TPS superintendent, presented the books to representatives from each school Oct. 18 at Old Orchard Elementary School.

“Second grade is a critical year for learning to read,” said Dr. Thea Sawicki, chair of the Holiday Project for Women & Philanthropy and professor in the UT Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology. “We are proud to support every school by providing elementary classroom teachers with additional resources to promote early literacy and allow elementary students to gain greater reading skills.”

This is the second year that fundraising for the Encouraging Early Literacy Holiday Project allowed Women & Philanthropy and the Judith Herb College of Education to donate more than 1,000 new books to TPS second-grade classrooms.

Last year, the organizations donated approximately 1,000 books to 33 second-grade classrooms at 19 TPS schools.

This year’s donation covers the remaining classrooms and completes the goal of donating books to start a library in every second-grade classroom at TPS.

“The gift of a book and its potential impact on a young learner’s life cannot be overstated and should not go unrecognized,” Dr. Raymond Witte, dean of the UT Judith Herb College of Education, said. “It is with great pride that we recognize our association with Women & Philanthropy and their mission to better the lives of children in the Toledo region.”

“The Toledo Public Schools is grateful for the continued support of Women & Philanthropy at The University of Toledo,” Durant said. “Our mission is to create college and career-ready students, and that begins with early literacy. Last year, our students received 1,000 books to be distributed in 33 classrooms, which was incredible in and of itself. This year, we are receiving an even larger donation of 1,300 books for 40 classrooms. We are very thankful for the partnership and also their commitment to helping us deliver on our mission.”

Day of Giving raises more than $700,000 in second year

The number of donors who participated in the second annual University of Toledo Day of Giving Oct. 16-17 more than doubled 2017’s participation, with 3,156 donors giving this year.

Alumni and friends, faculty and staff members, and students came together to support Rocket Forward: You Launch Lives, contributing a total of $717,375.

The goal of the 36-hour campaign was to create awareness of the impact of philanthropy at UT and to increase private support among UT students, faculty, staff, alumni and friends.

This year, activities took place on both Health Science Campus and Main Campus, including a carnival-style event on Centennial Mall with student organizations providing games and activities to raise money for the Student Activities Fund. President Sharon L. Gaber visited Health Science Campus for selfies with nursing students and to spread the word about the Day of Giving campaign.

Gifts, designated for a wide variety of uses, were made to this second annual Day of Giving, during which, campaign advocates took to social media to encourage giving.

“We want to thank all of our University of Toledo students, alumni and friends who participated in Day of Giving 2018,” said Cheryl Zwyer, senior associate vice president for development at The University of Toledo Foundation. “Every person’s gift makes a difference. It is wonderful to see Rockets come together to support so many important programs across campus.”

Contributions will help students launch college careers and complete their degrees through scholarships; help faculty continue research that impacts the northwest Ohio region and beyond; fund new drug therapies and medical advancements to improve patient care; and support many UT programs across campus.