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UToledo Medical Center to offer free skin cancer screenings for veterans, employees

As Americans head to backyard barbecues, baseball games and other fun in the sun this summer, it’s crucial to protect your skin from harmful ultraviolet rays.

“Skin cancer is still one of the fastest growing cancers in the United States,” said Dr. Lorie Gottwald, chief of dermatology at The University of Toledo Medical Center. “We need to stress protection all year long, but summer is usually the time we are out and about, and ambient sunlight is indeed a risk factor for skin cancer.”

One in five Americans will develop a form of skin cancer in his or her lifetime, according to the American Dermatological Association, making it the most common form of cancer in the country.

While some types of skin cancer are highly curable, it can be deadly. Melanoma — the most dangerous kind — will lead to an estimated 7,230 deaths in 2019.

On Monday, June 24, from 1 to 4 p.m. the Dermatology Department at UTMC will host a free skin cancer screening event for UToledo employees and all military veterans.

While there is no cost, registration is required by calling 419.383.6315. The screenings will take place at the UTMC Dermatology Clinic in Suite F at the Ruppert Health Center.

“We want to continue to fight the war against skin cancer and also recognize the contributions of our vets,” Gottwald said.

Each screening will take approximately 15 minutes. Participants will receive a sunscreen sample and information on skin cancer awareness.

If UTMC clinicians notice something that may need intervention, they will provide a screening sheet that patients can take to a dermatologist of their choice. No biopsies will be taken during the screening event.

If you are going to be spending time in the sun — even just going for a walk at lunchtime — Gottwald said you should be wearing an approved sunscreen.

“The standard recommendation is SPF 30 or higher, and higher numbers do offer more protection,” she said. “Also, remember to reapply the sunscreen every two hours, especially if you’re sweating.”

Employees can stop at the Dermatology Clinic during regular hours for free sunscreen samples.

UToledo students’ winning biodesign projects to compete in New York

Two groups of UToledo students will compete against more than 30 teams from around the world Thursday and Friday, June 20 and 21, at the Biodesign Challenge Summit at the Parsons School of Design and the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

The two teams, PlastiGrow and btilix, won the chance to travel to the Big Apple at the UToledo competition this spring at the Toledo Museum of Art Glass Pavilion.

Btilix team members are, from left, Tyler Saner, Sarah Mattei, Courtney Kinzel, Timothy Wolf and Sherin Aburidi.

Presented by The University of Toledo, the Biodesign Challenge offers art and design, bioengineering, and environmental sciences students the opportunity to envision future applications of biotechnology and biomaterials that address complex global challenges. Students are connected with community experts to develop innovative solutions through interdisciplinary research and iterative prototyping.

“Normally, our jurors award one team with the honor of competing in New York, but this year we have the opportunity to award not just one team — a team that will compete against all schools — but we are also putting up for consideration another team for a special prize, so we are happy to announce our two winning teams, btilix and PlastiGrow,” Eric Zeigler, assistant professor of art, said.

Students on the PlastiGrow team are, from left, McKenzie Dunwald, Michael Socha, Colin Chalmers and Ysabelle Yrad.

The overall winner of the UToledo competition was btilix. This team developed a disinfectant spray for combatting antibiotic-resistant superbugs. The students on the btilix team are Tyler Saner, art; Sarah Mattei, environmental science; Courtney Kinzel, environmental science; Timothy Wolf, bioengineering; and Sherin Aburidi, bioengineering.

The UToledo team, PlastiGrow, is applying to compete in New York for the ORTA Sustainability in Textiles Prize. The team engineered a biodegradable plastic material that can be used in the creation of everyday products to greatly reduce the cost and energy spent on waste and recycling efforts. Team members are McKenzie Dunwald, art; Michael Socha, bioengineering; Colin Chalmers, art; and Ysabelle Yrad, environmental science.

For more information on the competition, visit the Biodesign Challenge website.

Families invited on cruise to learn how UToledo monitors health of rivers, Lake Erie

Scientists and students at The University of Toledo work tirelessly to study the waters of Lake Erie and its tributaries in the fight against harmful algal blooms and invasive Asian carp. They also evaluate potential for reintroducing historic fish, such as sturgeon.

This summer, families are invited to board the Sandpiper and cruise the Maumee River while learning how researchers at the UToledo Lake Erie Center collect water information.

“The Maumee River may look like just a muddy river, but it’s full of life,” Dr. Thomas Bridgeman, UToledo professor of ecology and director of the UToledo Lake Erie Center, said. “We show kids how sediment and algae affect water clarity, but they also get to see the tiny, shrimp-like animals that are eating the algae and — in turn — feeding the fish that make western Lake Erie the ‘Walleye Capital of the World.’”

The two-hour “Discover the River” cruise starts at 10 a.m. every Saturday through August at the dock at Water Street and Jefferson Avenue near Promenade Park in downtown Toledo.

Admission to the 100-passenger Sandpiper is $19. Children younger than 12 are $11. Purchase tickets in advance on the Sandpiper website.

Annual CampMed program shows area students their potential in studying medicine

The University of Toledo will provide more than three dozen teens from across northwest Ohio a hands-on introduction to studying medicine during its annual CampMed program.

The students, all of whom will be high school freshmen this fall, will be on Health Science Campus Thursday and Friday, June 13 and 14.

Now in its 22nd year, CampMed gives students who excel in science and mathematics a window into what it’s like to pursue a career as a physician or medical researcher.

“We want to inspire these students and help give them an outline of how to prepare for an education in medicine,” said Courtney K. Combs, director of the UToledo and Ohio Area Health Education Center programs. “As much as CampMed is educational — and it really is — we also want it to be a fun time for the kids. It’s summer. It’s camp. It might be the first time they’re surrounded by kids their own age who have the same interests. We try to make it as hands-on as possible.”

Under the guidance of UToledo faculty members and physicians, the students will be taught Heartsaver CPR, learn how to suture, and practice forming a cast. They’ll also receive hands-on tours of the Emergency Department at The University of Toledo Medical Center, the gross anatomy lab, and the Jacobs Interprofessional and Immersive Simulation Center.

Second- and third-year medical students serve as camp counselors.

Most of the students who attend CampMed are underrepresented minorities in medicine, from underserved rural or urban communities, or the first in their family planning to attend college.

“We want to encourage these students to help them realize that a career in medicine is a realistic goal for them. Some of them may have never even been on a college campus before,” Combs said. “We want to provide that exposure to let them know if they work hard and are serious about their schoolwork now, this could be an option and The University of Toledo College of Medicine would welcome them.”

CampMed, which began in 1998, was implemented by and is coordinated through the UToledo Area Health Education Center program, which works to improve the well-being of individuals and communities by developing the health-care workforce.

The competitive scholarship program requires students to submit a letter of recommendation from a science or math teacher or guidance counselor, grade transcripts, and a personal essay to be chosen to participate.

Toledo football launches Rocket Reading Program

The University of Toledo football team is launching the Rocket Football Reading Program for students in kindergarten through eighth grade.

The Rocket Football Reading Program is designed to encourage kids to read over the summer while working toward a special incentive. The reward for completing the program is one free ticket to the Toledo football home opener against Murray State Saturday, Sept. 14, as well as a special on-field recognition at the game.

There are three separate specialized categories: kindergarten through second grade, third through fifth grade, and sixth through eighth grade.

The deadline to complete and turn in the program is Friday, Sept. 6, at 5 p.m. at the Rocket Ticket Office in Savage Arena.

More information, including specifics for each age group, can be found on the Rocket Reading Program webpage.

For questions or further information, contact Adam Simpson at adam.simpson@utoledo.edu or 419.530.2482.

Dana Cancer Center to hold annual survivor celebration June 6

The Eleanor N. Dana Cancer Center at The University of Toledo Medical Center will host its fifth annual Cancer Survivor Celebration Thursday, June 6.

“Each year of survivorship is a reason for joy,” said Renee Schick, manager of Renee’s Survivor Shop in the Dana Cancer Center. “We want to recognize and honor our patients and their caregivers for their strength and courage through the diagnosis and treatment of cancer.”

The annual event, which will take place from 5:30 to 8 p.m., honors and celebrates the Dana Cancer Center’s past and present patients, as well as their loved ones, for their strength, courage and survivorship.

Survivors and their guests will be treated to inspirational stories, food, music, a photo booth, and displays from a number of area support groups. Cancer treatment experts, including UTMC oncologist Dr. Danae Hamouda, also will be on hand.

This year’s guest speaker will be Dr. Michelle Masterson, a breast cancer survivor, retired associate professor and former director of the Physical Therapy Program in the College of Health and Human Services.

“I hope my story can inspire and help others to stay strong and positive, to fight hard, and to never give up,” Masterson said. “I also hope this celebration helps to get the word out to the Toledo community that we have excellent, expert, comprehensive and compassionate cancer care right here at the UTMC Dana Cancer Center.”

The event is free, but reservations are requested: Email eleanorndanacancercenter@utoledo.edu or call 419.383.5243.

Toledo football announces ‘150 Rocket Challenge’ ticket promotion

The University of Toledo announced a new football season ticket initiative for the 2019 season, the “150 Rocket Challenge,” to help celebrate the 150th anniversary of college football.

The Rockets have set a goal to sell 150 new season ticket orders in the month of June. As part of the promotion, a limited number of Sideline A season tickets Section 25 will be available for only $150 until Sunday, June 30; that’s a savings of $45 per season ticket. Fans also can opt to purchase other season ticket packages with prices starting as low as $70.

New season ticket purchases in the month of June will be entered to win an autographed football from Head Coach Jason Candle. A new winner will be selected after every 25 season ticket packages sold for a total of six winners. Winners will be selected on Facebook live and Instagram stories.

All season tickets purchased by 5 p.m. Friday, June 7, will receive $10 in Gino dollars, redeemable at any Original Gino’s Pizza location in the Toledo area.

The University of Toledo is joining the celebration of the 150th anniversary of college football with special events throughout the 2019 season. The Rockets will host a 150th anniversary commemoration game in the Glass Bowl vs. Kent State Tuesday, Nov. 5. The first college football game was played Nov. 4, 1869, between Rutgers and Princeton. Football began at The University of Toledo in 1917.

For more information, go to the Toledo Rockets’ website, call 419.530.GOLD (4653), or stop by the UT Athletic Ticket Office during business hours.

Strike out for fun: Build-A-Trust Bowl-A-Thon June 15

In the spirit of bringing people together, UToledo electrician George Hayes Jr. is throwing a bowling event for kids, cops, military members and firefighters.

On Saturday, June 15, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., the seventh Build-A-Trust Bowl-A-Thon will be held at Southwyck Lanes, 5255 Heatherdowns Blvd. in Toledo.

“I’ve been a youth bowling coordinator and coach since 2001 with the Toledo Bowling Senate Junior League,” Hayes said. “Because of all the issues going on with our youth today, I just wanted to do something in addition to the league where we can all try and build the trust level between the police and our youth.”

Courtesy of JCILH Inc. of McDonald’s, all youth 17 and younger bowl for free.

Other participants can bowl three games for $5 per person (shoes included).

Hayes explained this event is meant to knock down the walls and introduce youth to authority figures.

“This is a way to bring all groups together in a fun atmosphere — no pressure on anyone,” Hayes said.

“Some kids are afraid of the police, and some police are a little nervous around some kids and young adults. This is a way to bring all groups together in a fun atmosphere,” he added.

There will be music and door prizes at the event, which is expected to bring together more than 100 people.

The Toledo Bowling Senate junior coordinator started this the bowl-a-thon in 2015.

For more information, contact Hayes at george.hayes@utoledo.edu.

UToledo’s ‘Beer Professor,’ alumni entrepreneurs to speak at craft beer lecture and tasting June 13

The community is invited to attend the Craft Beer Lecture and Tasting Thursday, June 13, at 6 p.m. at The University of Toledo Center for Alumni and Donor Engagement, located at 4510 Dorr St.

Dr. Neil Reid, UToledo professor of geography and planning, affectionately known as the “Beer Professor,” will speak about the growth of the craft beer industry and the factors driving that growth. He teaches a class titled The Geography of Beer and Brewing.

Reid

Reid’s latest research about the impact of craft breweries on home values was featured in publications across the country, including Food & Wine magazine and Better Homes and Gardens.

“America is in the middle of a craft beer revolution,” Reid said. “Craft breweries often locate in neighborhoods that were once economically distressed. Thanks to the arrival of the craft brewery and other investments by both the public and private sector, many of these neighborhoods have become revitalized. In fact, our analysis shows living within a half mile of a craft brewery increased the average value of a single-family home by almost 10 percent, using Charlotte, N.C., as a case study.”

Representatives from two Toledo breweries and UToledo alumni also will discuss their journey from home brewers to brewery owners. Keefe Snyder, who graduated from the College of Engineering in 2006 and the College of Law in 2010, is a co-owner of Earnest Brew Works. Aaron Grizaniuk, who graduated from University College in 2005, co-owns Patron Saints Brewery.

The event costs $20 a person and includes eight 3-oz. beer samples and appetizers. The tasting is for people 21 and older.

To register, go to the Alumni Association website or call the Office of Alumni Engagement at 419.530.2586.

The event is hosted by the UToledo Arts and Letters and Engineering Alumni Affiliates.

Creativity blossoms with University’s Outdoor Sculpture Exhibition

A small flock of enigmatic birds intently gaze across Centennial Mall. A wayward sea turtle suns itself near the southwest corner of Bowman-Oddy Laboratories. And a wave rolls between UToledo Medical Center and Mulford Library.

“Birdzels” by Mark Chatterley, “Turtle” by Jonathan Bowling and “Blue Wave” by Mike Sohikian are three of the 10 new works installed for The University of Toledo’s 14th annual Outdoor Sculpture Exhibition.

Mark Chatterley’s “Birdzels” are perched on the west side of Centennial Mall.

“For me, ‘Birdzels’ were meant to be fun. They are a cross between anime, emojis and Angry Birds — with a little Snoop Dog mixed in,” Chatterley said and laughed. “They are made from high-fired clay with a crater glaze on the outside. I feel I am pushing the material to make it unrecognizable as clay.”

Bowling’s recycled reptile features a dredge scoop, railroad spikes, horseshoes and stove grates.

“Being able to make something from nothing is what I like to do,” Bowling said. “It’s economical, too.”

Thanks to the President’s Commission on Campus Design and Environment, new sculptures sprout up each spring.

“Big Blue X” by Brian Ferriby sits atop the hill west of University Hall, and Glenn Zweygardt’s stainless steel work titled “New Mexico Passage” shines on the west side of the Student Recreation Center.

Bernie Dominique’s geometric work “Four Square” can be found by the northeast side of Wolfe Hall, and Beau Bilenki’s engineering feat “Hole in One” is between Nitschke and Palmer halls.

A 250-pound fish flies near the University Parks Trail and Ottawa House with Michael Angelo Magnotta’s “Above the Waves.”

“My sculptures typically begin with a trip to the metal yard,” Magnotta said. “From the shapes and textures I rescue, a conversation takes place — a visual conversation — that results in my sculptures.”

“Turtle” by Jonathan Bowling sits near the southwest corner of Bowman-Oddy Laboratories.

Gregory Mendez’s forceful “Kometes” is located north of Ritter Planetarium, and Kenneth M. Thompson’s intricate “Laminated Stack, Triangle” sits on the east side of the Health and Human Services Building.

More than 180 artists submitted proposals to the Midwest Sculpture Initiative, and the President’s Commission on Campus Design and Environment reviewed the entries and selected pieces for this year’s exhibit.

Since the exhibition began, more than 130 sculptures have rotated through the display on UToledo campuses, and several have become part of the University’s collection courtesy of campus benefactors, colleges and departments.

Those wishing to make a gift to support the exhibition are encouraged to contact the UT Foundation at utfoundation@utoledo.edu or 419.530.7730.