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Fellows selected for new conference leadership initiative

Three UT faculty members have been named fellows to participate in the new Mid-American Conference Academic Leadership Development Program.

The program was created to foster preparation and advancement of future academic leaders through working with MAC administrators and colleagues.

Dr. Andrew Hsu, provost and executive vice president for academic affairs, said, “The University of Toledo is excited to join the Mid-American Conference Academic Leadership Development Program, and we are happy to announce the fellows from our institution who will benefit from this tremendous opportunity.”

Fellows for the 2017-18 academic year are:

• Dr. Patrick Lawrence, professor of geography and planning, and associate dean of social and behavioral sciences in the College of Arts and Letters;

• Holly Monsos, professor of theatre and associate dean of the School of Visual and Performing Arts in the College of Arts and Letters; and

• Dr. Amy Thompson, professor of public health in the School of Population Health in the College of Health and Human Services; faculty fellow in the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs; and 2017-18 president of Faculty Senate.

All tenured faculty with experience in administrative leadership and service were eligible to apply for the MAC Academic Leadership Development Program. Candidates needed to submit a letter of support from their dean, as well as an application and curriculum vitae for consideration.

“Our fellows will participate in a development program with UT leaders to gain valuable insight and experience,” Hsu said. “In addition, they will work with MAC school administrators and peers to better understand how universities operate.”

All MAC Academic Leadership Development Program fellows will attend one three-day workshop each semester. Topics to be addressed include conflict resolution, budgeting, accreditation and accountability.

“Thanks to this program, our fellows will see firsthand the challenges and rewards of institutional service as they prepare for potential leadership positions,” Hsu said.

Read more about the MAC Academic Leadership Development Program at utoledo.edu/offices/provost/MAC-ALDP.html.

Golf outing to raise funds for geography scholarship to honor late UT grad student

If Michael Moore wasn’t working on his dissertation or sampling craft beer, he was on the golf course.

“Mike enjoyed playing golf,” said Dr. Neil Reid, professor of geography and planning, and director of the Jack Ford Urban Affairs Center. “He also enjoyed debating varieties of hops and India pale ales as much and as easily as he dove into complex statistical analyses of the industry.”

Moore

Moore died from an aortic aneurysm April 8, 2015, while having a beer at a local pub. The doctoral student in the UT Department of Geography and Planning was 34.

To honor his memory, the Geography and Planning Department has established the Michael Moore Memorial Student Scholarship Fund.

“This fund will allow us to award scholarships to academically qualified students pursuing a bachelor of arts degree in geography who demonstrate financial need,” said Dr. Dan Hammel, professor and chair of geography and planning. “It also allows us to remember a fine student who became a respected colleague.”

For his dissertation, Moore was studying the spatial dynamics of the American craft beer industry. He posthumously received his PhD from the University.

“The craft brewing industry is growing so fast and changing the whole brewing landscape,” Reid said. “Mike analyzed where it’s growing and why. He was well on his way to being a really successful academic.”

A native of Swanton, Ohio, Moore received a certificate in geographic information sciences and applied geographics from UT in 2012.

To raise funds, the Michael Moore Memorial Scholarship Golf Outing will be held Saturday, June 17, from 1 to 9 p.m. at White Pines Golf Course, 1640 County Road 2, Swanton.

The cost is $75 for an individual golfer or $300 for a foursome and covers 18 holes, golf cart and dinner. There also are hole signage sponsorship opportunities available for $125. A dinner-only option costs $50.

To register, go to give2ut.utoledo.edu/mooregolf.asp.

To donate to the Michael Moore Memorial Student Scholarship Fund, go to give2ut.utoledo.edu/mikemoore.asp.

For more information about the event or fund, contact Heather Slough, director of annual giving in the Division of Advancement, at heather.slough@utoledo.edu or 419.530.8495.

UT offers summer music workshops

The University of Toledo Department of Music will host several summer music workshops.

Workshops are available in jazz, flute, voice, and choral conducting and teaching, with tracks available for multiple ages and skill levels.

All the workshops listed below will be held in the Center for Performing Arts.

UT Summer Jazz Institute — June 11-16
Deadline to Register: June 1

The UT Summer Jazz Institute is the place where all levels of jazz students from beginning through professional can discover and achieve their jazz potential through the study of jazz in one of four programs: instrumental jazz, vocal jazz, teacher training and jazz appreciation. The curriculum is designed to provide introductory, fundamental, intermediate and advanced jazz experiences for interested students from middle school through high school, undergraduate and graduate college students. There also is a pedagogy track for educators desiring to refine and develop their teaching skills. A track for those who want to grow in their appreciation of jazz also is available.

The institute provides a learning environment through lectures, master classes, jam sessions, performances and a recording experience. Participants immerse themselves in improvisation, performance, arranging, and pedagogy with established professional jazz musician/educators. Tuition is $500 ($50 application fee, $450 camp fee). Register online at summerjazz.utoledo.edu. Deadline to register is June 1; all fees due by June 9.

Flute Camp — June 19-23
Deadline to Register: June 12

The UT Flute Camp is taught by musicians Joel Tse, principal flute for the Toledo Symphony Orchestra and UT flute instructor, and Amy Heritage, second flute with the Toledo Symphony Orchestra and Suzuki flute instructor. It is suitable for elementary age students through adults.
Special guests will present on instrument care, yoga and breathing, music and movement, and more. These extras are included in the track fees. A free, public concert performed by students will conclude the workshop on Friday, June 23, at 4 p.m.

There are two tracks to choose from:

Track 1 is for students who have been playing for one to three years. It runs from 9 a.m. to noon and is taught by Heritage. The cost for Track 1 is $150. Fees are due by the first day of the workshop.

Track 2 is for intermediate and advanced students and will run from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. This track is taught by Tse and Heritage. Track 2 is $300. Fees are due by the first day of the workshop.

Can’t attend all week? Sign up by the day. The cost is $65 per day for any track if attending less than the full week. Scholarships also are available to help cover fees; apply when you register.

To register or for more information, visit utoledo.edu/al/svpa/music/communitymusic/flutecamp.html.

Janus Vocal Arts Workshops — July 5-14
Deadline to Register: June 7

The Janus Vocal Arts Workshops offer professional development seminars and workshops in voice. In addition to the Emerging Artist track that studies and performs an opera, there is a High School Student track (July 10-14) which focuses on vocal technique and musical theatre. The two seminars — “Mind, Body, Voice” (July 7-8) and “Music as a Business” (July 12-13) — can be taken separately or together at a discount.

Registration, cost and discount information available online at utoledo.edu/al/svpa/music/communitymusic/janusvocalarts

Choral Conducting and Teaching Workshop — July 25-27
Deadline to Register July 1

This comprehensive and immersive choral conducting workshop is intended to serve and educate individuals as conductor, teacher, leader, scholar, performer and servant. Conductors will engage in sessions covering a wide variety of topics. This year’s workshop will allow conductors to choose from either a three-day immersion workshop or a one-day workshop. Teachers: This workshop will provide up to 18 contact hours of professional development.

There will be a limit of 15 spaces so that each conductor is allowed sufficient podium/conducting time. Coffee and a light breakfast will be provided in the morning. The three-day workshop is $300 if registered by July 1; $325 if registered after July 1. The one-day workshop is $100 if registered by July 1; $125 if registered after July 1. All sessions will be from from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., with a break for lunch (not provided).

Registration and information available are online at
utoledo.edu/al/svpa/music/communitymusic/summerchoral/choralworkshops.html.

Department of Art to present two workshops June 5-9

The UT Department of Art will offer two summer workshops for students ages 9 through high school. From Monday through Friday, June 5-9, Manga/Anime will be held in the morning, and Wizard School will take place in the afternoon. 

In the morning workshop, students will explore manga and anime design techniques across a range of media — hand-painted shoes, digital design, hats and more. Participants should bring a pair of new, white canvas tennis shoes; all other materials are provided.

Students in the Manga/Anime workshop will create hand-painted tennis shoes.

When students graduate from Wizard School, they’ll be equipped to unleash their creative inner wizard. Participants will make a wand; design a wizardry crest; concoct potion bottles; build a dark forest terrarium; create a plush creature; and develop and play wizard games. All materials will be provided.

Alissa Cox, an independent artist since 2006, will present the workshops.

Coming from a family of artisans and artists, Cox grew up learning woodcrafts, stained glass, blacksmithing, jewelry craft, quilting and painting. She moved her business, Smoky Grove, to Ohio in 2012 and has exhibited at Columbus Winterfair, the Great Lakes Jazz Festival and the Black Swamp Arts Festival. Cox has taught several workshops in pyrography, sewing and painting.

The cost is $60 per workshop or $105 to take both workshops.

Both workshops will be held in the Center for the Visual Arts on the University’s Toledo Museum of Art Campus.

To register, go to utoledo.edu/al/svpa/art/webforms/summerartworkshopsregform.html

New dean selected to lead College of Arts and Letters

An award-winning independent documentary filmmaker and scholar of women’s and gender studies will join The University of Toledo to lead the College of Arts and Letters.

She also is a familiar face on campus.

Gilbert

Charlene Gilbert will return to UT from Ohio State University at Lima, where she has served as dean and director since 2014, as well as professor in the departments of Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies. Her appointment will be effective July 10.

Prior to Lima, Gilbert worked at UT for seven years as professor and chair of the Department of Women’s and Gender Studies, founding director of the School of Interdisciplinary Studies, and director of the Catharine S. Eberly Center for Women.

“The University is excited to welcome Charlene Gilbert back to Toledo,” Dr. Andrew Hsu, provost and executive vice president for academic affairs, said. “Her excellent, diverse experience and enthusiasm for student and faculty success will be strong assets as dean of the College of Arts and Letters.”

“I am honored to have been selected as the next dean of the College of Arts and Letters,” Gilbert said. “This is an inspiring time for The University of Toledo, and it is clear to me that the College of Arts and Letters will be a critical part of the University’s highest aspirations for the future.”

Gilbert was a documentary filmmaker and professor at American University in Washington, D.C., from 2001 to 2007 in the School of Communication.

Her documentary films have been screened nationally on PBS and in film festivals across the country. Some of her best-known works include “Homecoming: Sometimes I Am Haunted by Memories of Red Dirt and Clay,” about African-American farmers and their struggle after the Civil War to own and farm land in the rural South, and “Children Will Listen,” which is about elementary school children planning and performing a junior production of Stephen Sondheim’s “Into the Woods” for the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C.

Her current projects include an experimental documentary on the international prototype for the kilogram and a documentary on Mary Fields, a female pioneer known as “Stagecoach Mary” who has ties to Toledo.

Gilbert is a past recipient of Harvard University’s Radcliffe Fellowship, the Rockefeller Media Arts Fellowship and the American Council on Education Fellowship.

She has a bachelor’s degree in economics and political science from Yale University and a master of fine arts in film and media arts from Temple University.

“The College of Arts and Letters has an incredibly talented community of faculty, staff and students,” Gilbert said. “I am looking forward to joining this community and building on the strong legacy of excellence that can be found in all of the departments and schools within the college.”

Once Gilbert’s appointment begins at UT, Dr. Jamie Barlowe will join the Provost’s Office full time as interim vice provost for faculty affairs.

Glacity Theatre Collective to explore artificial intelligence

It’s the age of artificial intelligence, and 85-year-old Marjorie — a jumble of disparate, fading memories — has a handsome new companion who’s programmed to feed the story of her life back to her.

The Glacity Theatre Collective will present “Marjorie Prime” Friday through Sunday, May 12-14, in the Center for Performing Arts Studio Theatre.

Mark Owen and Jennifer Nagy Lake rehearsed a scene from the Glacity Theatre Collective’s production of “Marjorie Prime” with Barbara Barkan in the background.

Curtain time is 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and 2 p.m. Sunday.

Barbara Barkan will play Marjorie, and Tanner DuVall will be her friend in Jordan Harrison’s Pulitzer-nominated work that explores memory and identity, love and loss, and the limits — if any — of what technology can replace.

Jennifer Nagy Lake, former UT theatre student, and Mark Owen also are in the cast.

Jeffrey J. Albright, former UT theatre student, is directing the production.

James S. Hill, UT professor emeritus of theatre, is the scene designer for the play. Holly Monsos, associate dean of the School of Visual and Performing Arts in the College of Arts and Letters, professor of theatre, and executive director of the Glacity Theatre Collective, designed the costumes.

Tickets are $15 at the door or in advance online at glacity.tix.org. Student tickets are $10 with a valid ID and are available only at the door.

For more information, go to glacity.org.

Study shows UT has $3.3 billion economic impact on community

The University of Toledo’s impact to the region’s economy totals $3.3 billion, according to a comprehensive study by UT economists.

That is equivalent to 9.7 percent of the region’s gross metropolitan area product.

“As the second largest employer in northwest Ohio with an enrollment of more than 20,000 students, we are proud to be one of Toledo’s anchor institutions contributing as a major force to the region’s growth and development,” UT President Sharon L. Gaber said. “The University of Toledo continues to work hard to strengthen the community.”

Dr. Oleg Smirnov, associate professor of economics, and Dr. Olugbenga Ajilore, associate professor of economics, completed the analysis this academic year.

“We show the short-term and cumulative, lasting contributions the institution makes to the region,” Smirnov said. “If the University had not been opened in Toledo 145 years ago, these impacts would not exist.”

The UT economists not only charted University, student and employee spending over the 2015-16 academic year and its ripple effect, they also calculated the long-term value of the educated workforce of UT alumni and faculty living in the area.

Of the $3.3 billion, $1.98 billion in economic growth and competitiveness is contributed by UT faculty and alumni who live in the region. Thirty-three percent of UT alumni have remained in the Toledo area after graduating.

UT is the top-ranked institution in the region for social mobility and second in Ohio. UT also ranks among the highest compared to other Ohio public research universities for income mobility.

“UT provides a path to success and professional opportunity for underrepresented and economically disadvantaged students who wouldn’t otherwise be able to access higher education,” Ajilore said. “Because of this University, they are thriving. Plus, many of them stay in the region and impact the economy once they graduate.”

Of the $3.3 billion in total economic impact, $1.35 billion goes from UT to the Toledo area through payroll, local purchases for day-to-day operations, and expenditures by students and visitors at local businesses. That includes direct impacts of $769 million, which lead to an additional $582 million in indirect and induced effects.

The study finds that for every job at UT, the local economy gains 2.6 full-time equivalent jobs.

According to the study, UT directly generates more than 5,000 full-time jobs, and economic activity by the University leads to the creation of over 8,000 additional direct and indirect jobs. A total of 13,498 jobs were created directly or indirectly because of UT’s presence.

UT’s 20,381 students and visitors to the campus contributed an estimated $340 million to the Toledo area economy in fiscal year 2015-16, according to the report.

Plus, Smirnov and Ajilore looked at state impact. They found that for every $1 invested by the state into UT, $10 of economic impact is generated to the local economy. University operations and associated economic activity contributed $44.4 million in state and local taxes.

“When it comes to supporting higher education, every dollar counts, and any change is felt widespread,” Smirnov said.

To read the full report, go to utoledo.edu/economic-impact.

Professor emeritus of art honored at YWCA Milestones

While speaking with Diana Attie, professor emeritus of art, there is no doubt the passion she has for her profession — and for sharing her love of it with her students.

“Design is all around us everywhere — great design and bad — from Teslas to T-shirts. But real art engages our personal life experience, our senses, our deep yearnings and empathy — and do not count out humor, or even absurdity,” Attie said. “Seeing, judgment and discernment can be rewarding responsibilities. To see, not merely to look, is a cultivated art in itself. The powers of mindful observation are most acutely developed through the concentrated act of drawing. The process is like the scientific method: intense observations, a vision of an outcome, experimentation, revision, repeat, and repeat again and again. Make your first 5,000 mistakes and think nothing of investing those necessary 10,000 hours of rehearsals.”

Diana Attie, center, posed for a photo at the YWCA of Northwest Ohio’s Milestones Awards ceremony with some of her former students, from left, independent artist Helen Grubb, 2011 UT graduate; Hannah Lehmann, an art teacher at Ottawa Hills High School, who received degrees from UT in 2011 and 2015; Elyse Simpko, an adjunct instructor in UT’s Department of Art, and a 2008 and 2012 UT alumna; and Danielle Rante, associate professor of art and art history at Wright State University, who received two degrees from UT in 2003. Attie was recognized for her leadership in the arts; she was nominated for the honor by artist Leslie Adams, a 1989 UT alumna.

This year, Attie received the Milestones Award for her outstanding leadership qualities in the field of art from the YWCA of Northwest Ohio. She also is a former recipient of UT’s Outstanding Teacher Award.

Her visionary example has opened doors for other women to follow.

“The Milestones Award has been given to exemplary women in the fields of science, government, business and the arts for 23 years. Standing with these luminous women is an honor because I have enormous respect for their work, dedication and accomplishments,” she said.

Attie received a master of arts degree in painting and drawing from the Cleveland Institute of Art and Case Western Reserve University. In 1962, she began teaching in the Toledo Museum of Art/UT joint degree program in art and art history. She has taught a wide range of studio courses in the Department of Art, including her popular Anatomy/Life Drawing course.

“Truthfully, my inspiration comes from each and every woman teacher I have had, and I can name every one, starting from kindergarten,” Attie said. “Their differing personalities, teaching styles, idiosyncrasies, and special talents add up to an aggregate sum of one ‘super teacher.’ I thank them for my love of learning.

“I am, however, forever grateful to the indefatigable Mary Ryan, who was supervisor of art in the public schools, a mentor throughout my college years, and who made me realize my capabilities. From the Cleveland Institute of Art and Case Western Reserve University, the inspirational Professor Franny Taft held me spellbound with the dynamic delivery of her art history lectures. I remember my thinking as a student — ‘How can she possibly know so many intricate details?’ Perhaps that is why a major credo of my studio teaching has been ‘within every detail, there is a detail.’”

When asked how she strived to foster leadership in her students, Attie replied, “Whether young women or young men, it is most meaningful to find and do what you love, and love what you do. Listen and communicate clearly with others and in the arts particularly, receive and give critique in a constructive, positive light. Read — not just the art journals. Expand your inquiries into all manner of topics, especially science. Therein comes a freshness and cross-fertilization of ideas. Try to give 110 percent to what you want to do. Be relentless.”

For more information about YWCA of Northwest Ohio or Milestones Awards, visit ywcanwo.org.

Distinguished University Lecturers named

Three Distinguished University Lecturers were recognized April 20 during a ceremony in Doermann Theater.

“Appointment to the rank of Distinguished University Lecturer is the highest permanent honor The University of Toledo can bestow on a lecturer,” Dr. Andrew Hsu, provost and executive vice president for academic affairs, said.

“Those named Distinguished University Lecturer have earned recognition and distinction as educators, advancing student learning, facilitating and supporting student success, and demonstrating a commitment to the University’s educational mission.”

The duration of the appointment as a Distinguished University Lecturer is unlimited, and the title may be retained after a lecturer has retired from the University.

The three Distinguished University Lecturers, holding their certificates from left, Dr. Susanne Nonekowski, Dr. Joseph Hara and Teresa Keefe, posed for a photo during the April 20 ceremony in Doermann Theater with, from left, Dr. Andrew Hsu, provost and executive vice president for academic affairs; President Sharon L. Gaber; and Dr. Jamie Barlowe, interim vice provost for faculty affairs and dean of the College of Arts and Letters.

Faculty eligible for the designation are assistant, associate and senior lecturers.

Named Distinguished University Lecturers were:

• Dr. Joseph Hara, senior lecturer in the Department of Foreign Languages in the College of Arts and Letters. He has taught at UT since 1987, first as a Japanese instructor and then as a lecturer. He is the director of the Japanese Program.

“Dr. Hara developed a minor degree program in Japanese, now the second highest enrolled Japanese program in the state, following Ohio State University,” one nominator wrote. “Dr. Hara is well-known for never saying no to a student who needs his support and for his promotion of study abroad, taking students to Japan each summer for cultural and language immersion, as well as developing exchange programs with Japanese universities, including Aichi University. Some UT graduates were able to successfully find jobs in Japan after their degree completion because of the programs that Dr. Hara established and continues to lead. His exemplary teaching evaluations also attest to the impact he has on the lives and the success of students. He received the University Outstanding Teaching Award in 2002.”

• Teresa Keefe, senior lecturer in the Department of Information Operations and Technology Management in the College of Business and Innovation. She has been teaching at UT 13 years. Keefe is the faculty adviser to the Association for Information Technology Professionals.

“She continuously develops new and innovative courses, incorporating new technologies, and providing active learning experiences for her students, including flipped classes and service learning, all contributing to student retention and graduation rates,” one nominator wrote. “Over my 37 years at the University, I have never seen the likes of Teresa in terms of teaching, service and dedication to the betterment of students.” A former student wrote, “If I was asked who outside my immediate family had the largest impact on my education and professional growth, without hesitation, ‘Teresa Keefe’ would be blurted out.” And another graduate noted, “I owe my success to Teresa Keefe. She is an exceedingly wonderful professor, mentor and friend. The amount of dedication that she pours into her passion daily is inspiring.”

• Dr. Susanne Nonekowski, associate lecturer in the Department of Medicinal and Biological Chemistry in the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. She began teaching at the University in 2001.

“Dr. Nonekowski is often the earliest adopter of active learning methods such as clickers and Blackboard chat rooms; she won an Assessment Award in the college in 2014 and mentors other faculty who are incorporating assessment in their courses,” one nominator wrote. “She received an Innovations in Teaching Award in 2015, and she was nominated for a University Outstanding Teaching Award in 2010.” A graduate wrote, “I believe that Dr. N. is truly in a league all her own when it comes to her teaching style, her abundant ability, and her academic perspective. She is not only compassionate and knowledgeable, but also a lecturer who makes learning interesting and fun.” A student wrote, “It is clear that the instructor really knows her stuff, and her passion and understanding for the material had a great impact on my learning.”

‘Wearable Conditions,’ BFA Thesis exhibitions this week

This year’s “Wearable Conditions” exhibition will be held Thursday, April 27, at 6 p.m. in the Toledo Museum of Art’s Glass Pavilion.

“Students in the School of Visual Art’s Department of Art have created extraordinary hybrids of sculpture plus fashion plus research to fabricate runway-ready works of art,” Brian Carpenter, UT gallery director and lecturer in the Art Department, said. “Students dove into analysis of diseases such as Type 1 diabetes, delusional disorder and neuroblastoma.  

“HIV/AIDs” by Shelly Trivisonno is from last year’s “Wearable Conditions” exhibit.

“Students worked to understand the impact of these conditions on the individuals who suffer with the disease and those who care for the afflicted. They even worked with physician partners and heath-care workers to familiarize themselves with the toll the diseases take on their victims,” he said.

Students employed costuming techniques, old and cutting-edge technologies, sewing machines and computer numerical control machines to craft dramatic sculptural responses to the conceptualization of the particular virus, disorder or disease they chose to study. 

In addition to the exhibition, there will be lectures by Brian Kennedy, president, director and CEO of the Toledo Museum of Art, and Dr. Mysoon Rizk, UT associate professor of art history and director of the Roger Ray Institute for the Humanities.   

Doors will open at 5:30 p.m., and the show will begin at 6 p.m. at the TMA Glass Pavilion. 

Due to limited seating in the Glass Pavilion, the show will be streamed live in the Center for the Visual Arts Haigh Auditorium on the University’s Toledo Museum of Art Campus.  

Immediately following the “Wearable Conditions” exhibition, there will be a reception for the BFA Thesis Exhibition in the Center for the Visual Arts Gallery. 

This exhibition features works by eight graduating students who will receive bachelor of fine arts degrees. The work spans multiple mediums, including photography, ceramics, painting and virtual reality.  

The works will be on display through Wednesday, May 3.

For more information on the free, public exhibitions, contact Carpenter at brian.carpenter@utoledo.edu.

These archival pigment prints by Sebastien Schohn are featured in the BFA Thesis Exhibition.