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University plans events for Sexual Assault Awareness Month

“Start by Believing” will kick off The University of Toledo’s Sexual Assault Awareness Month.

The public awareness campaign was created by End Violence Against Women International, a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving criminal justice responses to sexual assault.

The UToledo Center for Student Advocacy and Wellness will have “Start by Believing” information tables set up Tuesday, March 26, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Four Seasons Bistro on Health Science Campus and in the Thompson Student Union Trimble Lounge on Main Campus.

“It’s important to change the way we respond to sexual assaults,” said Dr. Kasey Tucker-Gail, director of the Center for Student Advocacy and Wellness, and associate professor in the School of Justice. “Knowing how to respond is critical; when victims are believed and not questioned with ‘why,’ they can feel safe, supported, and start on a path to healing.”

Events planned throughout April for Sexual Assault Awareness Month include:

The Clothesline Project will return to the University during Sexual Assault Awareness Month. Shirts will be on display on Health Science Campus Wednesday, April 3, and on Main Campus Thursday, April 11.

Wednesday, April 3 — The Clothesline Project, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Four Seasons Bistro and the Health Education Building Lobby on Health Science Campus. This event is a way for those affected by sexual violence to express their emotions through writings and drawings on symbolic T-shirts. The shirts are hung on a clothesline to be viewed by others as testimony to the issue of sexual violence.

— One Love Workshop with Rockets Against Sexual Assault, 5 to 7 p.m., International House. One Love is a national leader in educating young people about healthy and unhealthy relationships. This program for UToledo students will focus on signs of escalation in a relationship, how to help a friend, and how to spot red flags of an unhealthy relationship.

• Tuesday, April 9 — T-shirt making for the Clothesline Project, noon to 4 p.m., Health and Human Services Building Room 3005. Anyone who has been affected by violence is welcome to make a T-shirt to honor a loved one or herself/himself; all supplies will be provided.

Thursday, April 11 — The Clothesline Project, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Centennial Mall (rain location Thompson Student Union).

Thursday, April 18 — One Love Workshop with Rockets Against Sexual Assault, 5 to 7 p.m., Health and Human Services Building Room 1711.

Wednesday, April 24 — Denim Day. Students, faculty and staff are encouraged to wear jeans to raise awareness of sexual violence.

— Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network (RAINN) Day, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Centennial Mall (rain location: Thompson Student Union). RAINN Day is held to raise awareness and educate students about sexual violence on college campuses. Umbrellas are decorated with positive messages in support of sexual assault survivors. RAINN is the nation’s largest anti-sexual violence organization.

For more information on these events, call the Center for Student Advocacy and Wellness at 419.530.2497.

UToledo alumna to share inspirational story March 26

Diana Patton will return to The University of Toledo Tuesday, March 26, to talk about overcoming abuse and persevering to become an attorney.

She will speak at 7 p.m. in Thompson Student Union Room 3020.

“We are honored to have Diana Patton visit campus to share her moving and motivational story,” David Young, UToledo director of Toledo Excel and Special projects, said.

Patton is the author of “Inspiration in My Shoes,” a 2016 memoir that chronicles overcoming abuse, racism and heartache. In the 236-page book she wrote with Amanda Filippelli, Patton explains inspiration is everywhere; turmoil doesn’t define you; and faith and determination can help through anything.

The CEO of Diana R. Patton Consulting LLC is an attorney who speaks on leadership, emotional intelligence, diversity, inclusion and equity, as well as trauma-informed care. She is a mentor on self-care, and social and emotional intelligence.

Patton served as the vice president, chief operating officer and general counsel for the Toledo Fair Housing Center, and she worked at CedarCreek Church. In addition, the graduate of the Institute of Integrative Nutrition in New York also co-owned a health-based company, FITatudes LLC.

She serves on the UToledo College of Health and Human Services’ board and the UToledo Paralegal advisory board.

Patton received bachelor’s and law degrees from UToledo and was a member of the track team.

Her visit is part of the Office of Multicultural Student Success’ African-American Intitiatives Through Your Eyes Series.

The first 20 women at the event will receive a free signed copy of “Inspiration in My Shoes.”

For more information on the free event, contact Young at david.young@utoledo.edu.

Stalking victim to share story at March 11 lecture

Anna Nasset will discuss “Stand Up to Stalking and Sexual Violence” Monday, March 11, at 6 p.m. in Health and Human Services Building Room 1711.

She will share her personal account of being stalked by a stranger for more than seven years, and how advocacy for stalking victims is important for recovery.

Her free talk will be followed by a question-and-answer session. The event is sponsored by The University of Toledo Center for Student Advocacy and Wellness.

“The Center for Student Advocacy and Wellness would like to bring additional information about the effects of stalking and how advocacy can help victims of stalking to UT’s campus,” said Dr. Kasey Tucker-Gail, associate professor of criminal justice and director of the UT Center for Student Advocacy and Wellness.

For more information about the event, go to the Center for Student Advocacy and Wellness website.

If you are experiencing a stalking or sexual misconduct concern, help is available: Contact the Center for Student Advocacy and Wellness at 419.530.3431.

UT to develop training tool to better care for patients who are homeless

The University of Toledo is developing a virtual reality training to improve Ohio Medicaid providers’ cultural competency and reduce implicit bias as a way to better understand the patients they serve. The virtual reality training focuses on the barriers to health care faced by those without stable, permanent housing.

UT faculty from the College of Medicine and Life Sciences and the College of Health and Human Services will conduct interviews and observe interactions in an area homeless shelter to build a realistic portrait of the health-care struggles experienced by individuals who depend on urban homeless shelters for their housing.

A multidisciplinary team from UT is building a virtual reality training program to help Ohio Medicaid providers better treat patients without stable, permanent housing. The investigators are, from left, Dr. Thomas Papadimos, medical director and associate dean for immersive and simulation-based learning; Dr. Shipra Singh, assistant professor of health education and public health; Dr. Lance Dworkin, professor and chair of medicine; and Dr. Scott Pappada, assistant professor of anesthesiology and bioengineering.

From that data, faculty and staff from the College of Medicine and Life Sciences, the School of Population Health in the College of Health and Human Services, and the Jacobs Interprofessional Immersive Simulation Center will create an interactive experience that will electronically place clinicians into a model homeless shelter as fly-on-the-wall observers.

“There’s a lot of attention nowadays to how one’s background and social structure impact not only their health, but also how successful they are in using the health-care system,” said Dr. Lance Dworkin, professor and chair of the UT Department of Medicine, and the primary investigator for the project. “If we understand that, we can integrate that knowledge into the care we provide so it’s more effective.”

The University also is building a robust evaluation component into the program that will monitor physical biomarkers such as heart rate, blood pressure and respiratory rate while participants are engaged in the simulation. Using assessment software developed by Dr. Scott Pappada, UT assistant professor of anesthesiology and bioengineering, and a co-investigator on the project, researchers will collect data before and after the simulation to learn how the program affects clinicians and whether it helps them connect with individuals who are marginalized by society.

The project is funded by a $1.24 million grant from the Ohio Department of Medicaid.

UT’s work is part of a larger partnership between the Ohio Department of Medicaid and Ohio’s medical schools, administered by the Ohio Colleges of Medicine Government Resource Center. Like many projects managed by the center, the Medicaid equity simulation project is aimed at reducing health disparities, addressing the social determinants of health, and improving patient care and health outcomes for Ohio’s Medicaid population.

During the course of the homeless shelter simulation, health-care providers will see rudimentary sleeping quarters, dining and social areas, observe the interactions between guests and staff, and listen in on conversations gleaned from the real-life interviews.

“The big message here is how does one change clinical decision making based on what is learned about an individual in this environment,” said Dr. Shipra Singh, UT assistant professor of health education and public health, and a co-investigator on the project.

Singh, who is directing the scripts that will be used in the simulation, said those changes could be as simple as not forcing someone who has no access to reliable transportation to go to the back of the line if they’re late for an appointment, or understanding that immediate lifestyle changes may not be possible.

“You need to listen to the patient rather than just look at them and understand the cultural context they’re coming from and what really matters to them,” Singh said.

The program is expected to be ready to launch to Ohio Medicaid providers within The University of Toledo Medical Center in May and disseminated throughout the community by June.

Health Science Campus Artist Showcase to open Feb. 18

The 14th annual Health Science Campus Artist Showcase will take place from Monday, Feb. 18, through Wednesday, April 10, on the fourth floor of Mulford Library.

This year’s exhibit features work from more than 30 artists who are students, faculty and staff in the health sciences from Health Science and Main campuses, as well as UT Medical Center.

On exhibit will be a variety of 2-D and 3-D artwork, including paintings, drawings, photography, sculpture and mixed media.

An artist reception will be held Friday, Feb. 22, from 4 to 6 p.m. on the fourth floor of Mulford Library.

Dr. Paul Brand, UT associate professor emeritus of physiology and pharmacology, will speak at 4:30 p.m. at the reception. His talk is titled “Create Your Own World.”

“I paint and draw first for the simple pleasure of putting color on paper, and then to create paintings that stand out because they fuse realistic images and strong abstract designs,” Brand said.

A longstanding participant in the Health Science Campus Artist Showcase, Brand paints diverse subjects, most often landscapes, but also still-life and abstracts, using watercolors, acrylics, pastels or charcoal. He has four works in this year’s exhibit.

“I love watercolors for their luminous, fresh appearance, acrylics for their immediacy and simplicity, pastels for their intense colors and ease of application, and charcoal for the range of values and richness,” he said.

For the past two decades, paintings by the award-winning artist have been featured at several juried shows. In addition, Brand has taught art classes at the Toledo Botanical Gardens, Toledo Museum of Art and Art Supply Depo.

Like the exhibit, the reception and lecture are free and open to the public. Visitors can view the artwork during regular library hours: Monday through Thursday from 7:30 a.m. to midnight; Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Saturday from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.; and Sunday from 9 a.m. to midnight.

For more information, visit the University Libraries website or contact Jodi Jameson, assistant professor and nursing librarian at Mulford Library, and member of the artist showcase committee, at 419.383.5152 or jodi.jameson@utoledo.edu.

Criminal Justice and Legal Specialties Career Fair Feb. 14

Representatives from nearly 100 employers, including local, state and federal government, law enforcement agencies and private law firms, will be on The University of Toledo campus Thursday, Feb. 14, for the annual Criminal Justice and Legal Specialties Career Fair.

The event will take place from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. in the Thompson Student Union Auditorium. Graduate and undergraduate students of all majors and programs are invited to attend.

Among the employers recruiting full-time employees or interns are the Toledo Police Department, the U.S. Secret Service, Legal Aid of Western Ohio Inc., Marshall & Melhorn LLC and Marathon Petroleum.

“This is an excellent opportunity for students to see the possibilities available after graduation, as well as what internships are available at these agencies,” said Dr. Wendi Goodlin-Fahncke, associate professor of criminal justice in the UT College of Health and Human Services.

Attendees are asked to dress professionally and bring their resumés.

No advanced registration is necessary, though students will be asked to check in on arrival.

Research integrity officer named

Dr. Debra Boardley, professor in the School of Population Health, has been appointed as the research integrity officer for The University of Toledo.

Boardley has experience in research integrity issues, having served as a member of the University Research Council and as a member of both research misconduct inquiry and investigation committees.

Boardley

She is an expert in food and nutrition behavior, and is particularly concerned about local food issues, including nutrition needs of older adults, children and women.

A registered and licensed dietitian, Boardley holds a master of health science degree from Washington University in St. Louis and a PhD from the University of South Carolina.

Boardley will take over duties from Dr. Wayne Hoss, who came back after retiring from his position as associate dean in the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, to serve the University on an interim basis as the research integrity officer. Hoss will still see cases started under his watch through conclusion, with a transition of new cases to Boardley.

“I am pleased that Dr. Boardley is willing to bring her talent and energy to a demanding position at the University that is so important to maintaining our commitment to integrity in research and scholarship,” Dr. Frank Calzonetti, UT vice president for research, said.

Calzonetti thanked Hoss for his service, which included helping to draft a new research misconduct policy.

UPDATED: Stalking lecture rescheduled

One in six women and one in 19 men will experience stalking in their lifetimes. As part of National Stalking Awareness Month, the UT Center for Student Advocacy and Wellness will hold a lecture and question-and-answer session with Anna Nasset.

Nasset

“Stand Up to Stalking and Sexual Violence” has been rescheduled from Wednesday, Jan. 30, to Monday, March 11, at 6 p.m. in Health and Human Services Building Room 1711.

Nasset will share her story to increase awareness about these crimes and to support service providers and survivors.

“The Center for Student Advocacy and Wellness would like to bring additional information about the effects of stalking and how advocacy can help victims of stalking to UT’s campus,” said Dr. Kasey Tucker-Gail, associate professor of criminal justice and director of the UT Center for Student Advocacy and Wellness. 

Nasset will discuss her personal account of being stalked by a stranger for more than seven years, and how advocacy for stalking victims is important for recovery.

For more information about the free, public lecture, go to the Center for Student Advocacy and Wellness website.

If you are experiencing a stalking or sexual misconduct concern, help is available: Contact the Center for Student Advocacy and Wellness at 419.530.3431.

New vice provost for faculty affairs appointed

Dr. Amy Thompson started her new job as vice provost for faculty affairs Jan. 1.

Thompson

Thompson served as interim associate vice provost for faculty affairs and professor of public health, and provides oversight for the faculty orientation program, the UT Leadership Institute, and the University’s faculty awards program. In addition, she provides leadership for the new Future of Higher Education forums that are held monthly by the Office of the Provost.

In her new role, Thompson also will be responsible for the administration of faculty personnel processes, policies and procedures; faculty leadership and development programs; and additional faculty success initiatives related to the priorities of the University’s strategic plan.

“Amy joined the Office of the Provost last summer and has provided outstanding leadership for a number of initiatives that strengthen and support faculty success at UT,” Dr. Andrew Hsu, provost and executive vice president for academic affairs, said. “In her new position, she will continue to help faculty members achieve new levels of success.”

Barlowe

Dr. Jamie Barlowe, who serves as interim vice provost for faculty affairs, announced her plans to retire in the new year. Barlowe has been a UT faculty member since 1990 as a professor of English and women’s and gender studies. She also served as dean of the College of Arts and Letters, formerly the College of Languages, Literature and Social Sciences, for six years. During her time at UT, she also has served as an associate dean, department chair and president of Faculty Senate.

“Jamie is a valued member of the Office of the Provost’s leadership team, and her wisdom, experience and knowledge will be greatly missed,” Hsu said. “I am grateful that she will help with the transition during the month of January.”

Thompson has been a member of the UT faculty since 2007 and has served as director of the Center for Health and Successful Living in the College of Health and Human Services. She is the immediate past-president of the University’s Faculty Senate. She was selected to serve as a Fellow in the Mid-American Conference Academic Leadership Development Program in 2017-18, and last year served as a Fellow in UT’s Office of Research and Sponsored Programs. She also served as a Fellow in the Office of the Provost in summer 2018.

Thompson received a PhD in health education and a master of science and education in public health from UT. She received a bachelor of science in public health from Central Michigan University.

Submissions sought for 2019 Health Science Campus Artist Showcase

Mulford Library is seeking submissions for its 2019 Health Science Campus Artist Showcase.

The deadline to apply for consideration to be included in the annual event is 5 p.m. Friday, Jan. 11.

The library is accepting submissions from UT faculty, staff and students in the health sciences — nursing, medicine, pharmacy and the health professions — as well as UT Medical Center employees.

To be considered for the show, digital images of artwork can be sent to hscartshow@utoledo.edu, along with a submission form that can be found with guidelines on University Libraries’ website.

Artists will be notified if their submitted pieces have been accepted no later than Wednesday, Jan. 16, and will receive instructions for bringing in their artwork to the library for the showcase.

The showcase will be on display from Feb. 18 through April 10 on the fourth floor of Mulford Library. In the past, artwork included photography, painting, drawing, sculpture, jewelry making, quilting, multimedia, graphics, wood carving and more.

An opening reception featuring a talk by Dr. Paul H. Brand, associate professor emeritus of physiology and pharmacology, and accomplished artist, will be held Friday, Feb. 22, at 4 p.m. in Mulford Library.

Questions about the showcase can be directed to Jodi Jameson, assistant professor and nursing librarian at Mulford Library, who is a member of the artist showcase committee, at 419.383.5152 or jodi.jameson@utoledo.edu.