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Glacity Theatre Collective to present world premiere of ‘Falling Short’

It’s Feb. 1, 2003. Space Shuttle Columbia has just disintegrated upon re-entry. What kind of person would see this horrible disaster as an opportunity?

Meet Ed and Tony. On a quest for Shuttle parts — as souvenirs or possibly to sell on eBay — the two men journey through the Piney Woods of east Texas, arguing conspiracy theories, ridiculing Nazis, dissing English literature, confessing peculiar secrets, and contemplating their own failed existence.

Texas playwright Wolfgang Paetzel vividly remembers that day: “The Columbia disaster happened right over my house. I should have noticed the loud booms and rattling of windows, but I was too preoccupied chasing a screaming toddler. At that moment, in my own little universe, a poopy diaper was more pressing. ‘Falling Short’ features many folks in similar situations — but only one poopy diaper.”

In this multimedia piece, Ed and Tony will be played live by Drew Wheeler and Dr. Edmund B. Lingan, UT associate professor and chair of theatre and film, as they interact with video segments incorporating actors from both Texas and Ohio.

“East Texas has a distinct natural environment that is different from the rest of Texas,” said Lingan, who, like Paetzel, grew up in that area. “Wolfgang has done an amazing job of capturing the look and the language of the region, and he has really caught the essence of the people we grew up with.”

The production is directed by Lingan, with video segments created by Paetzel and UT alumna Megan Aherne, and set and lighting design by James S. Hill, UT professor emeritus of theatre.

The soundtrack showcases music from obscure Texas garage bands as well as Lone Star legends, including The Blanks, Texas Belairs, Ran, Homer Henderson, Sled, Culturcide, Roy Bennett, and The Peenbeets.

“Falling Short” will run Thursday through Saturday, July 20-22, in the UT Center for Performing Arts Center Theatre. All performances will be at 8 p.m. The doors will open one half hour prior to curtain.

Tickets are $15 at the door or in advance online here. Student tickets are $10 with a valid ID and are available only at the door.

For more information, go to glacity.org.

2017 report for Ohio’s Harmful Algal Bloom Research Initiative highlights UT water quality research

Ohio Sea Grant released today its 2017 update on the statewide Harmful Algal Bloom Research Initiative documenting two years of progress seeking solutions for harmful algal blooms in Lake Erie.

The University of Toledo, situated on the western basin of Lake Erie, is one of the lead universities in the initiative, which consists of 10 Ohio universities and five state agencies and is funded by the Ohio Department of Higher Education and matching funds from participating universities.

The city of Toledo’s water intake is regularly monitored by UT researchers and students during the summer algal bloom season to check for toxins.

The 54-page report features a variety of important research activity underway by members of the UT Water Task Force to protect the public water supply and public health, including:

• Early warning system for toxic algae in Lake Erie’s Maumee Bay by Dr. Tom Bridgeman, professor in the UT Department of Environmental Sciences, and Dr. Ricky Becker, associate professor in the UT Department of Environmental Sciences;

• Developing methods to help water treatment plant operators make decisions on lake water pumping rates according to time of day and weather conditions in order to reduce exposure to algal toxins at the Lake Erie water intake, also by Bridgeman and Becker;

• Transport and fate of cyanotoxins in drinking water distribution systems, such as pipes and storage tanks, by Dr. Youngwoo Seo, associate professor in the UT Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering;

• Investigating alternative biological filtration for algal toxin removal in water treatment through better understanding of microcystin-degrading bacteria, also by Seo;

• Examining the influence of potassium permanganate treatment on algal cell integrity and toxin degradation, also by Seo;

• Developing microcystin-detoxifying water biofilters to upgrade water treatment filters with friendly bacteria through the discovery of enzymes and pathways responsible for microcystin degradation by Dr. Jason Huntley, associate professor in the UT Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology;

• Studying the accuracy of ELISA, the standard test measuring harmful algal toxins, in comparison to a more time-consuming but reliable method, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry by Dr. Dragan Isailovic, associate professor in the UT Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry;

• Developing lab tests for detecting microcystin exposure through biological samples and measuring how much remains inside the body, also by Isailovic;

• Evaluating the ability of commercially available home purification systems to remove algal toxins from tap water by Dr. Glenn Lipscomb, professor and chair of the UT Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering;

• Reconsidering recommended healthy exposure limits by studying the impact of algal toxins in experimental models of pre-existing liver disease by Dr. David Kennedy and Dr. Steven Haller, assistant professors in the UT Division of Cardiovascular Medicine;

• Studying health effects of recreational and work exposure to harmful algal blooms through fishing, swimming or boating by Dr. April Ames and Dr. Michael Valigosky, assistant professors in the UT School of Population Health; and

• Creating an online database to help inform the public about harmful algal blooms in Lake Erie by Dr. Patrick Lawrence, UT geography professor and associate dean of the College of Arts and Letters.

Ohio Sea Grant, which manages the statewide Harmful Algal Bloom Research Initiative, is soliciting proposals for a third round of funding to continue the efforts underway to address toxic algae in Ohio’s Great Lake.

Participating universities include UT, Ohio State University, Bowling Green State University, Central State University, Defiance College, Heidelberg University, Kent State University, Sinclair Community College, the University of Akron and the University of Cincinnati. UT and OSU serve as leaders of the university consortium.

To view the full report, go to http://ohioseagrant.osu.edu/p/ib57m/view.

For Ohio Sea Grant’s news release, go to http://ohioseagrant.osu.edu/news/2017/gz884/habri-report-year-2.

The UT Water Task Force, which is comprised of faculty and researchers in diverse fields spanning the University, serves as a resource for government officials and the public looking for expertise on investigating the causes and effects of algal blooms, the health of Lake Erie, and the health of the communities depending on its water. The task force includes experts in economics; engineering; environmental sciences; business; pharmacy; law; chemistry and biochemistry; geography and planning; and medical microbiology and immunology.

Water quality is a major research focus at UT. With $12.5 million in active grants underway, UT experts are studying algal blooms, invasive species such as Asian carp, and pollutants. Researchers are looking for pathways to restore our greatest natural resource for future generations to ensure communities continue to have access to safe drinking water.

Researchers and students help to protect the public drinking water supply for the greater Toledo area throughout summer algal bloom season by conducting water sampling to alert water treatment plant operators of any toxins heading toward the water intake. UT’s 28-foot research vessel and early warning buoy enable UT to partner with the city of Toledo and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to monitor the health of Lake Erie and provide real-time data.

Walk this way: Discover downtown tours scheduled this summer

Grab comfortable shoes and step it up at lunch: Check out the new places featured in this summer’s 33rd annual Discover Downtown Toledo Walking Tours.

The free, public tours will be held rain or shine every Thursday from July 6 through Aug. 24 from noon to 1 p.m.

One of this summer’s new Discover Downtown Toledo Walking Tours is the Middlegrounds Metropark. Be there Thursday, July 27, to learn about the 28-acre urban green space that features a 1.5-mile path along the Maumee River.

Sponsored by the The University of Toledo Jack Ford Urban Affairs Center and the Toledo-Lucas County Public Library, the tours will be:

• July 6 — Fifth Third Building. See the view from Toledo’s tallest skyscraper. Meet in the lobby of One Seagate on Summit Street. Photo ID required for access to upper floors.

• July 13 — The Oliver House, 27 Broadway St. Built in 1859, this is the Glass City’s oldest commercial structure in continual use. Learn how the building has been adapted over the years. Meet in the parking lot.

• July 20 — Adams Street and Uptown. Walk along Adams Street from 10th Street to 18th Street. Meet on the Toledo-Lucas County Public Library’s north lawn at Adams and Michigan streets.

• July 27 — Middlegrounds Metropark. See spectacular views of the city from Toledo’s newest park. Meet in the main parking lot, 111 Ottawa St.

• Aug. 3 — Westmoreland Historic Neighborhood. Experience one of Toledo’s most elegant early 20th-century neighborhoods; it is a local and national historic district. Meet on the center island at Mt Vernon and Grand avenues.

• Aug. 10 — Collingwood Arts Center. One of the earliest homes of the Old West End grew into a religious complex and then into one of the city’s premier arts centers. Meet at 2413 Blvd. Parking available at center.

• Aug. 17 — Royal Hotel. The new owners will discuss their restoration plans for the building. Meet in front of 337 Broadway St.

Check out the homes in Westmoreland, which was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1986. Even if it’s not a beautiful Thursday, Aug. 3, bring an umbrella for the free walking tour.

• Aug. 24 — Old Orchard Neighborhood. Discover how this area got its name, and learn about its streets, architecture and early residents. Meet at Kenwood Boulevard and Pemberton Drive; park near Kenwood.

“We wanted to expand our offerings and explore other popular areas of Toledo this summer,” said Dr. Neil Reid, UT professor of geography and director of the Jack Ford Urban Affairs Center. “The Middlegrounds Metropark, Royal Hotel, Collingwood Arts Center, and the Old Orchard and Westmoreland neighborhoods are new tours.”

He added the tours are led by guides who are passionate about the city and trained in Toledo history and architecture.

Participants will receive a copy of the award-winning “Discover Downtown Toledo Walking Tour Guidebook.”

For more information, call the Toledo-Lucas County Public Library Local History and Genealogy Department at 419.259.5233.

Fellows selected for new conference leadership initiative

Three UT faculty members have been named fellows to participate in the new Mid-American Conference Academic Leadership Development Program.

The program was created to foster preparation and advancement of future academic leaders through working with MAC administrators and colleagues.

Dr. Andrew Hsu, provost and executive vice president for academic affairs, said, “The University of Toledo is excited to join the Mid-American Conference Academic Leadership Development Program, and we are happy to announce the fellows from our institution who will benefit from this tremendous opportunity.”

Fellows for the 2017-18 academic year are:

• Dr. Patrick Lawrence, professor of geography and planning, and associate dean of social and behavioral sciences in the College of Arts and Letters;

• Holly Monsos, professor of theatre and associate dean of the School of Visual and Performing Arts in the College of Arts and Letters; and

• Dr. Amy Thompson, professor of public health in the School of Population Health in the College of Health and Human Services; faculty fellow in the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs; and 2017-18 president of Faculty Senate.

All tenured faculty with experience in administrative leadership and service were eligible to apply for the MAC Academic Leadership Development Program. Candidates needed to submit a letter of support from their dean, as well as an application and curriculum vitae for consideration.

“Our fellows will participate in a development program with UT leaders to gain valuable insight and experience,” Hsu said. “In addition, they will work with MAC school administrators and peers to better understand how universities operate.”

All MAC Academic Leadership Development Program fellows will attend one three-day workshop each semester. Topics to be addressed include conflict resolution, budgeting, accreditation and accountability.

“Thanks to this program, our fellows will see firsthand the challenges and rewards of institutional service as they prepare for potential leadership positions,” Hsu said.

Read more about the MAC Academic Leadership Development Program at utoledo.edu/offices/provost/MAC-ALDP.html.

Golf outing to raise funds for geography scholarship to honor late UT grad student

If Michael Moore wasn’t working on his dissertation or sampling craft beer, he was on the golf course.

“Mike enjoyed playing golf,” said Dr. Neil Reid, professor of geography and planning, and director of the Jack Ford Urban Affairs Center. “He also enjoyed debating varieties of hops and India pale ales as much and as easily as he dove into complex statistical analyses of the industry.”

Moore

Moore died from an aortic aneurysm April 8, 2015, while having a beer at a local pub. The doctoral student in the UT Department of Geography and Planning was 34.

To honor his memory, the Geography and Planning Department has established the Michael Moore Memorial Student Scholarship Fund.

“This fund will allow us to award scholarships to academically qualified students pursuing a bachelor of arts degree in geography who demonstrate financial need,” said Dr. Dan Hammel, professor and chair of geography and planning. “It also allows us to remember a fine student who became a respected colleague.”

For his dissertation, Moore was studying the spatial dynamics of the American craft beer industry. He posthumously received his PhD from the University.

“The craft brewing industry is growing so fast and changing the whole brewing landscape,” Reid said. “Mike analyzed where it’s growing and why. He was well on his way to being a really successful academic.”

A native of Swanton, Ohio, Moore received a certificate in geographic information sciences and applied geographics from UT in 2012.

To raise funds, the Michael Moore Memorial Scholarship Golf Outing will be held Saturday, June 17, from 1 to 9 p.m. at White Pines Golf Course, 1640 County Road 2, Swanton.

The cost is $75 for an individual golfer or $300 for a foursome and covers 18 holes, golf cart and dinner. There also are hole signage sponsorship opportunities available for $125. A dinner-only option costs $50.

To register, go to give2ut.utoledo.edu/mooregolf.asp.

To donate to the Michael Moore Memorial Student Scholarship Fund, go to give2ut.utoledo.edu/mikemoore.asp.

For more information about the event or fund, contact Heather Slough, director of annual giving in the Division of Advancement, at heather.slough@utoledo.edu or 419.530.8495.

UT offers summer music workshops

The University of Toledo Department of Music will host several summer music workshops.

Workshops are available in jazz, flute, voice, and choral conducting and teaching, with tracks available for multiple ages and skill levels.

All the workshops listed below will be held in the Center for Performing Arts.

UT Summer Jazz Institute — June 11-16
Deadline to Register: June 1

The UT Summer Jazz Institute is the place where all levels of jazz students from beginning through professional can discover and achieve their jazz potential through the study of jazz in one of four programs: instrumental jazz, vocal jazz, teacher training and jazz appreciation. The curriculum is designed to provide introductory, fundamental, intermediate and advanced jazz experiences for interested students from middle school through high school, undergraduate and graduate college students. There also is a pedagogy track for educators desiring to refine and develop their teaching skills. A track for those who want to grow in their appreciation of jazz also is available.

The institute provides a learning environment through lectures, master classes, jam sessions, performances and a recording experience. Participants immerse themselves in improvisation, performance, arranging, and pedagogy with established professional jazz musician/educators. Tuition is $500 ($50 application fee, $450 camp fee). Register online at summerjazz.utoledo.edu. Deadline to register is June 1; all fees due by June 9.

Flute Camp — June 19-23
Deadline to Register: June 12

The UT Flute Camp is taught by musicians Joel Tse, principal flute for the Toledo Symphony Orchestra and UT flute instructor, and Amy Heritage, second flute with the Toledo Symphony Orchestra and Suzuki flute instructor. It is suitable for elementary age students through adults.
Special guests will present on instrument care, yoga and breathing, music and movement, and more. These extras are included in the track fees. A free, public concert performed by students will conclude the workshop on Friday, June 23, at 4 p.m.

There are two tracks to choose from:

Track 1 is for students who have been playing for one to three years. It runs from 9 a.m. to noon and is taught by Heritage. The cost for Track 1 is $150. Fees are due by the first day of the workshop.

Track 2 is for intermediate and advanced students and will run from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. This track is taught by Tse and Heritage. Track 2 is $300. Fees are due by the first day of the workshop.

Can’t attend all week? Sign up by the day. The cost is $65 per day for any track if attending less than the full week. Scholarships also are available to help cover fees; apply when you register.

To register or for more information, visit utoledo.edu/al/svpa/music/communitymusic/flutecamp.html.

Janus Vocal Arts Workshops — July 5-14
Deadline to Register: June 7

The Janus Vocal Arts Workshops offer professional development seminars and workshops in voice. In addition to the Emerging Artist track that studies and performs an opera, there is a High School Student track (July 10-14) which focuses on vocal technique and musical theatre. The two seminars — “Mind, Body, Voice” (July 7-8) and “Music as a Business” (July 12-13) — can be taken separately or together at a discount.

Registration, cost and discount information available online at utoledo.edu/al/svpa/music/communitymusic/janusvocalarts

Choral Conducting and Teaching Workshop — July 25-27
Deadline to Register July 1

This comprehensive and immersive choral conducting workshop is intended to serve and educate individuals as conductor, teacher, leader, scholar, performer and servant. Conductors will engage in sessions covering a wide variety of topics. This year’s workshop will allow conductors to choose from either a three-day immersion workshop or a one-day workshop. Teachers: This workshop will provide up to 18 contact hours of professional development.

There will be a limit of 15 spaces so that each conductor is allowed sufficient podium/conducting time. Coffee and a light breakfast will be provided in the morning. The three-day workshop is $300 if registered by July 1; $325 if registered after July 1. The one-day workshop is $100 if registered by July 1; $125 if registered after July 1. All sessions will be from from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., with a break for lunch (not provided).

Registration and information available are online at
utoledo.edu/al/svpa/music/communitymusic/summerchoral/choralworkshops.html.

Department of Art to present two workshops June 5-9

The UT Department of Art will offer two summer workshops for students ages 9 through high school. From Monday through Friday, June 5-9, Manga/Anime will be held in the morning, and Wizard School will take place in the afternoon. 

In the morning workshop, students will explore manga and anime design techniques across a range of media — hand-painted shoes, digital design, hats and more. Participants should bring a pair of new, white canvas tennis shoes; all other materials are provided.

Students in the Manga/Anime workshop will create hand-painted tennis shoes.

When students graduate from Wizard School, they’ll be equipped to unleash their creative inner wizard. Participants will make a wand; design a wizardry crest; concoct potion bottles; build a dark forest terrarium; create a plush creature; and develop and play wizard games. All materials will be provided.

Alissa Cox, an independent artist since 2006, will present the workshops.

Coming from a family of artisans and artists, Cox grew up learning woodcrafts, stained glass, blacksmithing, jewelry craft, quilting and painting. She moved her business, Smoky Grove, to Ohio in 2012 and has exhibited at Columbus Winterfair, the Great Lakes Jazz Festival and the Black Swamp Arts Festival. Cox has taught several workshops in pyrography, sewing and painting.

The cost is $60 per workshop or $105 to take both workshops.

Both workshops will be held in the Center for the Visual Arts on the University’s Toledo Museum of Art Campus.

To register, go to utoledo.edu/al/svpa/art/webforms/summerartworkshopsregform.html

New dean selected to lead College of Arts and Letters

An award-winning independent documentary filmmaker and scholar of women’s and gender studies will join The University of Toledo to lead the College of Arts and Letters.

She also is a familiar face on campus.

Gilbert

Charlene Gilbert will return to UT from Ohio State University at Lima, where she has served as dean and director since 2014, as well as professor in the departments of Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies. Her appointment will be effective July 10.

Prior to Lima, Gilbert worked at UT for seven years as professor and chair of the Department of Women’s and Gender Studies, founding director of the School of Interdisciplinary Studies, and director of the Catharine S. Eberly Center for Women.

“The University is excited to welcome Charlene Gilbert back to Toledo,” Dr. Andrew Hsu, provost and executive vice president for academic affairs, said. “Her excellent, diverse experience and enthusiasm for student and faculty success will be strong assets as dean of the College of Arts and Letters.”

“I am honored to have been selected as the next dean of the College of Arts and Letters,” Gilbert said. “This is an inspiring time for The University of Toledo, and it is clear to me that the College of Arts and Letters will be a critical part of the University’s highest aspirations for the future.”

Gilbert was a documentary filmmaker and professor at American University in Washington, D.C., from 2001 to 2007 in the School of Communication.

Her documentary films have been screened nationally on PBS and in film festivals across the country. Some of her best-known works include “Homecoming: Sometimes I Am Haunted by Memories of Red Dirt and Clay,” about African-American farmers and their struggle after the Civil War to own and farm land in the rural South, and “Children Will Listen,” which is about elementary school children planning and performing a junior production of Stephen Sondheim’s “Into the Woods” for the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C.

Her current projects include an experimental documentary on the international prototype for the kilogram and a documentary on Mary Fields, a female pioneer known as “Stagecoach Mary” who has ties to Toledo.

Gilbert is a past recipient of Harvard University’s Radcliffe Fellowship, the Rockefeller Media Arts Fellowship and the American Council on Education Fellowship.

She has a bachelor’s degree in economics and political science from Yale University and a master of fine arts in film and media arts from Temple University.

“The College of Arts and Letters has an incredibly talented community of faculty, staff and students,” Gilbert said. “I am looking forward to joining this community and building on the strong legacy of excellence that can be found in all of the departments and schools within the college.”

Once Gilbert’s appointment begins at UT, Dr. Jamie Barlowe will join the Provost’s Office full time as interim vice provost for faculty affairs.

Glacity Theatre Collective to explore artificial intelligence

It’s the age of artificial intelligence, and 85-year-old Marjorie — a jumble of disparate, fading memories — has a handsome new companion who’s programmed to feed the story of her life back to her.

The Glacity Theatre Collective will present “Marjorie Prime” Friday through Sunday, May 12-14, in the Center for Performing Arts Studio Theatre.

Mark Owen and Jennifer Nagy Lake rehearsed a scene from the Glacity Theatre Collective’s production of “Marjorie Prime” with Barbara Barkan in the background.

Curtain time is 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and 2 p.m. Sunday.

Barbara Barkan will play Marjorie, and Tanner DuVall will be her friend in Jordan Harrison’s Pulitzer-nominated work that explores memory and identity, love and loss, and the limits — if any — of what technology can replace.

Jennifer Nagy Lake, former UT theatre student, and Mark Owen also are in the cast.

Jeffrey J. Albright, former UT theatre student, is directing the production.

James S. Hill, UT professor emeritus of theatre, is the scene designer for the play. Holly Monsos, associate dean of the School of Visual and Performing Arts in the College of Arts and Letters, professor of theatre, and executive director of the Glacity Theatre Collective, designed the costumes.

Tickets are $15 at the door or in advance online at glacity.tix.org. Student tickets are $10 with a valid ID and are available only at the door.

For more information, go to glacity.org.

Study shows UT has $3.3 billion economic impact on community

The University of Toledo’s impact to the region’s economy totals $3.3 billion, according to a comprehensive study by UT economists.

That is equivalent to 9.7 percent of the region’s gross metropolitan area product.

“As the second largest employer in northwest Ohio with an enrollment of more than 20,000 students, we are proud to be one of Toledo’s anchor institutions contributing as a major force to the region’s growth and development,” UT President Sharon L. Gaber said. “The University of Toledo continues to work hard to strengthen the community.”

Dr. Oleg Smirnov, associate professor of economics, and Dr. Olugbenga Ajilore, associate professor of economics, completed the analysis this academic year.

“We show the short-term and cumulative, lasting contributions the institution makes to the region,” Smirnov said. “If the University had not been opened in Toledo 145 years ago, these impacts would not exist.”

The UT economists not only charted University, student and employee spending over the 2015-16 academic year and its ripple effect, they also calculated the long-term value of the educated workforce of UT alumni and faculty living in the area.

Of the $3.3 billion, $1.98 billion in economic growth and competitiveness is contributed by UT faculty and alumni who live in the region. Thirty-three percent of UT alumni have remained in the Toledo area after graduating.

UT is the top-ranked institution in the region for social mobility and second in Ohio. UT also ranks among the highest compared to other Ohio public research universities for income mobility.

“UT provides a path to success and professional opportunity for underrepresented and economically disadvantaged students who wouldn’t otherwise be able to access higher education,” Ajilore said. “Because of this University, they are thriving. Plus, many of them stay in the region and impact the economy once they graduate.”

Of the $3.3 billion in total economic impact, $1.35 billion goes from UT to the Toledo area through payroll, local purchases for day-to-day operations, and expenditures by students and visitors at local businesses. That includes direct impacts of $769 million, which lead to an additional $582 million in indirect and induced effects.

The study finds that for every job at UT, the local economy gains 2.6 full-time equivalent jobs.

According to the study, UT directly generates more than 5,000 full-time jobs, and economic activity by the University leads to the creation of over 8,000 additional direct and indirect jobs. A total of 13,498 jobs were created directly or indirectly because of UT’s presence.

UT’s 20,381 students and visitors to the campus contributed an estimated $340 million to the Toledo area economy in fiscal year 2015-16, according to the report.

Plus, Smirnov and Ajilore looked at state impact. They found that for every $1 invested by the state into UT, $10 of economic impact is generated to the local economy. University operations and associated economic activity contributed $44.4 million in state and local taxes.

“When it comes to supporting higher education, every dollar counts, and any change is felt widespread,” Smirnov said.

To read the full report, go to utoledo.edu/economic-impact.