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Department of Theatre and Film to hold auditions for two productions

The University of Toledo Department of Theatre and Film will hold two sets of auditions this fall.

The first auditions, for the play “The Pillowman,” will be held Monday and Tuesday, Oct. 22-23.

The second set will be for the musical “Into the Woods” and will be held Tuesday and Wednesday, Nov. 13-14.

All auditions will take place from 6 to 9 p.m. in the Center for Performing Arts Studio Theatre.

Auditions are open to everyone, including members of the community. Cast members do not need to be UT students. Parking is free during the auditions.

For the play auditions, participants should prepare a one-minute monologue that must be memorized. For the musical, they must prepare a theatre song.

Scripts are available for a 24-hour loan period and are in the department office. Sign-up sheets and audition forms are posted on the production call board near the dressing rooms in the Center for Performing Arts. Audition forms can be filled out in advance, but they must be brought to the audition. Additional audition forms will be available the evening of tryouts.

Performances for “The Pillowman” will be held Feb. 1-10. Performances for the “Into the Woods” are April 5-20. Rehearsal schedules will be determined after the shows are cast.

Written by Martin McDonagh, “The Pillowman” will be directed by Quincy Joyner, UT assistant lecturer of theatre. The play is about a fiction writer who is interrogated by police because the content of his stories is horrifyingly similar to a string of recent child murders.

“Into the Woods” will be directed by Dr. Edmund Lingan, UT professor and chair of theatre. Based on the book by James Lapine, the production features music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim. Four fictional characters are taken out of their fairy tale stories and given the chance to make their deepest wishes come true. The characters find themselves on a quest that somehow becomes intertwined with the other characters’ journeys.

UT faculty recognized for tenure and promotion

Sixty-four University of Toledo faculty members were honored in a special 2018-19 tenure and promotion celebration Sept. 28 in Carlson Library. Last year, 53 faculty members earned tenure and promotion.

Each honoree was asked to select a book that was instrumental to his or her success, and these books — each containing a bookplate commemorating the honoree’s milestone — are now housed in the library.

“We began this tradition when I joined UT because we believe recognizing faculty helps to foster excellence in research and academics, and helps fuel innovation in all fields of study,” said President Sharon L. Gaber.

“Faculty success, together with student success, are two of the highest priorities of the University and of the Office of the Provost,” said Provost Andrew Hsu. “We have implemented a number of new programs to enhance faculty success since President Gaber joined The University of Toledo. And while the large number of faculty honorees this year demonstrates the progress that we have made in faculty success, the credit goes to the hard work and dedication of our faculty.”

UT faculty receiving tenure are Dr. Hossein Elgafy and Dr. Xin Wang, College of Medicine and Life Sciences.

Appointed as professor with tenure are Dr. Anne Balazs, College of Business and Innovation, and Dr. Raymond Witte, Judith Herb College of Education. And appointed as associate professor with tenure is Dr. Denise Bartell, Jesup Scott Honors College.

Faculty members who were promoted to professor are Dr. Tomer Avidor-Reiss, Dr. Maria Diakonova, Dr. Timothy Mueser and Dr. Michael Weintraub, College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics; Dr. Amanda Bryant-Friedrich and Dr. Frederick Williams, College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences; Dr. Florian Feucht and Dr. Tod Shockey, Judith Herb College of Education; Dr. Bashar Gammoh and Dr. Margaret Hopkins, College of Business and Innovation; Dr. Tavis Glassman and Dr. Sheryl Milz, College of Health and Human Services; Dr. Edmund Lingan, Dr. Mysoon Rizk, Dr. Sujata Shetty and Dr. Jami Taylor, College of Arts and Letters; Elizabeth McCuskey and Evan Zoldan, College of Law; Dr. Azedine Medhkour, Dr. Theodor Rais, Dr. Tallat Rizk and Dr. David Sohn, College of Medicine and Life Sciences; and Dr. Devinder Kaur, Dr. Scott Molitor, Dr. Youngwoo Seo, Dr. Gursel Serpen, Dr. Chunhua Sheng, Dr. Sridhar Viamajala and Dr. Hongyan Zhang, College of Engineering.

Promoted to professor with tenure are Dr. Guillermo Vazquez and Dr. Hongyan Li, College of Medicine and Life Sciences.

Faculty members who received tenure and promotion to associate professor include Dr. Wissam AbouAlaiwi, College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences; Dr. Halim Ayan and Dr. Eda Yildirim-Ayan, College of Engineering; Dr. Liat Ben-Moshe, Daniel Hernandez, Dr. Jason Levine, Dr. Thor Mednick and Dr. Daniel Thobias, College of Arts and Letters; Dr. Joseph Cooper and Dr. Kainan Wang, College of Business and Innovation; Dr. Rafael Garcia-Mata, College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics; Dr. Mouhammad Jumaa, Dr. Krishna Reddy and Dr. Diana Shvydka, College of Medicine and Life Sciences; and Dr. Aravindhan Natarajan, College of Health and Human Services.

Faculty promoted to associate professor are Dr. Daniel Gehling, Dr. Claudiu Georgescu, Dr. Bryan Hinch, Dr. Kimberly Jenkins, Dr. Jeremy Laukka, Dr. Terrence Lewis, Dr. Jiayong Liu, Dr. Sumon Nandi and Dr. Syed Zaidi, College of Medicine and Life Sciences; and Dr. Randall Vesely, Judith Herb College of Education.

Faculty who received renewal of their titles with tenure are Michelle Cavalieri and Bryan Lammon, College of Law.

And Dr. George Darah was promoted to clinical associate professor in the College of Medicine and Life Sciences.

“We wish each of these individuals continued success at the University, and ask our campus community to join us in congratulating them,” Hsu said.

Faculty members posed for a photo with President Sharon L. Gaber and Provost Andrew Hsu during the tenure and promotion celebration held last month in Carlson Library.

UPDATED: Filmmaker to show documentary on racism

“Man on Fire,” a documentary about racism, will be screened Thursday, Oct. 18, at 6 p.m. in the Thompson Student Union Auditorium.

Director Joel Fendelman will introduce the work and lead a question-and-answer session after the screening.

However, the workshop scheduled for Friday, Oct. 19, has been canceled.

“Man on Fire” focuses on Grand Saline, Texas, which has a history of racism, a history the community refuses to talk about. This shroud of secrecy ended when Charles Moore, an elderly white preacher, self-immolated to protest the town’s racism in 2014, shining a spotlight on the town’s dark past.

In the 2017 film, Fendelman and Dr. James Chase Sanchez examined the protest and question the racism in Grand Saline as it stands today.

“It’s important for people to realize that things like racism and race relations do not exist in a vacuum,” Jennifer Pizio, associate director in the UT Office for Diversity and Inclusion, said. “By taking time to learn about the historical context within which a situation arises, we are better able to grasp the why and how so we can do things differently and, hopefully, better.”

The free, public event is co-sponsored by the Office of Diversity and Inclusion; the College of Arts and Letters; the Roger Ray Institute for the Humanities; the Department of English, Language and Literature; the Department of History; and the Department of Theatre and Film.

For more information, contact the Office of Diversity and Inclusion at 419.530.2260.

Varsity ‘T’ Hall of Fame to induct 2018 class

The University of Toledo Varsity ‘T’ Hall of Fame will induct nine former student-athletes Friday, Oct. 19, at the Hilton Garden Inn in Perrysburg.

Social hour for the event will begin at 6 p.m., and dinner will follow at 7 p.m. The class also will be introduced at halftime of the UT football game vs. Buffalo Saturday, Oct. 20.

Tickets for the Varsity ‘T’ Hall of Fame induction dinner are $45 or $360 for a table of eight and can be purchased by calling the Athletic Development Office at 419.530.5087.

The 2018 Varsity ‘T’ Hall of Fame inductees are:

Lurley Archambeau, football, 1963 to 1965. He was a three-year starter, playing in the first three years of legendary Rocket Coach Frank Lauterbur’s tenure. In his sophomore and junior seasons, Archambeau started on both the offensive and defensive lines, one of the last two-way players in UT history. He also played on all special teams, meaning he did not come off the field during games. As a senior, Archambeau was the starting center on a team that went 5-5. After graduation, Archambeau was drafted in the 17th round by the Atlanta Falcons, but an injury ended his football career. After graduation, he attended medical school and became the first president of the first class of the former Medical College of Ohio. He has been in private psychiatry practice in Toledo for the past 43 years and has served his alma mater as a counselor for Rocket student-athletes for four decades.

Andy Boyd, football, 1998 to 2001. He was a walk-on who became a four-year starter at safety. During his collegiate career, Boyd always seemed to make the big play in the biggest games. Boyd totaled 314 tackles and 10 interceptions. He made the Mid-American Conference Academic Honor Roll in 1999, 2000 and 2001. During his junior year in 2000, he also was named All-MAC by the Sporting News. Boyd also was named UT’s Most Outstanding Defensive back in 1999, 2000 and 2001. During Boyd’s time at UT, the Rockets had a 33-13 record (22-8 MAC) and won MAC West Division titles in 1998, 2000 and 2001. In Boyd’s senior year, the Rockets won the MAC Championship and 2001 Motor City Bowl. He had 76 tackles and three interceptions as a redshirt freshman in 1998, making the Football News’ First-Team Freshman All-American squad and Football News’ All-MAC First-Team. He also received the Norman Cohen award for UT’s Most Outstanding Freshman football player in 1998. His biggest play came in the fourth quarter with an interception against Central Michigan that set up the game-winning field goal to help Toledo take the MAC West Division title. Boyd had 61 tackles and three interceptions as a sophomore, and 95 tackles and three picks as a junior in 2000. That 2000 team went 10-1 and was one of the strongest defensive teams ever at UT, racking up three shutouts and holding opponents to 14 points or fewer in seven games. Boyd made the game-saving tackle on the final play in a 31-26 defeat of Tony Romo and Eastern Illinois that season. In 2001, Boyd was named a team captain. He had 82 tackles and one interception. He broke up the potential game-winning pass in the end zone on fourth down to clinch Toledo’s 23-16 victory over Cincinnati in the 2001 Motor City Bowl. After graduation, Boyd served the Rockets as a volunteer coach (2002), a graduate assistant coach (2003 to 2004), and assistant coach (2005 to 2009) and director of high school relations (2010). While on the coaching staff, Boyd recruited First-Team All-MAC players Barry Church, Archie Donald, Jermaine Robinson and Eric Page. Church and Page would go on to become All-Americans. Boyd went into private business in 2010 and returned to the program as color commentator on Rocket football broadcasts from 2011 to 2015.

Sean Dobson
, baseball, 2001 to 2004. He made First-Team All-MAC, First-Team All-Region and was named an All-American by College Baseball Insider.com in 2004. He hit .394 that season and set UT records for total bases (152), RBIs (63) and doubles (23), while also scoring 60 runs. He led the team in hitting in 2002 with a .387 average, knocking in 34 runs and scoring 33. In 2003, he hit .367 and led the team with 60 runs scored. Dobson finished his career as UT’s leader in runs, hits and doubles. He ranks second in batting average (.371), third in runs (159) and hits (249), fourth in total bases (356), tied for fourth in doubles (46), and seventh in RBI (131). An outfielder, Dobson was drafted by the St. Louis Cardinals in the 40th round of the 2004 Major League Baseball draft.

Ari Fisher, women’s track and field/cross country, 2008 to 2012. Fisher made All-MAC six times in her career as a distance runner, three times in cross country and three times in track and field. She is one of only five runners in MAC history to win back-to-back cross country titles, achieving that feat in 2009 and 2010. She qualified for the NCAA Cross Country Championship Meet three times in her career, earning All-America honors in 2010. Fisher won the individual title as a sophomore in 2009, pacing UT to a second-place finish. She then took ninth place at the NCAA Regionals and qualified for her first NCAA Championship Meet. A year later, she won the MAC title again, leading the Rockets to a MAC title. She was third at the NCAA Regionals and 26th at the NCAA Championship Meet. In 2011, Fisher came in third place at the MAC Championships as UT again won the team title. She was 17th at the NCAA Regionals and 76th at the NCAA Championship Meet, helping UT to its highest national finish ever (21st place). Injuries hampered her track career, but she was named the league’s Outstanding Distance Runner at the 2010 Indoor Championship when she won the 5K by more than 26 seconds. In 2011, she set the MAC record in the 5K at the Iowa State meet. Her time of 16:04.56 was one of the top 10 fastest times in the world that year. She was one of the favorites to win the 5K at the NCAA Indoor Championships that year, but an injury forced her to withdraw from the race. In 2012, she won the 10K at the MAC Outdoor Championships.

Laura Lindsay, women’s swimming and diving, 2008 to 2011. She was a two-time All-American and three-time All-MAC swimmer who helped lead Toledo to MAC Championships in 2010 and 2012. She earned All-America honors in the breaststroke in 2011 and 2012, the only Rocket woman swimmer to make All-America twice in her career. In 2012, Lindsay swam the fifth fastest time at the NCAA Championships in the 100-yard breaststroke, swimming in the B final and winning the event. She also swam the 200-yard breaststroke at the NCAA Championships twice, making her a four-time NCAA qualifier. Lindsay set three MAC records in the breaststroke and still holds two all-time UT individual records, as well as the MAC record in the 200 breast (2:09.72). Over her career, Lindsay won six MAC titles, one each in the 100 and 200 breaststroke, and four in medley relays. As a sophomore, Lindsay was part of the MAC Championship 200- and 400-medley relay teams, earning second-team all-conference. A year later, Lindsay finished in second place in both the 100- and 200-breaststroke, taking home First-Team All-MAC honors. As a senior, she won both of those races at the MAC Championships, as well as participating in the 200- and 400-medley relay teams that won league titles. Lindsay, who was named Toledo’s team MVP in 2011 and 2012, was a USA Olympic top 10 qualifier in the 100- and 200-breaststroke in 2012, and top 25 qualifier in 2016.

Jared Miller, men’s tennis, 2005 to 2009. He was a four-time All-MAC tennis player and three-time team captain during his collegiate career. His overall record was 128-108, including a 42-28 mark at No.1 singles and No. 1 doubles as a senior. He earned a spot on the All-MAC Tournament Team in 2008 and 2009. In his senior year, Miller helped lead the Rockets to the MAC Tournament title match, their best finish in 36 years, and was ranked No. 8 in doubles in the Midwest Region. Miller was a three-time Academic All-MAC choice and was twice named MAC Male Scholar-Athlete of the Week. In 2009, he earned the MAC Men’s Tennis Senior Sportsmanship Award and the Intercollegiate Tennis Association Division I Men’s Midwest Arthur Ashe Sportsmanship Award. Miller nabbed numerous team awards, including Newcomer of the Year (2005-06); Most Improved Player (2005-06 and 2006-07); Team Leadership Award (2006-07, 2007-08, 2008-09) and Most Valuable Player (all four years). In 2009, Miller was voted UT’s Most Valuable Male Senior by the UT Student-Athlete Advisory Committee. In 2009, he was honored for having the highest GPA among all UT male student-athletes. Miller graduated with a bachelor’s degree in chemistry with concentration in biochemistry. He went to medical school and works in general pediatrics and primary care sports medicine with St. Vincent Medical Group in Kokomo, Ind.

Eric Page, football, 2009 to 2011. Page’s 306 receptions are the most in Toledo history and the 12th most in NCAA history. He also leads Toledo with 3,446 receiving yards. He holds the single-season mark for catches, snagging 125 passes as a junior in 2011, and ranks first all-time in career kickoff return average (27.3). Page was a three-time All-MAC selection who earned first-team All-America honors as a kickoff returner in 2010, a year in which he averaged 31.1 yards per return and scored three TDs. In 2009, Page led the nation’s freshmen with 82 receptions and 1,159 receiving yards. He earned second-team All-MAC honors and was named a Freshman All-American by Phil Steele and College Football News. As a sophomore, Page caught 99 passes and was named First-Team All-MAC as both a receiver and kickoff returner. He was selected by Walter Camp and the Sporting News as a First-Team All-American at kickoff returner, the first Rocket to make first-team on a major All-America team since Gene Swick in 1975. He also was named MAC Special Teams Player of the Year and the National Kickoff Returner of the Year by College Football Performance Awards. In his junior season, Page became only the third person in NCAA Football Bowl Subdivision history to make First-Team All-League at three positions: wide receiver, kickoff returner and punt returner. He shattered the UT reception mark by catching 125 passes and was one of four national finalists for the Paul Hornung Award, given annually to the nation’s most versatile player. He set the UT record and tied Randy Moss’ MAC record when he caught five TD passes in one game vs. Northern Illinois in 2011. At the end of his college career, he was tied for the most career receptions by any player in MAC history.

Lena Richards-Crider, softball, 1995 to 1996. She is a two-time First-Team All-MAC selection. As a junior in 1995, she led the Rockets in nine categories: slugging percentage (.439), runs (40), hits, (69), at-bats (212 — which ties for fifth place in MAC history), doubles (13), sacrifices (18), total bases (93), stolen bases (12) and home runs (3). These impressive season stats helped her earn a spot on the First-Team All-MAC and First-Team All-Mideast Region lists. She was the MAC’s Hitter of the Week and was nominated for National Hitter of the Week after batting .600 (12 for 20) with seven RBI, four runs scored, three sacrifices, two doubles, and a grand slam over six games against No. 6 Michigan and Eastern Michigan (1995). She also pitched an 8-0 shutout over Eastern Michigan during that same stretch. In 1996, Richards-Crider made First-Team All-MAC again. She was named MAC Co-Hitter of the Week April 15 after hitting .692 (9 for 13) with two runs, one double, and a pair of stolen bases. Richards-Crider is vice president of development and marketing for A Kid Again, a nonprofit organization in Columbus, Ohio, that works to foster hope, happiness and healing for families raising children with life-threatening illnesses.

Naama Shafir, women’s basketball, 2008 to 2013. She was a four-time All-MAC selection and is one of only two players (Kim Knuth) in program history to earn all-conference accolades on four occasions. Shafir wrapped up her collegiate career ranked first in UT annals in assists (722, third most in MAC history), minutes played (4,218), games played (139) and games started (139). She also ranked second in free-throw attempts (696), third in steals (227) and made free throws (538), fourth in field-goal attempts (1,476), and fifth in points (1,874). Additionally, Shafir was sixth in field goals made (601), seventh in free-throw percentage (.773), and tied for ninth in scoring average (13.5 points per game). As a freshman, Shafir averaged 11.7 points and 4.5 assists, earning honorable mention All-MAC honors. A year later, she earned second-team all-league honors, averaging 14.3 points and 6.7 assists, leading UT to the MAC Championship title game for the first time since 2001. As a junior in the 2010-11 season, Shafir averaged 15.3 points and 5.1 assists, earning First-Team All-MAC honors. The Rockets finished in first place in the MAC that year and went on to win the WNIT Championship. She was named MVP of the tournament, scoring 40 points against USC in the championship game, a 76-68 Rocket victory before a record crowd in Savage Arena. Shafir played in only four games in 2011-12 due to a knee injury, but came back in 2012-13 to lead UT to a 29-4 record (15-1 MAC). She once again earned First-Team All-MAC honors, averaging 12.8 points and 4.6 assists. She was runner-up for MAC Player of the Year and a regional finalist for the Women’s Basketball Coaches Association’s All-America Team. An excellent student, Shafir earned Academic All-MAC honors three times. She was part of the winningest class in school history, helping UT post a 107-31 overall ledger and a 54-10 MAC mark, with two MAC regular-season titles (2010-11, 2012-13), and four-consecutive MAC West-Division crowns, as well as advancing to the postseason each year. After graduation, Shafir returned to her native Israel, where she has played professional basketball for Elitzur Ramla, Maccabi Ramat Hen and Maccabi Bnot Ashdod.

UT scholar’s ‘The Oxford Handbook of Disability History’ offers first global chronicle

A pioneering professor of disability studies at The University of Toledo is an editor and contributor to “The Oxford Handbook of Disability History.”

Dr. Kim Nielsen, who helped launch the first undergraduate degree of its kind in disability studies in the country at UT, is one of three editors of the book published by Oxford University Press and one of 30 experts to write a chapter.

Dr. Kim Nielsen is one of three editors of the “The Oxford Handbook of Disability History” and one of 30 experts to write a chapter.

“Disability has a generally unacknowledged or even enthusiastically denied universality,” Nielsen said. “The book is the first volume to represent the global scale of this history, from ancient Greece to British West Africa and post-World War II Hungary and contemporary Japan.”

The cover of the book was designed by a group of artists who work together at Shared Lives Studio in downtown Toledo.

“We wanted meaningful, quality art done by a person or persons with disabilities, and we found it,” Nielsen said. “Their work is beautiful.”

Nielsen’s co-editor Dr. Michael Rembis, associate professor in the Department of History and director of the Center for Disability Studies at the University at Buffalo, will host a public lecture at UT titled “A Fact Was No Less a Fact Because It Was Told by a Crazy Person” Wednesday, Oct. 17, at 4 p.m. in Carlson Library Room 1005.

“Dr. Rembis is a skilled historian and storyteller whose work can help us better understand today’s mental health practices and helps us remember that people considered mentally ill also live lives with family, labor, community institutions and day-to-day interactions,” Nielsen said. “This scholarship should be of interest to all interested in public health policies, disability, history, psychology and social change.”

In the introduction to the new book, the editors wrote, “By its very nature, an Oxford Handbook offers legitimacy to disability history, an indication of the field’s growing import.”

Nielsen’s book chapter is titled “The Perils and Promises of Disability Biography.”

“Telling the life story of someone whose life included disability, unpacking the relationship between that individual life and its larger historical context, and analyzing the questions and insights raised by that life have much to offer scholars and readers,” Nielsen wrote.

“A disability analysis does not simply mean discerning whether or not historical subjects have a disability, just as a gender or racial analysis does not simply mean discerning the race or sex of historical subjects. A disability approach analyzes the role of ableism — built structures and social systems that favor the nondisabled — in shaping relationships, systems of power, ideals, disparagements, and the multiple ways of being in the world.”

Nielsen fights back against the common narrative of disability in the Western world that an individual overcomes or “triumphs over the calamity of disability.”

She uses President Franklin Roosevelt as an example showing that his life reveals the embedded nature of disability.

“From the time he was first affected by polio as a young adult to his death while in his fourth term as the U.S. president, the wealthy son of a prestigious New York family was aided by an extensive network of individuals willing to help him pass as nondisabled,” Nielsen wrote. “The FDR that most of us know and admire today was made possible by an intimate network of support; an American public that variably denied, ignored or was ignorant of his disability; and historians who followed that path.”

Nielsen also discusses the use of primary sources, the opportunities to analyze previously unconsidered sources, and reconsidering the imbalanced power dynamics used to create and archive historical sources.

“For example, many, if not all, of the photographs of Millie and Christine McKoy, conjoined twins born into slavery in 1851, made under the guise of science, were sexually exploitive, coerced and sensationalistic,” Nielsen wrote. “Many people with disabilities live and have lived in times and spaces where they have no recognized right or access to privacy.”

As a historian who is not disabled, Nielsen opens up about the importance of visiting places central to individuals who were overlooked or hidden away from society, such as her visit to the grave of the subject of her current biographical project, Dr. Anna Ott, a white female physician who died in 1893 after being determined legally incompetent and institutionalized for 20 years in a state insane asylum as a patient of one of her former male colleagues.

Of the 771 people buried at the “nearly unmarked cemetery” over a nearly 100-year period, Nielsen said, “Only eight of the dead had the privilege of grave markers. The rest lay unnamed and largely unclaimed. The disregard with which they had been treated in death revealed much about their lives.”

Nielsen also said that disability biography can be about nondisabled subjects, such as Frances Perkins, who “served as secretary of labor in the Franklin Roosevelt administration, while simultaneously mothering a daughter, providing exclusive financial support for her household, and caring for/managing her frequently institutionalized husband.”

“Perkins was not disabled, but disability permeated her life,” Nielsen wrote.

Nielson’s most recent book, “A Disability History of the United States,” was published by Beacon Press in 2012.

Scholar to discuss mass incarceration epidemic

Dr. John F. Pfaff, professor of law at Fordham University, will visit The University of Toledo this week to give two talks on prison reform.

He is the author of the 2017 book, “Locked In: The True Causes of Mass Incarceration and How to Achieve Real Reform.”

Pfaff

“Dr. Pfaff’s research shows that only by reducing the power and discretion of public prosecutors and reducing the length of prison sentences for violent offenses will we see any significant reduction in prison populations,” said Dr. Renee Heberle, UT professor of political science and co-director of the UT Law and Social Thought Program.

Pfaff spent 15 years researching imprisonment data to try to understand the 40-year boom in U.S. incarceration rates.

“The statistics are as simple as they are shocking: The United States is home to 5 percent of the world’s population but 25 percent of its prisoners,” he wrote in the introduction to “Locked In.”

“Mass incarceration is one of the biggest social problems the United States faces today; our sprawling prison system imposes staggering economic, social, political and racial costs,” he wrote.

On Tuesday, Oct. 16, Pfaff will give a talk titled “Moving Past the Standard Story: Rethinking the Causes of Mass Incarceration” at 7 p.m. in the Driscoll Alumni Center Auditorium.

And on Wednesday, Oct. 17, Pfaff will discuss “Sentencing Violent Offenders: Rethinking How We Confront Mass Incarceration” at 11:50 a.m. in Law Center Room 1002.

“Professor Pfaff will discuss his research and recent book, which illuminates the previously underappreciated roles prosecutorial discretion and sentencing policy have played in driving up prison populations,” said Dr. Renee Heberle, UT professor of political science and co-director of the UT Law and Social Thought Program.

“While it is common to focus on recidivism rates, crime rates and nonviolent drug offenders as causes for mass incarceration, Dr. Pfaff’s careful empirical approach makes very clear that only limiting prosecutorial power and significantly reducing the length of sentences will ultimately render mass incarceration obsolete,” she said.

The free, public events are sponsored by the UT College of Law and the UT Law and Social Thought Program.

For more information, contact Heberle at renee.heberle@utoledo.edu.

UT, Toledo Museum of Art partner to advance visual literacy

The University of Toledo and Toledo Museum of Art announced Friday a strengthened partnership that will advance visual literacy education.

The new initiative will provide opportunities for UT students across all majors to master the ability to “speak visual” through targeted curriculum modules incorporated into their existing course offerings.

The Association of College & Research Libraries defines visual literacy as a set of abilities that enables an individual to effectively find, interpret, evaluate, use and create images and visual media. Visual literacy is a skill that is critical to effective communication, creativity and design thinking.

UT President Sharon L. Gaber and TMA Director Brian Kennedy signed a memorandum of understanding for the collaboration at a ceremony Oct. 12 in the Museum’s Great Gallery.

“This collaboration will provide our students engaging lessons within their disciplines that will give them a step up when it comes to better explaining their complex scientific data graphically or connecting in a new way with the community to solve important social issues,” Gaber said. “Visual literacy is an important skill for our students who are the future leaders of our community and our world. We are excited to strengthen our partnership with the museum to advance this discipline.”

“Learning to read, understand and write visual language is an ability that helps all aspects of life,” Kennedy said. “The visually literate person uses sensory skills for critical thinking, by better interpreting the world around us, thereby advancing opportunity for a more productive and engaged life.”

This collaboration leverages the strengths of TMA’s Center of Visual Expertise and the Museum’s experience teaching visual literacy to young K-12 students, as well as professionals in the industrial and manufacturing fields, in combination with the strengths of UT’s Center for the Visual Arts in art education, Jesup Scott Honors College in interdisciplinary learning, and UT Libraries in supporting information literacy.

The initiative began with a pilot honors seminar course co-taught by UT and museum educators and an elective for medical students called Art and Medicine: Using Visual Literacy to Improve Diagnostic Skills.

The curriculum module options will be expanded to be available to all courses on campus. The goal is to have the visual literacy modules adopted into at least 20 additional courses in spring semester.

The effort is led by Dr. Heidi Appel, dean of the UT Jesup Scott Honors College, and Mike Deetsch, director of education and engagement at TMA, and involves a team of approximately 20 faculty and staff from both institutions who are contributing their time to this partnership.

The visual literacy initiative was made possible, in part, with financial support from Judith Herb, a generous longtime supporter of both institutions.

Day of Giving set for Oct. 16

The University of Toledo provides students with so many opportunities for success, and UT’s annual Day of Giving is a chance for the entire campus community to help students reach their goals by giving to Rocket Forward: You Launch Lives.

Alumni, faculty and staff members, students and friends of the University who support its mission are encouraged to give during this second annual Day of Giving. The fundraising campaign will begin at midnight Tuesday, Oct. 16, and will last until noon Wednesday, Oct. 17.

Every donor and every dollar will make a difference in this 36-hour campaign to raise money for student scholarships, athletic and educational programs, and resources for UT’s academic colleges, among many other areas.

“We encourage Rockets everywhere to join together on Oct. 16 and 17 to give back and have a significant impact on the lives of our students and all that The University of Toledo does to support them,” UT President Sharon L. Gaber said. “Philanthropy is essential to continuing the University’s mission to educate the next generation of leaders. I look forward to the possibilities of the combined efforts of our global, national and local alumni and friends when they support our Day of Giving and keep UT moving forward.”

Participation is an important goal for Day of Giving, which aims to encourage as many people as possible to support the University. Gift matches and gift challenges are ideal options for making a donation because they double the investment and double the impact.

In 2017, an anonymous donor challenged the colleges to compete for Day of Giving participants to support them. The College of Nursing and the College of Arts and Letters led the colleges, garnering the support of 99 and 95 donors, respectively. The colleges also received the additional $5,000 (Nursing) and $4,000 (Arts and Letters) for their progress funds via the donor’s gift.

“Last year was our first Day of Giving and it was a huge success,” said Charlene Gilbert, dean and professor of the College of Arts and Letters. “Our faculty and staff had the second highest number of donors. Their generosity demonstrated their deep belief in the mission of the University and the college. The money raised last year allowed us to provide strategic support to students who were close to graduating and just needed a little financial assistance. The result of that was our ability to graduate a record number of students and contribute to the University’s overall increase in our six-year graduation rate.”

Despite the rain last year on Day of Giving, students, faculty and staff members came out to Centennial Mall for free cupcakes handed out by the president, to hear the UT Rocket Marching Band perform, and to cozy up with some canines at a popular dog-petting station. Multiple activities are planned for Oct. 16 to celebrate the day and raise awareness of the opportunity to give.

For early risers, the Student Recreation Center will offer a Rise and Shine cycling class at 6:15 a.m. Oct. 16. With a $5 donation to Rocket Forward: You Launch Lives, you can attend the class, which also will be open to non-members of the center.

The UT community is invited to Centennial Mall from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Oct. 16 when WXUT FM 88.3 will provide popular music entertainment. Student-run organizations will offer booths featuring carnival-style games. Participants can donate dollars for game tickets, and donations may be made with cash, credit cards and Rocket dollars. Dog-petting will return to this year’s Day of Giving Centennial Mall event, and for a $1 donation you can pet a pup. Foodies can get their fill by visiting three food trucks that will be on the scene: Koral Hamburg, The Leaf and Seed, and Holey Toledough Handcrafted Doughnuts.

On Health Science Campus, giving stations will be located in the Collier Building and the Four Seasons Bistro inside UT Medical Center. The College of Nursing will host activities, as well.

Click here for a full list of Day of Giving events.

Gifts to rocketforward.utoledo.edu during the Day of Giving can be designated to specific funds that support causes donors are passionate about, and there are more than 2,000 funds to support.

Support UT Oct. 16 and 17 during its Day of Giving, Rocket Forward: You Launch Lives fundraising campaign, and remember to share messages and encourage others to give using #rocketforward.

New York political pundit to speak Oct. 9

Writer Dan Kaufman will talk about his new book Tuesday, Oct. 9, at 5:30 p.m. in Memorial Field House Room 2100.

Kaufman

He is the author of “The Fall of Wisconsin: The Conservative Conquest of a Progressive Bastion and the Future of American Politics.”

In the book, Kaufman chronicles how the Badger State’s progressive political heritage was overturned in 2010, and Wisconsin went Republican for the first time in three decades in the 2016 presidential election.

“Mr. Kaufman’s book examines the undermining of progressive ideals in the United States over the past 20 years,” Dr. Charles Beatty Medina, UT associate professor of history, said. “It is an important book for understanding current events and politics in the United States and how they are negatively affecting organized labor, education and the environment.

“What we want audiences to take away from the talk is the importance of understanding the current political situation in the United States and how important political participation and knowledge is in American life.”

Kaufman is a contributor to The New York Times and The New Yorker Magazine, and he has appeared on NPR.

The free, public event is sponsored by the departments of History; Political Science and Public Administration; and Sociology and Anthropology; as well as the School of Interdisciplinary Studies and the Program in Law and Social Thought.

UT to premiere advanced screening of PBS series ‘Native America’

The University of Toledo and WGTE will present “Native America: Cities of the Sky,” an advanced screening of the new PBS series to air this fall.

The free, public advanced screening will take place Monday, Oct 8, at 6:30 p.m. in the Driscoll Alumni Center Auditorium.

This “Native America” promotional photo from Providence Pictures shows, clockwise from top left, Alan Hunt preparing to become a Kwakwaka’wakw Hereditary Chief; Potlatch cedar carving; Onondaga tribal member Angela Ferguson; and Comanche tribal members Philip Bread and Jhane Myers.

The premise of the new series is to weave history and science with living Indigenous traditions, bringing to life a land of massive cities connected by social networks spanning two continents.

“Native America” is narrated by Robbie Robertson, Mohawk and member of the rock group The Band. Each hour of the series will explore Great Nations and reveal cities, sacred stories and history hidden in plain sight.

Dr. Melissa Baltus, an archeologist and UT assistant professor of anthropology, is excited about the series.

“‘Cities of the Sky’ considers the organization and architecture of ancient cities like Cahokia, where I do my research, as well as Teotihuacan in Mexico, Uxmal in the Yucatan, and Cuzco in Peru, as they relate to cosmologies and movements of celestial bodies,” Baltus said. “The series partners archaeology and Indigenous knowledge to understanding the past and present peoples of Native America.”

She added that people would be interested to hear about the similarities and differences in ancient cities in the Americas, as well as the engineering and astronomical achievements of past peoples.

The producers of the show were given access to Native American communities, going behind the scenes at special events, including a pilgrimage to ancestral ruins at Chaco Canyon in New Mexico.

The show will premiere on PBS Tuesday, Oct. 23, at 9 p.m. Eastern Time.