UT News » UTMC

UT News

Categories

Search News

Archives

Resources

UTMC

Eleanor N. Dana Cancer Center to offer free breast cancer screenings Oct. 19

The Eleanor N. Dana Cancer Center at The University of Toledo Medical Center is recognizing National Breast Cancer Awareness Month with free events aimed at early detection and education about the disease.

“Breast Cancer Awareness Month is a good time to think about having your mammogram,” said Jan Tipton, a registered nurse and manager of the Infusion Center at the cancer center.

On National Mammography Day, which this year falls on Friday, Oct. 19, the Eleanor N. Dana Cancer Center is offering free mammograms and clinical breast exams for women who are uninsured or underinsured.

One in eight women will develop breast cancer in her lifetime, but statistics show that one-third of women older than the age of 40 have not had a mammogram in the past two years.

“By doing regular screenings, we can detect these cancers early and hopefully prevent patients from needing more invasive treatments,” Tipton said.

Women who have not had a recent mammogram or those who have found a lump during a self-breast exam are encouraged to register. A limited number of spots are available. To register or inquire about eligibility, call 419.383.5170.

Later this month, the Eleanor N. Dana Cancer Center will host a free panel discussion with three of its breast cancer specialists to talk about the precision treatment options available at The University of Toledo Medical Center.

The program will begin at 5:45 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 25, and feature breast surgeon Dr. Heather Klepacz, medical oncologist Dr. Danae Hamouda and radiation oncologist Dr. Tangel Chang, who will speak about the latest advances in breast cancer treatment, including the most individualized treatment available today. A question-and-answer session will follow.

“We are entering into a new age of state-of-the art care using precision targeted therapy. Drs. Klepacz, Hamouda and Chang are all outstanding physicians who are part of our family-centered multidisciplinary care team,” said Dr. F. Charles Brunicardi, a surgical oncologist at UTMC and director of the Cancer Program in the UT College of Medicine and Life Sciences. “We are proud of the work the Eleanor N. Dana Cancer Center is doing and glad we can educate the community on the latest options in cancer care.”

The panel discussion is open to the public, but reservations are requested by emailing danacancercenter@utoledo.edu or calling 419.383.5243.

Varsity ‘T’ Hall of Fame to induct 2018 class

The University of Toledo Varsity ‘T’ Hall of Fame will induct nine former student-athletes Friday, Oct. 19, at the Hilton Garden Inn in Perrysburg.

Social hour for the event will begin at 6 p.m., and dinner will follow at 7 p.m. The class also will be introduced at halftime of the UT football game vs. Buffalo Saturday, Oct. 20.

Tickets for the Varsity ‘T’ Hall of Fame induction dinner are $45 or $360 for a table of eight and can be purchased by calling the Athletic Development Office at 419.530.5087.

The 2018 Varsity ‘T’ Hall of Fame inductees are:

Lurley Archambeau, football, 1963 to 1965. He was a three-year starter, playing in the first three years of legendary Rocket Coach Frank Lauterbur’s tenure. In his sophomore and junior seasons, Archambeau started on both the offensive and defensive lines, one of the last two-way players in UT history. He also played on all special teams, meaning he did not come off the field during games. As a senior, Archambeau was the starting center on a team that went 5-5. After graduation, Archambeau was drafted in the 17th round by the Atlanta Falcons, but an injury ended his football career. After graduation, he attended medical school and became the first president of the first class of the former Medical College of Ohio. He has been in private psychiatry practice in Toledo for the past 43 years and has served his alma mater as a counselor for Rocket student-athletes for four decades.

Andy Boyd, football, 1998 to 2001. He was a walk-on who became a four-year starter at safety. During his collegiate career, Boyd always seemed to make the big play in the biggest games. Boyd totaled 314 tackles and 10 interceptions. He made the Mid-American Conference Academic Honor Roll in 1999, 2000 and 2001. During his junior year in 2000, he also was named All-MAC by the Sporting News. Boyd also was named UT’s Most Outstanding Defensive back in 1999, 2000 and 2001. During Boyd’s time at UT, the Rockets had a 33-13 record (22-8 MAC) and won MAC West Division titles in 1998, 2000 and 2001. In Boyd’s senior year, the Rockets won the MAC Championship and 2001 Motor City Bowl. He had 76 tackles and three interceptions as a redshirt freshman in 1998, making the Football News’ First-Team Freshman All-American squad and Football News’ All-MAC First-Team. He also received the Norman Cohen award for UT’s Most Outstanding Freshman football player in 1998. His biggest play came in the fourth quarter with an interception against Central Michigan that set up the game-winning field goal to help Toledo take the MAC West Division title. Boyd had 61 tackles and three interceptions as a sophomore, and 95 tackles and three picks as a junior in 2000. That 2000 team went 10-1 and was one of the strongest defensive teams ever at UT, racking up three shutouts and holding opponents to 14 points or fewer in seven games. Boyd made the game-saving tackle on the final play in a 31-26 defeat of Tony Romo and Eastern Illinois that season. In 2001, Boyd was named a team captain. He had 82 tackles and one interception. He broke up the potential game-winning pass in the end zone on fourth down to clinch Toledo’s 23-16 victory over Cincinnati in the 2001 Motor City Bowl. After graduation, Boyd served the Rockets as a volunteer coach (2002), a graduate assistant coach (2003 to 2004), and assistant coach (2005 to 2009) and director of high school relations (2010). While on the coaching staff, Boyd recruited First-Team All-MAC players Barry Church, Archie Donald, Jermaine Robinson and Eric Page. Church and Page would go on to become All-Americans. Boyd went into private business in 2010 and returned to the program as color commentator on Rocket football broadcasts from 2011 to 2015.

Sean Dobson
, baseball, 2001 to 2004. He made First-Team All-MAC, First-Team All-Region and was named an All-American by College Baseball Insider.com in 2004. He hit .394 that season and set UT records for total bases (152), RBIs (63) and doubles (23), while also scoring 60 runs. He led the team in hitting in 2002 with a .387 average, knocking in 34 runs and scoring 33. In 2003, he hit .367 and led the team with 60 runs scored. Dobson finished his career as UT’s leader in runs, hits and doubles. He ranks second in batting average (.371), third in runs (159) and hits (249), fourth in total bases (356), tied for fourth in doubles (46), and seventh in RBI (131). An outfielder, Dobson was drafted by the St. Louis Cardinals in the 40th round of the 2004 Major League Baseball draft.

Ari Fisher, women’s track and field/cross country, 2008 to 2012. Fisher made All-MAC six times in her career as a distance runner, three times in cross country and three times in track and field. She is one of only five runners in MAC history to win back-to-back cross country titles, achieving that feat in 2009 and 2010. She qualified for the NCAA Cross Country Championship Meet three times in her career, earning All-America honors in 2010. Fisher won the individual title as a sophomore in 2009, pacing UT to a second-place finish. She then took ninth place at the NCAA Regionals and qualified for her first NCAA Championship Meet. A year later, she won the MAC title again, leading the Rockets to a MAC title. She was third at the NCAA Regionals and 26th at the NCAA Championship Meet. In 2011, Fisher came in third place at the MAC Championships as UT again won the team title. She was 17th at the NCAA Regionals and 76th at the NCAA Championship Meet, helping UT to its highest national finish ever (21st place). Injuries hampered her track career, but she was named the league’s Outstanding Distance Runner at the 2010 Indoor Championship when she won the 5K by more than 26 seconds. In 2011, she set the MAC record in the 5K at the Iowa State meet. Her time of 16:04.56 was one of the top 10 fastest times in the world that year. She was one of the favorites to win the 5K at the NCAA Indoor Championships that year, but an injury forced her to withdraw from the race. In 2012, she won the 10K at the MAC Outdoor Championships.

Laura Lindsay, women’s swimming and diving, 2008 to 2011. She was a two-time All-American and three-time All-MAC swimmer who helped lead Toledo to MAC Championships in 2010 and 2012. She earned All-America honors in the breaststroke in 2011 and 2012, the only Rocket woman swimmer to make All-America twice in her career. In 2012, Lindsay swam the fifth fastest time at the NCAA Championships in the 100-yard breaststroke, swimming in the B final and winning the event. She also swam the 200-yard breaststroke at the NCAA Championships twice, making her a four-time NCAA qualifier. Lindsay set three MAC records in the breaststroke and still holds two all-time UT individual records, as well as the MAC record in the 200 breast (2:09.72). Over her career, Lindsay won six MAC titles, one each in the 100 and 200 breaststroke, and four in medley relays. As a sophomore, Lindsay was part of the MAC Championship 200- and 400-medley relay teams, earning second-team all-conference. A year later, Lindsay finished in second place in both the 100- and 200-breaststroke, taking home First-Team All-MAC honors. As a senior, she won both of those races at the MAC Championships, as well as participating in the 200- and 400-medley relay teams that won league titles. Lindsay, who was named Toledo’s team MVP in 2011 and 2012, was a USA Olympic top 10 qualifier in the 100- and 200-breaststroke in 2012, and top 25 qualifier in 2016.

Jared Miller, men’s tennis, 2005 to 2009. He was a four-time All-MAC tennis player and three-time team captain during his collegiate career. His overall record was 128-108, including a 42-28 mark at No.1 singles and No. 1 doubles as a senior. He earned a spot on the All-MAC Tournament Team in 2008 and 2009. In his senior year, Miller helped lead the Rockets to the MAC Tournament title match, their best finish in 36 years, and was ranked No. 8 in doubles in the Midwest Region. Miller was a three-time Academic All-MAC choice and was twice named MAC Male Scholar-Athlete of the Week. In 2009, he earned the MAC Men’s Tennis Senior Sportsmanship Award and the Intercollegiate Tennis Association Division I Men’s Midwest Arthur Ashe Sportsmanship Award. Miller nabbed numerous team awards, including Newcomer of the Year (2005-06); Most Improved Player (2005-06 and 2006-07); Team Leadership Award (2006-07, 2007-08, 2008-09) and Most Valuable Player (all four years). In 2009, Miller was voted UT’s Most Valuable Male Senior by the UT Student-Athlete Advisory Committee. In 2009, he was honored for having the highest GPA among all UT male student-athletes. Miller graduated with a bachelor’s degree in chemistry with concentration in biochemistry. He went to medical school and works in general pediatrics and primary care sports medicine with St. Vincent Medical Group in Kokomo, Ind.

Eric Page, football, 2009 to 2011. Page’s 306 receptions are the most in Toledo history and the 12th most in NCAA history. He also leads Toledo with 3,446 receiving yards. He holds the single-season mark for catches, snagging 125 passes as a junior in 2011, and ranks first all-time in career kickoff return average (27.3). Page was a three-time All-MAC selection who earned first-team All-America honors as a kickoff returner in 2010, a year in which he averaged 31.1 yards per return and scored three TDs. In 2009, Page led the nation’s freshmen with 82 receptions and 1,159 receiving yards. He earned second-team All-MAC honors and was named a Freshman All-American by Phil Steele and College Football News. As a sophomore, Page caught 99 passes and was named First-Team All-MAC as both a receiver and kickoff returner. He was selected by Walter Camp and the Sporting News as a First-Team All-American at kickoff returner, the first Rocket to make first-team on a major All-America team since Gene Swick in 1975. He also was named MAC Special Teams Player of the Year and the National Kickoff Returner of the Year by College Football Performance Awards. In his junior season, Page became only the third person in NCAA Football Bowl Subdivision history to make First-Team All-League at three positions: wide receiver, kickoff returner and punt returner. He shattered the UT reception mark by catching 125 passes and was one of four national finalists for the Paul Hornung Award, given annually to the nation’s most versatile player. He set the UT record and tied Randy Moss’ MAC record when he caught five TD passes in one game vs. Northern Illinois in 2011. At the end of his college career, he was tied for the most career receptions by any player in MAC history.

Lena Richards-Crider, softball, 1995 to 1996. She is a two-time First-Team All-MAC selection. As a junior in 1995, she led the Rockets in nine categories: slugging percentage (.439), runs (40), hits, (69), at-bats (212 — which ties for fifth place in MAC history), doubles (13), sacrifices (18), total bases (93), stolen bases (12) and home runs (3). These impressive season stats helped her earn a spot on the First-Team All-MAC and First-Team All-Mideast Region lists. She was the MAC’s Hitter of the Week and was nominated for National Hitter of the Week after batting .600 (12 for 20) with seven RBI, four runs scored, three sacrifices, two doubles, and a grand slam over six games against No. 6 Michigan and Eastern Michigan (1995). She also pitched an 8-0 shutout over Eastern Michigan during that same stretch. In 1996, Richards-Crider made First-Team All-MAC again. She was named MAC Co-Hitter of the Week April 15 after hitting .692 (9 for 13) with two runs, one double, and a pair of stolen bases. Richards-Crider is vice president of development and marketing for A Kid Again, a nonprofit organization in Columbus, Ohio, that works to foster hope, happiness and healing for families raising children with life-threatening illnesses.

Naama Shafir, women’s basketball, 2008 to 2013. She was a four-time All-MAC selection and is one of only two players (Kim Knuth) in program history to earn all-conference accolades on four occasions. Shafir wrapped up her collegiate career ranked first in UT annals in assists (722, third most in MAC history), minutes played (4,218), games played (139) and games started (139). She also ranked second in free-throw attempts (696), third in steals (227) and made free throws (538), fourth in field-goal attempts (1,476), and fifth in points (1,874). Additionally, Shafir was sixth in field goals made (601), seventh in free-throw percentage (.773), and tied for ninth in scoring average (13.5 points per game). As a freshman, Shafir averaged 11.7 points and 4.5 assists, earning honorable mention All-MAC honors. A year later, she earned second-team all-league honors, averaging 14.3 points and 6.7 assists, leading UT to the MAC Championship title game for the first time since 2001. As a junior in the 2010-11 season, Shafir averaged 15.3 points and 5.1 assists, earning First-Team All-MAC honors. The Rockets finished in first place in the MAC that year and went on to win the WNIT Championship. She was named MVP of the tournament, scoring 40 points against USC in the championship game, a 76-68 Rocket victory before a record crowd in Savage Arena. Shafir played in only four games in 2011-12 due to a knee injury, but came back in 2012-13 to lead UT to a 29-4 record (15-1 MAC). She once again earned First-Team All-MAC honors, averaging 12.8 points and 4.6 assists. She was runner-up for MAC Player of the Year and a regional finalist for the Women’s Basketball Coaches Association’s All-America Team. An excellent student, Shafir earned Academic All-MAC honors three times. She was part of the winningest class in school history, helping UT post a 107-31 overall ledger and a 54-10 MAC mark, with two MAC regular-season titles (2010-11, 2012-13), and four-consecutive MAC West-Division crowns, as well as advancing to the postseason each year. After graduation, Shafir returned to her native Israel, where she has played professional basketball for Elitzur Ramla, Maccabi Ramat Hen and Maccabi Bnot Ashdod.

$1 million gift from couple to expand UT research into pancreatic cancer

Toledo businessman Hal Fetterman and his wife, Susan Fetterman, have pledged $1 million to The University of Toledo to fund new research into treatments for pancreatic cancer, the third leading cause of cancer death in the United States.

The donation is in honor of Hal Fetterman’s sister, Joyce Schwyn, and three close friends who lost their lives to pancreatic cancer.

Hal Fetterman, center, was thanked last week by Dr. Christopher Cooper, executive vice president of clinical affairs and dean of the College of Medicine and Life Sciences, and President Sharon L. Gaber after signing a pledge to give the University $1 million to research pancreatic cancer treatments.

“They were the ones who inspired me to go in this particular direction,” Fetterman said. “There are people passing away from pancreatic cancer all the time. The ultimate goal of this gift would be a cure for the disease.”

The Fetterman’s donation will establish the UT Medical Center Pancreatic Cancer Research Innovation Fund. Half of the gift will be dedicated to recruiting a top-tier faculty researcher to the UT College of Medicine and Life Sciences. The remaining $500,000 will be split between covering the costs of an upcoming clinical drug trial at UT Medical Center and supporting a grant competition among faculty cancer researchers.

“The University of Toledo is grateful for the incredible generosity of Hal and Susan Fetterman,” UT President Sharon L. Gaber said. “The Fettermans have been loyal supporters of UT for years, and this new investment in the University will support important advances in medical care.”

Pancreatic cancer is relatively rare accounting for just 3 percent of all new cancer cases in the United States, but it is to blame for 7 percent of all cancer deaths. According to the National Cancer Institute, only lung cancer and colon cancer kill more Americans than pancreatic cancer.

Dr. F. Charles Brunicardi, the John Howard Endowed Professor of Pancreatic Surgery and director of the cancer program in the College of Medicine and Life Sciences, said there is already promising research being done at UT, and the Fettermans’ gift will take it to the next step.

“I’m deeply honored by the Fettermans’ generosity and their devotion toward finding better treatments for pancreatic cancer,” Brunicardi said. “We feel that we’re on the verge of a big breakthrough. We can cure mice of pancreatic cancer. What we need to do now is translate that into clinical trials, and this grant will allow us to do that.”

Fetterman felt it was important that someone make a sizeable donation to draw more attention to the cause and hopefully additional resources to advance treatment options.

“Somebody’s got to break the ice. I think that more people need to get involved with things like this,” Fetterman said. “It’s not necessarily wanting to leave a legacy, but I can’t take it with me. God’s been good to me. I didn’t go to college, and I didn’t have wealthy parents. I’m basically a farm boy from out in Fulton County. I want to do what I can to help people have a better life.”

The Fettermans are longtime supporters of UT. In 2007, the couple donated $1 million to the UT Athletic Department to build an indoor multi-sport practice facility that would ultimately become the Fetterman Training Center. They also established the Scott Raymond Fetterman Memorial Scholarship Fund in 1996 for UT engineering students.

Office of Diversity and Inclusion adds new location on Health Science Campus

The Office of Diversity and Inclusion has expanded to include a second location on The University of Toledo’s Health Science Campus.

The new office is located in Mulford Library Room 128. Currently, the office is staffed three days a week — Monday, Thursday and Friday.

“We are excited to be able to support faculty, staff, students and community members who work and utilize services on the Health Science Campus,” said Jennifer Pizio, director of the Office of Diversity and Inclusion. “It’s part of our mission to make sure we reach all of our UT constituents and partners. In the coming months, we’ll be developing new programming specific to the needs of the Health Science Campus.”

The Office of Diversity and Inclusion was established in 2016 following the development of UT’s Strategic Diversity Plan. The mission of the office is to ensure every member of the UT community feels included, respected and free from discrimination. It also works to promote a diverse and culturally aware environment that prepares students for success in today’s global world.

Pizio said it was important that the office establish a physical presence at Health Science Campus for those studying and working there. A new Health Science Campus Diversity and Inclusion Committee also meets monthly to discuss specific needs and programming for faculty, many of whom have dual roles as both instructors and clinicians, and students who are juggling classes and clinical practicums.

“The Health Science Campus has a unique set of challenges and exciting opportunities housing both a health-care and higher education institution under the UT umbrella,” she said.

The Office of Diversity and Inclusion also will bring some of its regular programing over from Main Campus, such as “Constructive Dialogue: Navigating Difficult Conversations in the Classroom.”

The hourlong discussion series helps guide faculty through conversations about challenging topics such as race, gender and sexual orientation. Upcoming sessions will take place Tuesday, Oct. 2 and Nov. 6, on Main Campus in Carlson Library Room 1109 and Thursday, Oct. 4 and Nov. 8, on Health Science Campus in Mulford Library Room 520. All sessions are from 1 to 2 p.m.

To RSVP for any of these sessions, email diversity@utoledo.edu. Both the Main Campus and Health Science Campus locations also can be reached at 419.530.2260.

Fall gardening topic of Satellites’ luncheon Oct. 2

“Mum’s the Word: Medicine for the Fall Garden — Inside or Out” will be the topic at the Satellites Auxiliary’s luncheon Tuesday, Oct. 2.

The talk will be given by Theresa Hoen, master gardener from Hoen’s Garden Center and Landscaping in Holland, Ohio.

Hoen

“Theresa is an excellent speaker and will bring hands-on items and her fall know-how tidbits,” Lynn Band, president of the Satellites, said.

The luncheon will be held at noon in Collier Building Room 1050.

Those who attend may bring their own lunches to the free event, or they may pay $7 — $5 for students — for a box lunch that will include a beverage and specialty dessert.

Cash or check payable to the Satellites Auxiliary will be accepted. Complimentary valet service will be available for the event.

Those who attend are asked to bring a stuffed animal for pediatric patients at UT Medical Center.

The Satellites Auxiliary is a volunteer group designed to promote education, research and service programs; provide support of patient programs in accordance with the needs and approval of administration; conduct fundraising events; and provide services.

RSVPs are requested by Sunday, Sept. 30. Call Ray or Donna Darr at 419.382.0054; Carol Okenka at 419.654.5326; or Mary Jane Kill at 419.381.1425.

Opioid epidemic’s impact on older adults topic of upcoming UT, BGSU seminar

The University of Toledo is partnering with Bowling Green State University’s Optimal Aging Institute, the Wood County Committee on Aging and the Area Office on Aging of Northwestern Ohio to hold a town hall discussion on how the opioid crisis is affecting older adults and what the community can do to help.

The program, called Opioid Misuse and Addiction Among Older Adults, will be held Friday, Oct. 5, from 7:15 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Penta Career Center in Perrysburg.

Among the scheduled speakers will be Lance Robertson, assistant secretary for aging at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Opioid abuse is often seen as a problem that only affects young adults, but experts say misuse among older Americans is a real and rapidly growing concern.

“We don’t think of it as much in older adult populations, and it’s probably not as prevalent, but it certainly is a problem that exists and needs to be addressed,” said Dr. Victoria Steiner, associate professor in the UT School of Population Health and assistant director of the Center for Successful Aging.

Overdose incidents among older Americans are rising sharply. Earlier this year, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported the number of emergency room visits for suspected opioid overdoses among those aged 35 to 54 increased by 37 percent. Among those 55 or older, ER visits were up by 32 percent. More than 44 percent of overdose deaths in 2016 occurred in those 45 and older, the CDC reported.

Beyond overdoses, there are other unique concerns related to prescription opioid use in older populations.

“Even if they’re not addicted, opioids can cause problems with breathing, with confusion and with falls in older adults,” Steiner said. “There’s also a risk that somebody else in the family could be diverting their medications.”

Topics to be addressed at the seminar include warning signs that older adults may be suffering from opioid addiction; examples of situations that increase the risk for abuse or addiction; evidence-based pain management in the era of the opioid crisis; and public policy and resources for health-care professionals who work with older adults and their families.

“Older adults are interfacing with so many different health-care professionals and our hope with this Oct. 5 presentation is to bring in all these providers so they receive the same prevention education messages and recognize the importance of assessing opioid use and misuse,” said Dr. Nancy Orel, executive director of research at BGSU’s Optimal Aging Institute and interim chair of the Department of Human Services.

To register for the free, public event, call the Wood County Committee on Aging at 419.353.5661 or email oai@bgsu.edu. The event does not offer continuing medical education credits.

Satellites to hold $6 sale Sept. 26-28

The Satellites Auxiliary’s $6 sale will take place Wednesday through Friday, Sept. 26-28, in UT Medical Center’s Four Seasons Bistro Atrium.

“We’ll have items for women, men and children, with great deals on fashion and seasonal accessories, as well as jewelry, gadgets and more,” said Lynn Brand, president of the Satellites Auxiliary.

The sale will run from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday, from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday, and from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday.

Cash, credit cards and payroll deduction will be accepted.

A portion of the proceeds will benefit scholarships.

The Satellites Auxiliary is a volunteer group designed to promote education, research and service programs; provide support of patient programs in accordance with the needs and approval of administration; conduct fundraising events; and provide services.

For more information on the sale, contact Brand at lynn.brand@utoledo.edu.

Join Komen team for Sept. 30 Race for the Cure

One in eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in her lifetime, and many of those diagnosed won’t have the same access to health-care resources and support.

That’s why The University of Toledo is joining the fight and participating in the 25th annual Komen Northwest Ohio Toledo Race for the Cure Sunday, Sept. 30.

The team, Rocket to a Cure, will be led by Tonya Hoyt, a cardio electrophysiology nurse in the UT Medical Center Heart and Vascular Center. Hoyt was diagnosed with metastatic invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast in August 2017.

“This year has been a rough one getting through chemotherapy, surgery and radiation, along with getting Herceptin and Perjeta every three weeks,” Hoyt said.

The Race for the Cure cause is close to Hoyt.

“I have been a supporter of this event for years, long before I was diagnosed,” she said. “I want to make an impact in the fight against breast cancer and need the help of colleagues and friends.”

Hoyt is inviting members of the UT community to join her at this year’s Race for the Cure. Faculty, physicians, staff and students are welcome to join her by registering for Rocket to a Cure here.

Registration is $30 per adult team member and $25 for survivors.

The event, which will take place between 9:30 and 11 a.m., includes a 5K run, 5K walk and a one-mile family fun walk.

Registration will begin at 7:30 a.m. in downtown Toledo at 406 Washington St.

Participants will receive a T-shirt in addition to making a difference in breast cancer care, support and research.

“Your support helps us get one step closer to a world without breast cancer,” Hoyt said.

UTMC nurse graduates from FEMA’s first National Emergency Management Basic Academy in Ohio

UT Medical Center Nurse Erin Konecki recently graduated from the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s National Emergency Management Basic Academy in Columbus, Ohio.

It was the first such program to be held in the state.

Erin Konecki posed for a photo with Daniel Kolcum, assistant director of the Ohio Emergency Management Agency, after graduating from National Emergency Management Basic Academy in June.

FEMA is an agency of the United States Department of Homeland Security; its mission is to support citizens and first responders to ensure that the nation works together to build, sustain and improve the capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

The National Emergency Basic Academy was created to produce a comprehensive curriculum that provides the foundational knowledge and skills needed to support the unpredictable challenges in the field of emergency management.

It can be considered a gateway for those pursuing a career in emergency management and provides participants with the opportunity to build camaraderie and establish contacts for those new or transferring to the emergency management profession.

It is the first phase of FEMA’s new Emergency Management Professional Program, which is designed to be a lifetime of learning for emergency managers. The program includes three separate but closely related training programs — the Basic Academy, the National Emergency Management Leaders Academy and the Executive Academy.

“I have had a lot of experience taking classes through FEMA training, including online self-paced courses, traveling to Anniston, Alabama, to the Center for Domestic Preparedness, taking local FEMA courses, and hosting FEMA classes right here at UT,” Konecki said. “I began seeking other opportunities through the state and when I was made aware there was a basic emergency management course, I jumped at the opportunity.”

Konecki finished the five required courses — Foundations in Emergency Management; Science of Disaster; Planning: Emergency Operations; Exercise Design; and Public Information and Warning. She also completed a total of 152 hours of training to graduate from the National Emergency Basic Academy.

“Emergency management is a very complex discipline,” Konecki said. “Enrolling in the academy was extremely beneficial to me to gain a greater understanding of the foundation and background of emergency management.”

She is a registered and alternate lead nurse in UTMC’s Emergency Department. She also serves as the department’s clinical disaster liaison, working with the staff of the Safety and Health departments and the clinical staff members of the Emergency Department. She assists with disaster drill planning and other necessary tasks to ensure involvement of the nurses.

Konecki received her bachelor’s degree in nursing from Lourdes University and basic EMT certification and national registry card through Owens Community College.

She is also a 2018 graduate of the Master of Public Health Program at UT, where she majored in environmental and occupational health and safety science with a focus in disaster preparedness.

Konecki said the academy taught her how to effectively plan drills while working with the Ohio Emergency Management Agency planners; improved her networking and public speaking skills; taught her how to anticipate and respond to disasters, and how to disseminate information to the public.

“It was a very proud moment to have graduated from this program,” she said. “It was especially monumental to be the first group ever from Ohio.”

Konecki plans to attend higher levels of the Emergency Management Professional Program as her career progresses.

For more information about FEMA’s training and emergency management courses, visit training.fema.gov/empp.

UT to mark International Overdose Awareness Day this week

The University of Toledo is joining others around the globe to raise awareness, reduce the stigma of drug-related deaths, and remember those who have died or suffered permanent injury because of drug overdose, and stimulate discussion about overdose prevention and drug policy.

“No community is immune to overdose; it is time to change the way we look at drug-related deaths. Opioid abuse, addiction and overdoses affect families of every socio-demographic group,” said Dr. Amy Thompson, interim associate vice provost for faculty affairs and co-chair of the UT Opioid Task Force. “Our research, education and service activities can help make a difference in the state of Ohio, as well as the nation.”

In 2014, nearly 80 percent of drug overdose fatalities in Ohio were caused by opioids.

In 2003, there were 296 opioid overdoses in Ohio. In 2014, that number rose to 2,202 deaths. On average, three people die each week from overdoses in Lucas County.

“Have the conversation with your friends and family and spread the message that overdose is a problem affecting every community, including Toledo,” said Thompson, professor of public health and director of the Center for Health and Successful Living. “We need to educate individuals on treatment and recovery services. Realizing that addressing substance abuse and addiction is difficult, the recovery process is a journey that needs great strength and commitment.”

“In order to help solve this problem, we all have to work together,” said Dr. Linda Lewandowski, dean of the College of Nursing and co-chair of the UT Opioid Task Force. “In addition to treatment services, prevention efforts are key. We need widespread education about safe, appropriate pain management, safe prescribing practices, and safe storage of pain medications at home.”

For International Overdose Day Aug. 31, members of UT Rocket Wellness, UT Outpatient Pharmacy, UT Medical Center and the UT Opioid Task Force will pass International Overdose Awareness Day ribbons across campus to invite the University community to show its support and use the hashtags #OverdoseAware and #EndOverdose on social media to boost awareness. Ribbon distribution will begin Wednesday, Aug. 29, and continue through Friday.

In November 2017, UT President Sharon L. Gaber created a task force to address the opioid epidemic. The committee’s goals include identifying and coordinating current research, education and community service that UT faculty and students are engaged in; meeting with community and government leaders to strengthen partnerships; and identifying possible funding sources to support future collaborative projects. Read more here.

To find out more about International Overdose Awareness Day, visit overdoseday.com.