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Disability studies assistant professor awarded fellowship for research on incarceration

Dr. Liat Ben-Moshe, assistant professor of disability studies, wants to bridge the gap between studying disability and incarceration.

“It was odd to me that there weren’t more connections between disability studies and prison studies when I first began doing this work. Now, after doing this for more than a decade, there are more people, organizations and scholarship on this topic,” she said. “First, there is the high proportion of disabled — psychiatric, cognitive, learning or other disabilities — in prison, a phenomenon not often discussed. Then there are so many sites of confinement for people with disabilities, even outside of prison settings — nursing homes, psych hospitals, institutions. We need to understand all these as sites of incarceration.”

Ben-Moshe

Ben-Moshe recently was recognized for her outstanding work with one of the American Association of University Women’s American Fellowships for the 2017-18 academic year. These fellowships support women scholars who are completing dissertations, planning research leave, or preparing research for publication.

Her forthcoming book, “Politics of (En)Closure,” focuses on movements to abolish prisons and deinstitutionalization of mental and intellectual health institutions.

“I am incredibly honored to be receiving such a prestigious and competitive fellowship, and I see it as a recognition for my work on social movements that resist incarceration. But I also see it as a recognition of the field of disability studies and specifically of UT’s role as a leader in the field of disability studies, as we have currently the only on campus bachelor of arts degree in disability studies in the U.S.,” Ben-Moshe said.

Studies have shown that more than half of inmates in local and state prisons received clinical diagnosis or treatment by a mental health professional. Ben-Moshe believes the solution to this troubling statistic lies in having a better understanding of what is called mental illness.

“When people who do prison advocacy or critical prison studies work discuss disability, it is not as an identity and a culture, but as a deficit. Those within disability advocacy and work really need to learn more about prison and prison abolition,” she explained. “The intersectional nature of oppression and its resistance here are vital.

“For example, in my new book, I discuss what prison reformers and abolitionists can learn from deinstitutionalization, which was another mass movement to close carceral settings such as psychiatric hospitals, institutions for people with intellectual disabilities. People didn’t think it will happen; it was called utopia, unrealistic. But it did happen, and we can learn from it about how to rely less on settings that segregate people, like institutions and prisons, and more about how to deal with harm and difference in the community.”

UT psychologist challenges accuracy of method to interview child witnesses

The reliability of child witness testimony is a prime factor in cases of abuse, but how they are questioned can influence a child’s answers. When faced with choices, a child will often pick one, even if the correct answer is not one of the options given.

New research by a University of Toledo psychologist supports asking open-ended questions and challenges an increasingly popular solution for forensic interviewers to add a “something else” alternative choice when questioning young children.

London Newton

“What we found in our research is that even when children may correctly choose the something else option when the other choices are not accurate, the follow-up answer also is inaccurate,” said Dr. Kamala London Newton, UT associate professor of psychology.

For example, a child is asked a question such as whether the interviewer said that her favorite fruit was an apple, a banana or something else. The interviewer never said anything about her favorite fruit, so the child does not know the correct answer. So the child responds with something else, but when prompted with “What is her favorite fruit?” the child replied, “Carrots.”

London Newton’s research titled “Does It Help, Hurt or Something Else? The Effect of a Something Else Response Alternative on Children’s Performance on Forced-Choice Questions,” is published in the August issue of the American Psychological Association journal Psychology, Public Policy and the Law. She co-authored the article with graduate students Ashley Hall and Nicole Lytle, who have since received their PhDs in developmental psychology from UT.

London Newton’s Developmental Psychology Lab studies the best practices in interviewing child witnesses, and she has provided expert testimony on the subject, with her work cited twice by the United States Supreme Court.

“Interviewing young children, particularly those preschool-aged, can be a challenge because of their limited communication skills and the fact that they do not resist answering false and unanswerable questions,” London Newton said.

“While providing children choices increases the probability that the child will answer the questions, those answers are too often inaccurate,” she said. “That is especially true if children are asked a question but none of the answer choices provided are accurate because children generally do not reply that they do not know.”

That presents a challenge because child abuse professionals argue that answers to open-ended prompts are too sparse and so forced-choice questions are needed, but it is not possible for those professionals to always be sure that one of the choices they are giving the child is true, London Newton said.

For her latest study, London Newton and her research team interviewed 94 children ages 3 to 5 years old. The children had participated in a 20-minute event in which a research assistant touched children on different public locations of their body, such as the elbow, and asked them to show on a doll or drawing where they were touched. Then after a one-week delay, the children were interviewed about that event with a series of questions in which half the participants were asked standard questions with two choices and the others were asked questions with those two choices and also given the something else option.

The researchers found that the addition of the something else option did not improve the accuracy of responses. This was the case for all three types of questions asked — true questions in which the correct answer was present, false questions in which no correct answer was provided, and unanswerable questions that require speculation, for example, is red heavier than yellow?

“Our research supports additional work in this field that shows that the most developmentally appropriate way to pose questions to young children is to avoid forced-choice options as much as possible,” London Newton said. “One of the biggest dangers of including a something else alternative is that it may incorrectly give the interviewers more confidence that the response is accurate. Our findings support that asking open-ended questions is the best approach to interviewing young children.”

Celebrating 25 years at Art on the Mall

For two local painters, it may have been a stroke of luck when Art on the Mall debuted in 1992 at their alma mater.

“I had been doing a lot of paintings of Lake Erie scenes, and then this event was announced,” Carol Connolly Pletz recalled.

This watercolor painting of University Hall by Kathy Palmer Genzman was featured in one of her Toledo calendars. “I always include my alma mater in the calendar,” she said.

“It was the year I made my first Toledo calendar,” Kathy Palmer Genzman said. “It was like it was meant to be.”

The two women were among 51 artists who displayed and sold their work at the inaugural juried fair.

“It was a beautiful sunny day. There were few tents, if any, and UT supplied wire structures to display paintings,” Connolly Pletz, a 1966 alumna with a bachelor’s degree in art, said. “It was the first show where I stood out with a few my paintings. It was a very positive experience; people loved my work.”

Palmer Genzman also felt the love.

“It was my husband, Bob, who suggested the calendar. He wrote the history, and I drew and painted scenes from around town,” she said. “When Art on the Mall was announced, he said, ‘Let’s see if they sell,’ and they did — people loved the calendar.”

“Brown Swiss Dairy,” acrylic, was painted by Carol Connolly Pletz after one of her many visits to Shipshewana, Ind.

Connolly Pletz and Palmer Genzman have returned to Art on the Mall every year. The perennial favorites will be back with more than 100 artists Sunday, July 30, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Centennial Mall.

“I am so grateful to UT for putting this event on every year,” Connolly Pletz said. “The community really enjoys the art, music and food. It’s great it has remained a free show with free parking. Toledo loves this show.”

“Everyone at UT is always so helpful,” Palmer Genzman, a 1980 graduate with a master’s degree in art education, said. “I’ve known Dan [Saevig, associate vice president of alumni relations] since the beginning. He and his crew do an amazing job rain or shine.”

Even fellow artists offer assistance. Connolly Pletz learned about notecards from Tom Durnford, a UT alumnus who taught a graphics class for the Communication Department and was director of publications and graphics from 1965 until his retirement from the University in 1989. The two had booths next to each for 23 years until Durnford passed away.

Carol Connolly Pletz has made 160 cards from her acrylic paintings.

“He worked in watercolor and besides his paintings, he sold notecards of his artwork,” Connolly Pletz said. “That first year at Art on the Mall, I saw he was doing a brisk business selling his cards. We talked, and he agreed to mentor me in publishing my own notecards.”

Since then, she has made 160 cards from her eye-catchingly colorful acrylic paintings, which showcase scenes from the Metroparks of the Toledo Area; the Lake Erie islands; Shipshewana, Ind.; and Ireland.

“People like to take something away that’s affordable,” Connolly Pletz said. “Not everybody has a place for a painting or can afford an original or the color is wrong. But everybody can use cards.”

“I also sell Toledo notecards, which are very popular,” Palmer Genzman said. “I sell out of calendars every year; I always have to send the kids home to get more. The calendars aren’t that expensive, and yet they’re artwork. People really enjoy having a picture of Toledo.”

That local focus is important to both artists.

Palmer Genzman’s 2018 calendar features her meticulously detailed watercolor paintings of the University, last year’s Jeep parade, the Lights Before Christmas at the Toledo Zoo, walleye fishing, the Niagara ship on the Maumee River and more. Since her husband passed away, her son, Paul, writes the history.

Kathy Palmer Genzman posed for a photo in front of some of her watercolor paintings that are included in her Toledo calendar.

“I want people to love their city and be proud of it. It’s a great city; it’s a great University — look at that campus. What more can you ask for? Good eating places, you’ve got the Mud Hens downtown, I love the renaissance of downtown,” she said. “I taught art at Toledo Public Schools and lived in the Glass City until retirement. I now live in Lambertville, Mich., but I’m a Toledo person.”

“Many local places have caught my eye — and my heart,” Connolly Pletz said. “The Toledo Botanical Garden, Wildwood Metropark Preserve, the Maumee River, to name a few. There is so much natural beauty in our part of the world. I hope my work inspires some to pause and take a closer look at what we have right here.”

Glacity Theatre Collective to present world premiere of ‘Falling Short’

It’s Feb. 1, 2003. Space Shuttle Columbia has just disintegrated upon re-entry. What kind of person would see this horrible disaster as an opportunity?

Meet Ed and Tony. On a quest for Shuttle parts — as souvenirs or possibly to sell on eBay — the two men journey through the Piney Woods of east Texas, arguing conspiracy theories, ridiculing Nazis, dissing English literature, confessing peculiar secrets, and contemplating their own failed existence.

Texas playwright Wolfgang Paetzel vividly remembers that day: “The Columbia disaster happened right over my house. I should have noticed the loud booms and rattling of windows, but I was too preoccupied chasing a screaming toddler. At that moment, in my own little universe, a poopy diaper was more pressing. ‘Falling Short’ features many folks in similar situations — but only one poopy diaper.”

In this multimedia piece, Ed and Tony will be played live by Drew Wheeler and Dr. Edmund B. Lingan, UT associate professor and chair of theatre and film, as they interact with video segments incorporating actors from both Texas and Ohio.

“East Texas has a distinct natural environment that is different from the rest of Texas,” said Lingan, who, like Paetzel, grew up in that area. “Wolfgang has done an amazing job of capturing the look and the language of the region, and he has really caught the essence of the people we grew up with.”

The production is directed by Lingan, with video segments created by Paetzel and UT alumna Megan Aherne, and set and lighting design by James S. Hill, UT professor emeritus of theatre.

The soundtrack showcases music from obscure Texas garage bands as well as Lone Star legends, including The Blanks, Texas Belairs, Ran, Homer Henderson, Sled, Culturcide, Roy Bennett, and The Peenbeets.

“Falling Short” will run Thursday through Saturday, July 20-22, in the UT Center for Performing Arts Center Theatre. All performances will be at 8 p.m. The doors will open one half hour prior to curtain.

Tickets are $15 at the door or in advance online here. Student tickets are $10 with a valid ID and are available only at the door.

For more information, go to glacity.org.

2017 report for Ohio’s Harmful Algal Bloom Research Initiative highlights UT water quality research

Ohio Sea Grant released today its 2017 update on the statewide Harmful Algal Bloom Research Initiative documenting two years of progress seeking solutions for harmful algal blooms in Lake Erie.

The University of Toledo, situated on the western basin of Lake Erie, is one of the lead universities in the initiative, which consists of 10 Ohio universities and five state agencies and is funded by the Ohio Department of Higher Education and matching funds from participating universities.

The city of Toledo’s water intake is regularly monitored by UT researchers and students during the summer algal bloom season to check for toxins.

The 54-page report features a variety of important research activity underway by members of the UT Water Task Force to protect the public water supply and public health, including:

• Early warning system for toxic algae in Lake Erie’s Maumee Bay by Dr. Tom Bridgeman, professor in the UT Department of Environmental Sciences, and Dr. Ricky Becker, associate professor in the UT Department of Environmental Sciences;

• Developing methods to help water treatment plant operators make decisions on lake water pumping rates according to time of day and weather conditions in order to reduce exposure to algal toxins at the Lake Erie water intake, also by Bridgeman and Becker;

• Transport and fate of cyanotoxins in drinking water distribution systems, such as pipes and storage tanks, by Dr. Youngwoo Seo, associate professor in the UT Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering;

• Investigating alternative biological filtration for algal toxin removal in water treatment through better understanding of microcystin-degrading bacteria, also by Seo;

• Examining the influence of potassium permanganate treatment on algal cell integrity and toxin degradation, also by Seo;

• Developing microcystin-detoxifying water biofilters to upgrade water treatment filters with friendly bacteria through the discovery of enzymes and pathways responsible for microcystin degradation by Dr. Jason Huntley, associate professor in the UT Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology;

• Studying the accuracy of ELISA, the standard test measuring harmful algal toxins, in comparison to a more time-consuming but reliable method, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry by Dr. Dragan Isailovic, associate professor in the UT Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry;

• Developing lab tests for detecting microcystin exposure through biological samples and measuring how much remains inside the body, also by Isailovic;

• Evaluating the ability of commercially available home purification systems to remove algal toxins from tap water by Dr. Glenn Lipscomb, professor and chair of the UT Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering;

• Reconsidering recommended healthy exposure limits by studying the impact of algal toxins in experimental models of pre-existing liver disease by Dr. David Kennedy and Dr. Steven Haller, assistant professors in the UT Division of Cardiovascular Medicine;

• Studying health effects of recreational and work exposure to harmful algal blooms through fishing, swimming or boating by Dr. April Ames and Dr. Michael Valigosky, assistant professors in the UT Department of Occupational and Public Health; and

• Creating an online database to help inform the public about harmful algal blooms in Lake Erie by Dr. Patrick Lawrence, UT geography professor and associate dean of the College of Arts and Letters.

Ohio Sea Grant, which manages the statewide Harmful Algal Bloom Research Initiative, is soliciting proposals for a third round of funding to continue the efforts underway to address toxic algae in Ohio’s Great Lake.

Participating universities include UT, Ohio State University, Bowling Green State University, Central State University, Defiance College, Heidelberg University, Kent State University, Sinclair Community College, the University of Akron and the University of Cincinnati. UT and OSU serve as leaders of the university consortium.

To view the full report, go to http://ohioseagrant.osu.edu/p/ib57m/view.

For Ohio Sea Grant’s news release, go to http://ohioseagrant.osu.edu/news/2017/gz884/habri-report-year-2.

The UT Water Task Force, which is comprised of faculty and researchers in diverse fields spanning the University, serves as a resource for government officials and the public looking for expertise on investigating the causes and effects of algal blooms, the health of Lake Erie, and the health of the communities depending on its water. The task force includes experts in economics; engineering; environmental sciences; business; pharmacy; law; chemistry and biochemistry; geography and planning; and medical microbiology and immunology.

Water quality is a major research focus at UT. With $12.5 million in active grants underway, UT experts are studying algal blooms, invasive species such as Asian carp, and pollutants. Researchers are looking for pathways to restore our greatest natural resource for future generations to ensure communities continue to have access to safe drinking water.

Researchers and students help to protect the public drinking water supply for the greater Toledo area throughout summer algal bloom season by conducting water sampling to alert water treatment plant operators of any toxins heading toward the water intake. UT’s 28-foot research vessel and early warning buoy enable UT to partner with the city of Toledo and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to monitor the health of Lake Erie and provide real-time data.

Walk this way: Discover downtown tours scheduled this summer

Grab comfortable shoes and step it up at lunch: Check out the new places featured in this summer’s 33rd annual Discover Downtown Toledo Walking Tours.

The free, public tours will be held rain or shine every Thursday from July 6 through Aug. 24 from noon to 1 p.m.

One of this summer’s new Discover Downtown Toledo Walking Tours is the Middlegrounds Metropark. Be there Thursday, July 27, to learn about the 28-acre urban green space that features a 1.5-mile path along the Maumee River.

Sponsored by the The University of Toledo Jack Ford Urban Affairs Center and the Toledo-Lucas County Public Library, the tours will be:

• July 6 — Fifth Third Building. See the view from Toledo’s tallest skyscraper. Meet in the lobby of One Seagate on Summit Street. Photo ID required for access to upper floors.

• July 13 — The Oliver House, 27 Broadway St. Built in 1859, this is the Glass City’s oldest commercial structure in continual use. Learn how the building has been adapted over the years. Meet in the parking lot.

• July 20 — Adams Street and Uptown. Walk along Adams Street from 10th Street to 18th Street. Meet on the Toledo-Lucas County Public Library’s north lawn at Adams and Michigan streets.

• July 27 — Middlegrounds Metropark. See spectacular views of the city from Toledo’s newest park. Meet in the main parking lot, 111 Ottawa St.

• Aug. 3 — Westmoreland Historic Neighborhood. Experience one of Toledo’s most elegant early 20th-century neighborhoods; it is a local and national historic district. Meet on the center island at Mt Vernon and Grand avenues.

• Aug. 10 — Collingwood Arts Center. One of the earliest homes of the Old West End grew into a religious complex and then into one of the city’s premier arts centers. Meet at 2413 Blvd. Parking available at center.

• Aug. 17 — Royal Hotel. The new owners will discuss their restoration plans for the building. Meet in front of 337 Broadway St.

Check out the homes in Westmoreland, which was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1986. Even if it’s not a beautiful Thursday, Aug. 3, bring an umbrella for the free walking tour.

• Aug. 24 — Old Orchard Neighborhood. Discover how this area got its name, and learn about its streets, architecture and early residents. Meet at Kenwood Boulevard and Pemberton Drive; park near Kenwood.

“We wanted to expand our offerings and explore other popular areas of Toledo this summer,” said Dr. Neil Reid, UT professor of geography and director of the Jack Ford Urban Affairs Center. “The Middlegrounds Metropark, Royal Hotel, Collingwood Arts Center, and the Old Orchard and Westmoreland neighborhoods are new tours.”

He added the tours are led by guides who are passionate about the city and trained in Toledo history and architecture.

Participants will receive a copy of the award-winning “Discover Downtown Toledo Walking Tour Guidebook.”

For more information, call the Toledo-Lucas County Public Library Local History and Genealogy Department at 419.259.5233.

Fellows selected for new conference leadership initiative

Three UT faculty members have been named fellows to participate in the new Mid-American Conference Academic Leadership Development Program.

The program was created to foster preparation and advancement of future academic leaders through working with MAC administrators and colleagues.

Dr. Andrew Hsu, provost and executive vice president for academic affairs, said, “The University of Toledo is excited to join the Mid-American Conference Academic Leadership Development Program, and we are happy to announce the fellows from our institution who will benefit from this tremendous opportunity.”

Fellows for the 2017-18 academic year are:

• Dr. Patrick Lawrence, professor of geography and planning, and associate dean of social and behavioral sciences in the College of Arts and Letters;

• Holly Monsos, professor of theatre and associate dean of the School of Visual and Performing Arts in the College of Arts and Letters; and

• Dr. Amy Thompson, professor of public health in the School of Population Health in the College of Health and Human Services; faculty fellow in the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs; and 2017-18 president of Faculty Senate.

All tenured faculty with experience in administrative leadership and service were eligible to apply for the MAC Academic Leadership Development Program. Candidates needed to submit a letter of support from their dean, as well as an application and curriculum vitae for consideration.

“Our fellows will participate in a development program with UT leaders to gain valuable insight and experience,” Hsu said. “In addition, they will work with MAC school administrators and peers to better understand how universities operate.”

All MAC Academic Leadership Development Program fellows will attend one three-day workshop each semester. Topics to be addressed include conflict resolution, budgeting, accreditation and accountability.

“Thanks to this program, our fellows will see firsthand the challenges and rewards of institutional service as they prepare for potential leadership positions,” Hsu said.

Read more about the MAC Academic Leadership Development Program at utoledo.edu/offices/provost/MAC-ALDP.html.

Golf outing to raise funds for geography scholarship to honor late UT grad student

If Michael Moore wasn’t working on his dissertation or sampling craft beer, he was on the golf course.

“Mike enjoyed playing golf,” said Dr. Neil Reid, professor of geography and planning, and director of the Jack Ford Urban Affairs Center. “He also enjoyed debating varieties of hops and India pale ales as much and as easily as he dove into complex statistical analyses of the industry.”

Moore

Moore died from an aortic aneurysm April 8, 2015, while having a beer at a local pub. The doctoral student in the UT Department of Geography and Planning was 34.

To honor his memory, the Geography and Planning Department has established the Michael Moore Memorial Student Scholarship Fund.

“This fund will allow us to award scholarships to academically qualified students pursuing a bachelor of arts degree in geography who demonstrate financial need,” said Dr. Dan Hammel, professor and chair of geography and planning. “It also allows us to remember a fine student who became a respected colleague.”

For his dissertation, Moore was studying the spatial dynamics of the American craft beer industry. He posthumously received his PhD from the University.

“The craft brewing industry is growing so fast and changing the whole brewing landscape,” Reid said. “Mike analyzed where it’s growing and why. He was well on his way to being a really successful academic.”

A native of Swanton, Ohio, Moore received a certificate in geographic information sciences and applied geographics from UT in 2012.

To raise funds, the Michael Moore Memorial Scholarship Golf Outing will be held Saturday, June 17, from 1 to 9 p.m. at White Pines Golf Course, 1640 County Road 2, Swanton.

The cost is $75 for an individual golfer or $300 for a foursome and covers 18 holes, golf cart and dinner. There also are hole signage sponsorship opportunities available for $125. A dinner-only option costs $50.

To register, go to give2ut.utoledo.edu/mooregolf.asp.

To donate to the Michael Moore Memorial Student Scholarship Fund, go to give2ut.utoledo.edu/mikemoore.asp.

For more information about the event or fund, contact Heather Slough, director of annual giving in the Division of Advancement, at heather.slough@utoledo.edu or 419.530.8495.

UT offers summer music workshops

The University of Toledo Department of Music will host several summer music workshops.

Workshops are available in jazz, flute, voice, and choral conducting and teaching, with tracks available for multiple ages and skill levels.

All the workshops listed below will be held in the Center for Performing Arts.

UT Summer Jazz Institute — June 11-16
Deadline to Register: June 1

The UT Summer Jazz Institute is the place where all levels of jazz students from beginning through professional can discover and achieve their jazz potential through the study of jazz in one of four programs: instrumental jazz, vocal jazz, teacher training and jazz appreciation. The curriculum is designed to provide introductory, fundamental, intermediate and advanced jazz experiences for interested students from middle school through high school, undergraduate and graduate college students. There also is a pedagogy track for educators desiring to refine and develop their teaching skills. A track for those who want to grow in their appreciation of jazz also is available.

The institute provides a learning environment through lectures, master classes, jam sessions, performances and a recording experience. Participants immerse themselves in improvisation, performance, arranging, and pedagogy with established professional jazz musician/educators. Tuition is $500 ($50 application fee, $450 camp fee). Register online at summerjazz.utoledo.edu. Deadline to register is June 1; all fees due by June 9.

Flute Camp — June 19-23
Deadline to Register: June 12

The UT Flute Camp is taught by musicians Joel Tse, principal flute for the Toledo Symphony Orchestra and UT flute instructor, and Amy Heritage, second flute with the Toledo Symphony Orchestra and Suzuki flute instructor. It is suitable for elementary age students through adults.
Special guests will present on instrument care, yoga and breathing, music and movement, and more. These extras are included in the track fees. A free, public concert performed by students will conclude the workshop on Friday, June 23, at 4 p.m.

There are two tracks to choose from:

Track 1 is for students who have been playing for one to three years. It runs from 9 a.m. to noon and is taught by Heritage. The cost for Track 1 is $150. Fees are due by the first day of the workshop.

Track 2 is for intermediate and advanced students and will run from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. This track is taught by Tse and Heritage. Track 2 is $300. Fees are due by the first day of the workshop.

Can’t attend all week? Sign up by the day. The cost is $65 per day for any track if attending less than the full week. Scholarships also are available to help cover fees; apply when you register.

To register or for more information, visit utoledo.edu/al/svpa/music/communitymusic/flutecamp.html.

Janus Vocal Arts Workshops — July 5-14
Deadline to Register: June 7

The Janus Vocal Arts Workshops offer professional development seminars and workshops in voice. In addition to the Emerging Artist track that studies and performs an opera, there is a High School Student track (July 10-14) which focuses on vocal technique and musical theatre. The two seminars — “Mind, Body, Voice” (July 7-8) and “Music as a Business” (July 12-13) — can be taken separately or together at a discount.

Registration, cost and discount information available online at utoledo.edu/al/svpa/music/communitymusic/janusvocalarts

Choral Conducting and Teaching Workshop — July 25-27
Deadline to Register July 1

This comprehensive and immersive choral conducting workshop is intended to serve and educate individuals as conductor, teacher, leader, scholar, performer and servant. Conductors will engage in sessions covering a wide variety of topics. This year’s workshop will allow conductors to choose from either a three-day immersion workshop or a one-day workshop. Teachers: This workshop will provide up to 18 contact hours of professional development.

There will be a limit of 15 spaces so that each conductor is allowed sufficient podium/conducting time. Coffee and a light breakfast will be provided in the morning. The three-day workshop is $300 if registered by July 1; $325 if registered after July 1. The one-day workshop is $100 if registered by July 1; $125 if registered after July 1. All sessions will be from from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., with a break for lunch (not provided).

Registration and information available are online at
utoledo.edu/al/svpa/music/communitymusic/summerchoral/choralworkshops.html.

Department of Art to present two workshops June 5-9

The UT Department of Art will offer two summer workshops for students ages 9 through high school. From Monday through Friday, June 5-9, Manga/Anime will be held in the morning, and Wizard School will take place in the afternoon. 

In the morning workshop, students will explore manga and anime design techniques across a range of media — hand-painted shoes, digital design, hats and more. Participants should bring a pair of new, white canvas tennis shoes; all other materials are provided.

Students in the Manga/Anime workshop will create hand-painted tennis shoes.

When students graduate from Wizard School, they’ll be equipped to unleash their creative inner wizard. Participants will make a wand; design a wizardry crest; concoct potion bottles; build a dark forest terrarium; create a plush creature; and develop and play wizard games. All materials will be provided.

Alissa Cox, an independent artist since 2006, will present the workshops.

Coming from a family of artisans and artists, Cox grew up learning woodcrafts, stained glass, blacksmithing, jewelry craft, quilting and painting. She moved her business, Smoky Grove, to Ohio in 2012 and has exhibited at Columbus Winterfair, the Great Lakes Jazz Festival and the Black Swamp Arts Festival. Cox has taught several workshops in pyrography, sewing and painting.

The cost is $60 per workshop or $105 to take both workshops.

Both workshops will be held in the Center for the Visual Arts on the University’s Toledo Museum of Art Campus.

To register, go to utoledo.edu/al/svpa/art/webforms/summerartworkshopsregform.html