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Single-game football tickets on sale July 17; tickets for Miami, BG on sale Aug. 1

Single-game tickets for the 2018 University of Toledo football season for all games except Miami (Sept. 15) and Bowling Green (Oct. 6) go on sale Tuesday, July 17.

Toledo will open the season with three consecutive home games, beginning with the Virginia Military Institute Saturday, Sept. 1. Following a bye week, the Rockets host Miami (Fla.) Sept. 15 and Nevada Sept. 22.

Single-game tickets for the Miami and Bowling Green games will go on sale to the general public Wednesday, Aug. 1.

Current UT Athletics donors, Rocket Fund donors and/or football season ticket members will have exclusive pre-sale access to the Miami and Bowling Green games during the week of July 23.

Season tickets for the 2018 season also are on sale.

To order individual tickets or season tickets, stop by the UT Athletic Ticket Office, located in the Sullivan Athletic Complex at Savage Arena, go online at utrockets.com, or call 419.530.GOLD (4653).

Toledo to play at Illinois in 2023

The University of Toledo football team will play Illinois in Memorial Stadium in Champaign Sept. 2, 2023.

The contest will mark the first meeting between the two schools in football.

“The Illinois game adds another quality opponent to our future non-conference football schedule,” UT Vice President and Athletic Director Mike O’Brien said. “Over the next few years, we will play three teams from the Big Ten [Illinois, Michigan State and Ohio State], as well as Kentucky and Notre Dame. These are exciting games for our players and are also close enough for our fans to attend in large numbers.”

Toledo will open the 2018 season with three consecutive home games, beginning with the Virginia Military Institute Saturday, Sept. 1. Following a bye week, the Rockets host Miami (Fla.) Sept. 15 and Nevada Sept. 22.

For season tickets, click here or call 419.530.GOLD (4653).

Basketball season tickets on sale

The University of Toledo Athletic Department announced this week that 2018-19 men’s and women’s basketball season tickets are now on sale.

Season ticket plans are available with a variety of pricing options, benefits and new opportunities.

Season ticket options for men’s basketball include the lower level premium blue and gold sections. These premium areas are some of the very best seats in Savage Arena and require a Rocket Fund premium seat payment.

New to the 2018-19 season is the expansion of the premium purple season ticket package to include Section 101 and part of Section 110. Season tickets for this section start at just $180 plus a premium seat payment of $75. Other reserved season ticket options for the men are available in the upper east level starting at $80.

The Rocket men registered a 23-11 record last year, including a trip to the Mid-American Conference Championship Game, and will return four starters for the 2018-19 campaign. Senior guard Jaelan Sanford earned second-team All-MAC honors last year and ranked ninth in the MAC with 16.3 points per game and a 40.3 three-point shooting mark. Senior forward Nate Navigato set a school record last year with 94 three-pointers and ranked second in the MAC with a 42.7 three-point percentage. Also returning will be the junior duo of center Luke Knapke (10.8 points per game, 6.3 rebounds per game) and forward Willie Jackson (7.6 points per game, 5.6 rebounds per game), as well as All-MAC Freshman Team member Marreon Jackson (8.0 points per game, 2.7 assists per game).

Women’s basketball elite reserved season tickets are $150 in sections 108, 109 and the first five rows of section 102 and 103. General admission season tickets for women’s basketball are priced at $95.

The Rocket women made their sixth Postseason WNIT appearance last year. UT defeated Horizon League member Wright State, 64-50, in the first round before falling at Big Ten foe Michigan State, 68-66. Two-time All-MAC honoree senior Mikaela Boyd (12.1 points per game, 8.0 rebounds per game, 4.2 assists per game), 2017-18 third-team All-MAC selection senior Kaayla McIntyre (16.0 points per game, 7.7 rebounds per game) and 2016-17 All-MAC Freshman Team recipient junior Mariella Santucci (6.4 points per game, 4.1 assists per game) will be the focal points of UT’s offense in 2018-19.

Another new option for the 2018-19 basketball season is a youth season ticket price (50 percent discount for 12 and younger) in all areas.

Also, the UT Athletic Department is pleased to announce a ticket exchange program where season ticket members can exchange tickets for games they cannot attend. Season ticket members may exchange a ticket they are not using for a ticket of equal or lesser value to a future home game. Some restrictions may apply, and all ticket exchanges are based upon availability. In addition, exchanges must be made at least 48 hours in advance of the game by the physical ticket in at the UT Ticket Office.

A limited number of club and loge seats also are on sale. Fans may contact the Athletic Development Office at 419.530.4183 for more information or to purchase.

Full-time UT employees and retirees may purchase up to two season tickets at half-price. Additional season tickets may be purchased at the full price.

Fans who order season tickets by the early bird deadline of Friday, Aug. 10, will receive a Glass City Basketball T-shirt (one shirt per account). Additional benefits include:

• Discount to Rocky’s Locker;

• Complimentary general admission parking (Rocket Fund donors receive premium parking);

• Special discounts from corporate partners of the UT Athletic Department;

• Invitations to various Athletic Department special events throughout the year;

• Pre-sales for special events; and

• Rocket Athletic Department emails.

For more information or to purchase season tickets, visit the UT Athletic Ticket Office in the Sullivan Athletic Complex in Savage Arena, contact the UT Athletic Ticket Office at 419.530.GOLD (4653), or go online at utrockets.com/tix.

Rockets to host ‘Football 101 — Ladies’ Night Out’ July 26

UT Football Coach Jason Candle and his wife, Nicole, will host “Football 101 — Ladies’ Night Out” Thursday, July 26, from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Glass Bowl.

The event will be a night of football, food and fun, and include the opportunity to get a behind-the-scenes tour of the Larimer Athletic Complex.

Those in attendance will have the opportunity to hear the coaches discuss the upcoming season, try on the team’s Nike uniforms, meet the coaches and their wives, and sit in on a team meeting.

A wine and cheese social will be held during the event, and participants will receive a Rocket football T-shirt.

Tickets for the event are $100.

All proceeds from the event will benefit the Human Trafficking and Social Justice Institute at The University of Toledo.

To register, fans can go online to UTRockets.com, call 419.530.4653, or visit the UT Athletic Ticket Office. The deadline to register is Friday, July 20.

‘Handwritten Dreams Project’ exhibit closes

The UT Department of Art has announced Leslie Adams’ solo exhibition, “The Handwritten Dreams Project,” has closed.

The artist’s reception and accompanying lecture scheduled for Friday, July 6 (rescheduled from June 1), at the Toledo Museum of Art’s Little Theater also has been canceled.

As a result of the continuing air conditioning and ventilation issues in the Center for the Visual Arts on the University’s Toledo Museum of Art Campus, the exhibition, organized and curated by Gallery Director and Assistant Professor Brian Carpenter, was removed recently due to extreme temperature and humidity conditions in the building. An expert in the field of conservation was consulted and recommended that the work be moved to a safer, climate-controlled environment.

According to Barbara WF Miner, professor and chair of the UT Department of Art, “The Handwritten Dreams Project” is a tour de force and the department is committed to working with Adams to find a time and venue to present the interactive exhibition in Toledo.

Adams said, “It was an incredible honor to be invited by my alma mater to exhibit ‘The Handwritten Dreams Project’ at the Center for the Visual Arts. I am disappointed that it cannot happen at this time — particularly as the debate on the teaching of cursive is unfolding in our state legislature. However, I am committed to and look forward to sharing my love of handwriting, drawing, and dreams with my community in the future.”

Adams received a bachelor of fine arts degree from UT in 1989.

Traffic to shift as road replacement continues on Bancroft, University Hills

Starting Friday, June 29, traffic will move to the north side of Bancroft Street so work can begin on replacing the other half of the pavement between Secor Road and Westwood Avenue.

Also that day, traffic on University Hills Boulevard will shift from the west to the east side.

Traffic will be maintained in both directions on Bancroft Street and University Hills Boulevard during the project.

Drivers should note there also will be northbound curb lane restrictions on Secor Road between Kylemore Road and Bancroft Street.

During phase two of the project, Brookdale Road will only be accessible from Secor Road and Kylemore Road. In addition, the section of Brookdale between Kylemore and Bancroft will be temporarily changed to a two-way street.

These traffic changes will be in effect through August, according to the Toledo Division of Transportation.

Road replacement is expected to be finished by November.

To avoid congestion, students, employees and visitors to Main Campus are encouraged to use the west entrance off Secor Road or the south entrance off Dorr Street.

UT team receives research award at international Biodesign Challenge Summit

UT students who thought outside — and inside — the hive won the Outstanding Field Research Award June 22 at the Biodesign Challenge Summit in New York.

“Apigiene Hive: Rethinking Bee Hygiene” was selected for the honor that recognizes a team that takes the initiative to go into the field and interview experts as well as potentially affected communities in order to find and understand the social impacts of their project.

Members of the UT team — from left, Madeline Tomczak, Jesse Grumelot, Domenic Pennetta and Lucya Keune — posed for a photo with the Outstanding Field Research Award they won June 22 at the Biodesign Challenge Summit, which was held at the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

Members of the UT team are Madeline Tomczak, who graduated with a bachelor of science degree in environmental science in May; Domenic Pennetta, a sophomore majoring in art; Jesse Grumelot, who graduated in May with a bachelor of science degree in bioengineering; and Lucya Keune, a senior studying visual arts.

The four were in New York for the award ceremony and exhibition with Brian Carpenter and Eric Zeigler, assistant professors in the Department of Art in the College of Arts and Letters, who taught the Biodesign Challenge class spring semester.

“We are very proud of our UT students,” Carpenter said. “This challenge is fantastic. It encourages students to think creatively, take risks, and gather science and data. They realize their designs can work.”

“This competition was such an incredible opportunity for our students,” Zeigler said. “For UT to win an award our first year in the challenge shows the dedication and creativity of our students.”

Solving problems creatively is what the Biodesign Challenge is all about. The Genspace NYC program offers college students the chance to envision future applications of biotechnology by working together interdisciplinarily.

At UT, the Biodesign Challenge class brought together students majoring in art, bioengineering and environmental science, as well as peers from the Jesup Scott Honors College.

UT went head to head against 29 schools from across the United States, Australia, Belgium, Canada, Colombia, France, Guatemala, Japan and Scotland. Six awards were presented at the challenge.

“This was an incredible win on a world stage. Our students competed against teams from New York University, Rutgers, the University of Sydney, the Illinois Institute of Technology, Ghent University, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Georgetown. It was our first time out of the gate, and UT took an award,” said Barbara WF Miner, professor and chair of the UT Department of Art. “We are ecstatic!”

“[The 30] finalists were selected from a pool of 450 participants,” Daniel Grushkin, founder and director of the Biodesign Challenge, said. “I firmly believe that they are leading us into a sustainable future with their visions.”

The UT team wanted to help the bee population and created additions for the popular Langstroth hive to fight one of the insect’s biggest foes: mites.

A fibrous brush filled with zebra mussel powder at the hive entrance targets Varroa destructor mites on the surface of adult bees. The insects will clean off the powder — and the mites — and leftover powder will help kill the intruders inside the hive.

And to tackle the Acarapis woodi mites, which invade the hive and lay eggs, the team turned to a natural deterrent: mint, which was infused with the wax frames.

At the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the UT students presented their project to more than 200 scientists, designers, entrepreneurs and artists.

“Our students’ design is economically feasible; beekeepers would just add two simple modifications to their existing hives,” Zeigler said. “It’s a happy solution, and one that could have tremendous market impact all over the world.”

“Eric, the students and I want to thank the University for its support,” Carpenter said. “We wouldn’t have been able to develop this class without assistance from the College of Arts and Letters; the Jesup Scott Honors College; the College of Engineering; the Department of Art; and the Department of Environmental Sciences. We’re already looking forward to next year’s challenge.”

President’s contract extended through 2023

In a strong show of support for The University of Toledo President Sharon L. Gaber’s leadership, the UT Board of Trustees approved Monday an amended contract to continue her presidency for the next five years.

The term of the amended contract is from July 1, 2018, through June 30, 2023. Her original contract was set to expire in June 2020.

Gaber

“Dr. Gaber’s leadership has put UT on a positive trajectory toward the ambitious goal of being a top public research university, and the campus is energized because of the great work underway to support our students and the Toledo community,” Board Chair Steven Cavanaugh said.

The amended and restated employment agreement updates the president’s base salary and includes specific performance metrics aligned with the University’s strategic plan. The president’s overall compensation is directly tied to achievement of the metrics.

The contract extension for Gaber was approved as part of the Board of Trustees’ annual review of the University’s leader in which they praised the positive momentum of the institution.

“I am thankful to have the support of the Board of Trustees to continue to lead this fantastic university,” Gaber said. “It truly is a team effort to work together collaboratively to make progress on achieving our strategic priorities. I am proud of what we’ve been able to accomplish these past three years, and I’m excited about what we can achieve in the years ahead.”

The board commended Gaber’s commitment to student success, noting that student retention rates at UT are the highest in at least 18 years, and the largest number of candidates for degrees in at least 20 years participated in spring commencement.

The new Toledo Tuition Guarantee was recognized as a positive initiative to provide more transparency to students and their families. In addition, UT was recognized this year for its value by several external sources. Schools.com ranked UT Ohio’s best four-year college when analyzing criteria such as affordability, flexibility and student services. The website LendEDU also ranked UT the top Ohio public college for the lowest student debt.

The trustees specifically noted the improved research portfolio of the institution. The total number of research award dollars is at a five-year high. The board noted that three researchers were named Fellows of the prestigious American Association for the Advancement of Sciences, and several UT students were awarded highly competitive scholarships, including the Goldwater Scholarship and a Sarnoff Fellowship.

Also enhancing UT’s reputation is the strong athletics program with two new Mid-American Conference Championships by the football and women’s soccer teams. UT was awarded the Jacoby Trophy as the top women’s athletic program in the MAC and, in the fall, all student-athletes achieved a record high combined GPA of 3.29.

Individually, Gaber was named one of the top five higher education leaders to watch. She was appointed to the NCAA Strategic Planning Committee and the Inter-University Council Executive Committee, and serves on the MAC Finance Committee, of which she will be the chair next year.

This year the University also received the largest gift in UT’s history from Welltower, which gave UT real estate and a headquarter building valued at $30 million. It will serve as an additional campus where the Division of Advancement will continue to build relationships with alumni and donors. The number of donors to the institution grew by more than 10 percent this year.

The increase in philanthropic support and additional initiatives have put UT in a strong financial position, confirmed by the University’s bond rating being reaffirmed by Standard & Poor’s and Moody’s. UT approved this year a new contract with the American Association of University Professors, one of five bargaining agreements approved in the last two years. A new transportation partnership with TARTA will save the University approximately $2 million by not replacing the aging bus fleet while extending free bus rides to students, faculty and staff throughout the community.

As part of the performance review, the board voted to give the president a performance incentive per her hiring contract. The funding comes from unrestricted funds that were generated from investment earnings and allocated to a Board of Trustees account with the UT Foundation.

UT recognizes areas of research excellence

The University of Toledo has identified three areas of research excellence as it pursues its goal of achieving national recognition for contributions to advancing knowledge.

UT’s current areas of research excellence identified by the University Research Council and endorsed by external reviews are:

• Astronomy and Astrophysics;

• Solar Energy, Water Quality and Sustainable Technologies; and

• Cell Architecture and Dynamics.

“These areas emerged from a yearlong review process and were selected because of the highly accomplished faculty members UT has in these areas who are recognized nationally for contributions to their fields of study,” Vice President for Research Frank Calzonetti said. “Identifying these areas of excellence will help promote the University’s standing as a strong research university and create opportunities for collaboration.”

This will be a continual process with ongoing invitations to consider new areas and to update existing areas of excellence, Calzonetti said.

UT astronomers have produced groundbreaking discoveries in the origins of stars and star clusters. They have access to highly competitive time on the world’s best telescopes, including NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope and the European Space Agency’s Herschel Space Observatory. UT also is a partner with Lowell Observatory, which provides guaranteed access to the Discovery Channel Telescope in Arizona. The University regularly engages undergraduate and graduate students in research projects with that telescope.

The strength of the University’s astronomy and astrophysics program was recognized nationally in 2016 when UT was selected to join the prestigious Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, which includes many of the country’s top programs.

Solar energy, water quality, and sustainable technologies were identified in part due to the University’s strong reputation in research, development, and commercialization of thin-film photovoltaic technologies. For example, in solar energy, Dr. Yanfa Yan, Ohio Research Scholar chair and UT professor of physics, has one of the strongest publication records among researchers in his field.

The UT Lake Erie Center receives attention for its work studying harmful algal blooms in Lake Erie and its efforts to protect the quality of the region’s drinking water. Additional faculty members are making important contributions to green chemistry and other sustainability studies.

The cell architecture and dynamics category recognizes the basic science researchers involved in the study of the cell and its structures to better understand cell movement and how that affects disease progression. For example, Dr. Rafael Garcia-Mata, associate professor of biological sciences, has three active National Institutes of Health grants to study the migration of cancer cells away from the primary tumor and their subsequent metastasis to distant organs.

The identification of these areas of research excellence and a plan to advance them is part of the University’s strategic plan. As part of the process to identify existing strong research programs, the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs also recognized spotlight areas of unique distinction, areas of emerging research excellence, and areas of future opportunity.

The spotlight areas of unique distinction include programs that have received national recognition with strong faculty leadership, but with few faculty experts on campus currently advancing that field of study. Those spotlight areas identified are:

• Human Trafficking, led by Social Work Professor Celia Williamson and supported by the UT Human Trafficking and Social Justice Institute;

• Disability and Society, which includes Professor Kim E. Nielson, who is the author of the only book to cover the entirety of American disability history titled “A Disability History of the United States.” UT also offers the only humanities-based undergraduate degree in disabilities studies; and

• Hypertension and Precision Medicine, led by Distinguished University Professor Bina Joe, a recognized leader in the field of genetic determinants of high blood pressure.

Identified areas of emerging research excellence are those with growth opportunities based upon the significance of their work to science and society. The areas that could benefit from further development are:

• Legacy Cities, which includes a collaborative group of faculty members across the social sciences who study how former industrial cities that experienced massive decline are being reinvented, and

• Cancer, Immune Therapy and Precision Molecular Therapy, which features advances in targeting specific genes or proteins for more effective and less invasive treatment options.

Lastly, areas of future opportunity were identified where a group of faculty members are working in an area of emerging importance in science, technology and society. The areas that could gain recognition through focused investment are:

• Vector Biology, which studies mosquitos and other insects that transmit diseases and affect public health;

• Smart Transportation, which includes advances in autonomous vehicles;

• Data 2 Decision, which is the study of big data and how it is used, analyzed and protected;

• BioPsychoSocial Determinants of Chronic Disease, which studies the economic and social conditions that impact health factors, such as the work underway by UT’s opioid task force; and

• Community-Based STEAM, which features community partnerships, such as with the Toledo Museum of Art, that advance the arts and promote continued education. STEAM is an acronym for science, technology, engineering, art and math.

“The University of Toledo has strong research programs across the institution,” said Jack Schultz, senior executive director for research development. “Our goal with this process was to identify those areas with a high level of recognition at the national level. We look forward to exploring opportunities to elevate their standing and bring more attention to these areas of research excellence.”

The identification of the University’s focus areas does not imply that research without these designations will be unsupported. The University values all faculty research and the contributions each faculty member makes in their fields.

Trustees approve 2019 operating budget

The UT Board of Trustees approved on June 18 the University’s operating budget for fiscal year 2019 that includes the new Tuition Guarantee plan for incoming students and no tuition increase for continuing undergraduate students.

The $750 million operating budget is based on stable student enrollment and reflects efforts the University has taken to control costs, such as savings from last year’s Voluntary Separation Incentive Program and health-care savings generated by encouraging employees to use UT’s pharmacies.

The new Tuition Guarantee goes into effect for the 2018-19 academic year and allows new degree-seeking undergraduate students to pay the same tuition and general fees from their first day of college through graduation four years later. On-campus housing and meal plan rates also are guaranteed for four years; however, residence hall space cannot be guaranteed beyond a student’s second year due to high demand from first- and second-year students.

An undergraduate tuition freeze continues for the fourth consecutive year for students enrolled prior to summer 2018 who are not included in the Tuition Guarantee program. The budget includes a 2 percent increase in the graduate tuition rate, with additional increases in some specific graduate programs. The trustees previously approved a 2 percent increase in housing and meal plans to cover increasing costs of operations.

The budget reflects wage increases for professional staff and faculty members who are not part of a bargaining unit. The increases are based on salary levels in which individuals with a salary greater than $100,000 will receive a 1 percent wage increase; employees who make between $75,000 and $100,000 will receive a 1.5 percent raise; and those who make less than $75,000 will receive a 3 percent wage increase. University employees who are members of unions will receive increased compensation as determined by their collective bargaining agreements.

The Board of Trustees elected officers for the 2018-19 year. Mary Ellen Pisanelli will serve as chair, and Alfred A. Baker will serve as vice chair.

The June meeting completed the board service of Joseph H. Zerbey, former president and general manager for The Blade, who was appointed to the board in 2009. Lucas D. Zastrow, a student trustee in the Doctor of Physical Therapy Program, also was recognized for his two years of service to the board.