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Sexual dysfunction may reveal underlying medical condition

Erectile dysfunction is a problem more common than men are willing to admit. Although it can be an uncomfortable topic, men shouldn’t shy away from discussing sexual health concerns with their physician.

Men’s health issues such as erectile dysfunction, low testosterone or incontinence are not only a quality of life concern, but also can be linked to potentially serious health risks, including heart disease, hypertension and diabetes.

Singla

Singla

June is Men’s Health Month, and UT Health physicians say it is an excellent time for men to take inventory of how they are feeling and to take action if they are experiencing sexual health symptoms. It is important for a man to schedule an appointment with a urologist if he experiences any the following:

• Erectile dysfunction with or without a decrease in sexual desire;

• Urinary incontinence or difficulty urinating;

• A lump or mass in the testicles;

• An elevated PSA level or abnormal prostate exam;

• Infertility;

• Andropause (male menopause); or

• Peyronie’s disease (penile curvature).

“Oftentimes we initially see a patient because he is having difficulty achieving or maintaining an erection,” said Dr. Ajay Singla, UT Health vice chair of urology and director of the UT Men’s Health Clinic. “We may then find the patient has an underlying medical condition such as diabetes, vascular disease or obesity causing his symptoms.”

The diagnosis and management of these conditions can be challenging and in some instances could require a more collaborative approach to treatment.

The UT Men’s Health Clinic opened in 2015 to provide the only comprehensive, multidisciplinary clinic of its kind in the region. Since that time, the clinic has grown from three specialists to a team of seven health-care providers in urology, cardiology, endocrinology, physical therapy, family medicine and nutrition.

“This collaboration allows us to treat the patient as a whole and address all of his health issues during one appointment,” Singla said. “We are finding our patients appreciate the convenience of seeing multiple specialists at one time and are pleased with the customized medical plans we provide.”

To better consolidate services, the UT Men’s Health Clinic is moving Tuesday, June 28, to the Regency Medical Campus located at 1000 Regency Court. The clinic sees patients on the fourth Tuesday of the month from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m.

The medical team’s emphasis is on common conditions affecting the urological, sexual and reproductive health of men. Services offered include surgical and non-surgical therapies for benign enlargement of the prostate, andropause, infertility, erectile dysfunction, premature ejaculation, permanent sterilization, varicocele, sexual dysfunction, Peyronie’s disease and incontinence.

To make an appointment for the clinic, call 419.383.4360.

New technology at UT Health is advancing prostate cancer screening and care

Advances in technology now available at UT Health allow physicians to reduce the risk of unnecessary prostate biopsies, more accurately diagnose cancer, and provide a clearer picture of treatment options available.

Each year in the United States, more than one million men undergo a prostate biopsy because of an elevated prostate-specific antigen known as PSA or abnormal rectal examination. Unfortunately, up to 800,000 of them will have undergone the invasive and risky procedure for no reason, as their biopsies are likely to be negative or show non-deadly, non-aggressive disease.

Dr. Samay Jain displayed an MRI that shows the anatomic detail of the bladder and the prostate.

Dr. Samay Jain displayed an MRI that shows the anatomic detail of the bladder and the prostate.

“For years, the traditional pathway for prostate cancer detection has been to perform a biopsy if a man had an abnormal PSA or rectal exam” said Dr. Samay Jain, vice chief of staff and division chief of urologic oncology at UT Health. “However, prostate biopsies have come under considerable fire as of late because of the significant risks of severe infection and death in certain cases.”

Fortunately, there is a better way, and it is available right here in northwest Ohio.

Advances in magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI technology, enable UT physicians to see inside the prostate in a safe and noninvasive manner to identify men who truly need biopsies.

“Prostate MRI allows us to see the prostate in a way that was never available before,” Jain said. “In the right hands, this information can be crucial in determining whether a man needs a risky biopsy or not.

“Not only does MRI help in deciding who needs a biopsy, but for those diagnosed with prostate cancer, the imaging we have aids in tailoring individual treatments for each individual patient.”

Should a patient need to undergo a biopsy, images from the MRI allow for more precise sampling from areas of concern and yield much higher cancer detection rates than performing prostate biopsies without the MRI technology.

June is Men’s Health Month, and Jain reminds men the key to early detection is starting the conversation with their physicians.

“It can be an uncomfortable topic. Men don’t like to talk about prostate screenings for a variety of reasons,” he said. “But it’s important to have the courage to broach the topic, even if their physicians don’t.

“Also, listen to your loved ones. I think there are many men who owe their lives to their wives and daughters for finally convincing them to schedule an appointment and get screened. By staying proactive, we are confident that we can decrease the number of men dying from prostate cancer in the near future.”

Current American Urological Association Guidelines recommend routine screening for healthy men between the ages of 55 and 69 and recommend a PSA and rectal exam every other year. Men outside of this age range should have a discussion with their doctor on whether prostate cancer screening is right for them.

Comfort dog calms patients, visitors at UT Medical Center

Patients, visitors and staff at The University of Toledo Medical Center may see a new furry face around the hospital.

Anna, a golden retriever and comfort dog from Trinity Lutheran Church and School, visits with patients and their families at UTMC to reduce stress, facilitate conversation and interaction, and brighten the atmosphere of the hospital.

Susan Chilcote Bagley smiled during a visit with Anna, a comfort dog from Trinity Lutheran Church and School, while she waited for her father to get out of surgery at UT Medical Center.

Susan Chilcote Bagley smiled during a visit with Anna, a comfort dog from Trinity Lutheran Church and School, while she waited for her father to get out of surgery at UT Medical Center.

“Anna has been very well received at UTMC,” said Nancy Borders, top dog trainer for Trinity Lutheran Church Ministry. “She often puts smiles on peoples’ faces and makes their day when they see her.”

When recently making the rounds, Anna met Susan Chilcote Bagley from Los Angeles; she was waiting for her father to get out of surgery.

“Any animal coming around calms you and makes you feel relaxed,” Bagley said. She added it was great to see Anna since she was missing her dogs back home.

UTMC Staff Nurse Hannah Aiyewunmi said Anna made a positive impact on her patient, James Mitchell. She said he expressed sadness for not having his family members around, and Anna improved his mood.

“She really did cheer me up; she made my day,” Mitchell said.

Anna has a team of 15 caregivers, handlers and assistant handlers from Trinity Lutheran Church and School, and at least two accompany her while she visits UTMC.

The canine came to Trinity Lutheran Church and School through Lutheran Church Charities in July 2015. Anna visits schools, nursing homes, fire stations and other locations in northwest Ohio, Indiana and Michigan. Through Lutheran Church Charities, Anna has received training on the same level as that of a service dog.

Lutheran Church Charities has more than 100 comfort dogs in churches throughout the country. They have responded to emergencies such as the shooting at Sandy Hook in Newton, Conn., the Boston Marathon bombing, and tornadoes in Illinois and Oklahoma.

UT duo collaborates on reflective publication

“I guess I didn’t realize everybody’s kitchen didn’t sometimes smell like oil paint and turpentine, and that it was unusual that sometimes when you got up in the middle of the night to go to the bathroom, your mom would be up at two in the morning painting,” Tim Sanderson reflected with a smile.

He cites his mother as a major influence for his interest in art.
“She would let you know if your art needed work, but she’d do it in a way that made you think, ‘Yeah, I can fix that.’”

“Schweinlebensraum” (“Living Space for Pigs as Pigs”), an original futuristic drawing by Tim Sanderson, was inspired by the counterfactual conjecture “If pigs could fly …” to accompany Dr. David Nemeth’s piece titled “Space, Time and Pig.”

“Schweinlebensraum” (“Living Space for Pigs as Pigs”), an original futuristic drawing by Tim Sanderson, was inspired by the counterfactual conjecture “If pigs could fly …” to accompany Dr. David Nemeth’s piece titled “Space, Time and Pig.”

Sanderson, college computing administrator, and Dr. David Nemeth, professor of geography, have worked collaboratively on several projects while at The University of Toledo — Nemeth writes, and Sanderson illustrates the sardonic works.

The pair most recently teamed up for their third collaborative piece; this one is about wild pigs. Nemeth explained that he examines what it would be like if pigs were free beings, rather than factory farmed for the sole purpose of being eaten.

“I took the popular idiom ‘If pigs could fly,’ which would mean something is totally impossible,” he said. “And yet, pigs can fly through technology and science, with planes and such. So, I’m thinking perhaps they can fly above their conditions of pigs as pork, and become pigs as pigs again.”

Sanderson recalled when Nemeth reached out to him about his most recent work: “When I asked what he needed me to draw, he said he wanted a post-modern, flying pig, and I told him I wasn’t even sure what that means.”

But Nemeth liked what Sanderson came up with, and the flying pig was included.

“The University is a real intellectual community, which is what a university is supposed to be,” Nemeth said. “It’d be great if we could make this a real collaborative, creative community.”

“Space, Time and Pig” will be published in Ecology, Conservation and Management of Wild Pigs and Peccaries (Cambridge University Press) later this year.

UT international students participate in community art project

Students of the Advanced Speaking and Listening: American Culture class recently shared their stories about strong women who have influenced them as part of the Sit&Tell Project.

Sit&Tell is a community-wide art project that brings together storytellers and artists to share positive, inspiring stories about strong women. The project began with 100 stories being shared March 20, National Storytelling Day.

Mohammed Alabbas, right, showed his Sit&Tell story to Mahdi Ghashi. Both are advanced American Language Institute students who were in the Advanced Speaking and Listening class spring semester.

Mohammed Alabbas, right, showed his Sit&Tell story to Mahdi Ghashi. Both are advanced American Language Institute students who were in the Advanced Speaking and Listening class spring semester.

Artists and designers then received the recorded stories and were tasked with interpreting them artistically on chairs. The chairs, which will have QR codes linking them to their respective stories, will be part of rolling exhibitions through Toledo neighborhoods this summer.

Sherris Schwind, English as a second language instructor of the Advanced Speaking and Listening class, participated in Sit&Tell by sharing her own story.

Aware of the hurdles international students face when coming to the United States, like language barriers and a totally foreign culture, Schwind wanted to give her students the opportunity to engage with the community and feel more included. After her own positive experience with the project, she spoke to Jenn Stucker, founder of the event, about bringing it to her classroom.

Once she got the go-ahead, Schwind instructed her class of international students to prepare their two-minute stories, which were recorded in spring semester.

The students’ stories included a variety of strong women, from mothers and sisters to models and daughters of prophets, and described the way those women inspired and changed their lives.

“[My aunt] affected my life. She came to America to study, she graduated in Florida, she never gives up. That’s why I came here to study,” said Yang Ming, advanced American Language Institute student.

Lin Yao, advanced American Language Institute student, told a story about his grandmother: “She gave me a lot of knowledge I can’t learn in school. She has a lot of power of love.”

One student spoke of her single mother’s success and struggles in raising nine children on her own, and another described his neighbor, an old woman who devoted her time to caring for a local man in need. Every student in the class had a story to share.

The project allowed these students to practice the English speaking and listening skills they need to excel in their classes at The University of Toledo, Schwind said.

For more information about Sit&Tell, visit sitandtell.com.

College of Medicine graduates ready to lead and serve

After countless hours of studying, hundreds of cups of coffee, and more than a few restless nights, students graduating from The University of Toledo College of Medicine and Life Sciences waited in anticipation in the wings of the Stranahan Theater before receiving their diplomas.

Waghulde

Waghulde

“It is so rewarding to finally have the title of doctor,” said Dr. Harshal Waghulde, who received his PhD in biomedical sciences at the college’s commencement ceremony May 27.

Waghulde was one of more than 170 students who received doctoral degrees.

Graduates and their guests listened as retired U.S. Air Force Maj. Gen. Susan Desjardins delivered a commencement address centered on the theme of public service. It was fitting as leadership, determination, focus and community seem to be the common threads of this graduating class.

“Our class is unique. Sure, we challenged each other, but it’s not about vanity and competition,” explained Dr. Josh Merris, who received his doctorate of medicine. “We pushed each other and learned from each other in order to get better. We respect each other and have built a community of support. It’s been a great experience.”

The path to commencement was rewarding, but challenging.

Sciplin

Sciplin

“Medical school was definitely a challenge. I missed family vacations and celebrations, and it was mentally draining,” said Dr. Rachael Sciplin, a doctor of medicine graduate. “My professors and family helped me to realize that the sacrifices were temporary and that I would come out of it better on the other side. I had to step out of my comfort zone and each success helped me to gain confidence.”

Waghulde is a first-generation college student from a small town in India, but he said the faculty and his colleagues made Toledo feel like home.

“There were many resources here for me to complete research and be on the front lines of cutting-edge science,” he said. “I am the first one in my family to go to college. I’m grateful for the opportunity to pursue a career in medicine.”

For Merris, balancing medical school and personal time with his wife and four young children was sometimes a challenge. He said his peers were supportive and respected his decision to go home after classes instead of joining them in the library or at social events.

Anisa and Joshua Merris smiled for the camera at Match Day with their children, from left, Daniel, Jonathan and Grace. Their fourth child, Michael, was born less than a month after Match Day.

Anisa and Joshua Merris smiled for the camera at Match Day with their children, from left, Daniel, Jonathan and Grace. Their fourth child, Michael, was born less than a month after Match Day.

“My classmates and instructors helped me to find balance. They encouraged me to put family first and to stay focused on the reasons I wanted to pursue medicine,” he said. “I credit my wife for my success. She kept everything running. She was the glue that held it all together while I was studying. I can’t thank her enough.”

With degree in hand, the graduates are ready to make a difference in the world by giving back.

Sciplin hopes to work in an outpatient clinic in an urban or underserved area, perhaps returning home to the Toledo region after completing her residency at the University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine in Tampa. Merris looks forward to making a difference in the lives of cancer patients. He will remain in Toledo for his first year of general residency before moving to Buffalo, N.Y., to begin in radiation oncology. Waghulde will continue his research during postdoctoral work at UT before returning to India.

“These and all of our graduates exemplify The University of Toledo’s mission,” said Dr. Christopher Cooper, executive vice president for clinical affairs and dean of the College of Medicine and Life Sciences. “They are poised to improve the human condition through compassionate care, new treatment methods and community service. They are ready to become leaders and agents of change.”

In all, 254 students received degrees: 169 earned doctor of medicine degrees, five received doctor of philosophy degrees, 65 received master’s degrees, and 15 received graduate certificates.

Local student attends renowned conference at Disney World

A Toledo high school student was awarded a trip to Disney World in March as part of a nationally competitive program.

Scott High School Senior Andre Matthews was selected to be part of the competitive 2016 Disney Dreamers Academy. TV host Steve Harvey and Essence magazine partnered with Disney for the four-day leadership conference that works to inspire students and motivate them to reach their goals.

Andre Matthews, left, posed for a photo with other high school students who attended the Disney Dreamers Academy this spring. Matthews, an Upward Bound student, will graduate from Scott High School this week.

Andre Matthews, left, posed for a photo with other high school students who attended the Disney Dreamers Academy this spring. Matthews, an Upward Bound student, will graduate from Scott High School this week.

During his stay, Matthews and the other students visited the Disney theme parks, attended workshops and seminars about their future career field, and met celebrities.

“I have to say, a session called Unplugged where Steve Harvey sat down with us, no cameras or anything else, he talked with us and told us how life works — that was my favorite part,” he said. “He was just real with us.”

Matthews plans to study graphic design and business management in college. His goal: to start his own T-shirt design company, which will allow him to implement his passion for art, particularly spray paint art.

He learned about the program from his Upward Bound mentor Alisha Durham.

“It’s an awesome experience,” she said. “It’s great exposure that allows you to see behind the scenes and speak to people. It’s one thing to speak to us as mentors, but to speak to famous people that have so many resources and see how they made it and how they give back was a great opportunity for him to experience.”

Durham is the associate director of UT’s Upward Bound, which helps high school students prepare and ultimately succeed in college.

Matthews will be at UT this summer as a member of the Multicultural Emerging Scholars Program, which is designed for first-year students to help them make the academic, social and cultural transition from high school to college and inspire success in the classroom.

According to Matthews, Disney Dreamers changed his outlook on life.

“As soon as I came back, I saw things differently at school and the people I was around,” he said. “It kind of gave me a boost of confidence and made me think ‘I can take on the world.’”

New sculptures blossom on campuses

As the spring air fills with fragrant lilacs and honeysuckle, like clockwork, new works of art dot the grounds of The University of Toledo.

Ready to share a secret, blooms adorn a bench wrapped by a twining vine and heart-shaped leaves near the north entrance of UT Medical Center. A figure leaps skyward toward a sphere on the west side of Savage Arena. And north of Libbey Hall, a silver flower sparkles as it pays tribute to an acclaimed American artist.

Jim Gallucci's “Listening Whisper Morning Glory Bench” beckons near the north entrance of UT Medical Center.

Jim Gallucci’s “Listening Whisper Morning Glory Bench” beckons near the north entrance of UT Medical Center.

Jim Gallucci’s “Listening Whisper Morning Glory Bench,” Mike Sohikian’s “Reaching for the Moon” and Douglas Gruizenga’s “Georgia on My Mind” are three of the new works featured in the 11th annual Outdoor Sculpture Exhibition.

Gallucci, and artist in Greensboro, N.C., said his benches are whimsical, playful pieces that invite the public to sit and talk. “Good art challenges us, can make us feel righteous, moves us, soothes us, and can bring us peace,” he said.

Mike Sohikian's “Reaching for the Moon” is located on the west side of Savage Arena.

Mike Sohikian’s “Reaching for the Moon” is located on the west side of Savage Arena.

A retired ironworker, Sohikian has a reputation for taking salvaged steel to new heights. The Genoa, Ohio, artist assembles and reworks industrial materials into riveting creations.

Paintings inspired Gruizenga of Interlochen, Mich. “I am impressed with Georgia O’Keeffe’s floral paintings as well as her lust for life,” he said. “This sculpture is a tribute to her.”

The trio are among more than 50 who submitted proposals for consideration to the Midwest Sculpture Initiative. The UT Campus Beautification Committee reviewed the entries and selected pieces that recently were installed.

“It’s an honor to have the chance to be part of this annual exhibition, which brings exciting pieces of art to the University,” said Dr. Steve LeBlanc, executive associate dean of fiscal affairs in the College of Engineering and chair of the Campus Beautification Committee. “I love this time of year when all the new pieces arrive.”

More than 100 sculptures have rotated through the display at the University since the exhibit began, and 11 have become part of UT’s art collection thanks to the generosity of campus benefactors, colleges and departments, according to LeBlanc.

North of Libbey Hall, “Georgia on My Mind” by Douglas Gruizenga honors artist Georgia O'Keeffe.

North of Libbey Hall, “Georgia on My Mind” by Douglas Gruizenga honors artist Georgia O’Keeffe.

Other new works on campus this year:

• “Metropolis” is a 250-pound steel geometric piece featuring an eye-catching blue orb. Forged by the Nordin Brothers, the sculpture sits atop the hill west of University Hall.

• Todd Kime’s “The Joneses” offers some splashes of color in the center of Centennial Mall.

• “Ashes III,” Sam Soet’s intricate slice of ash wood, is located between University Hall and the Student Union.

“Ashes III” by Sam Soet sits between University Hall and the Student Union.

“Ashes III” by Sam Soet sits between University Hall and the Student Union.

• The Nordin Brothers weigh in again with “Time Series Calendra,” a hot-rolled steel work located on the west side of the Health and Human Services Building.

In addition, three sculptures from last year’s exhibit remain: Virginia Kistler’s 500-pound piece of Extira and steel, “Ad Infinitum,” appears to rotate between Nitschke and Palmer halls; Ric Leichliter’s steel red buds,“Promise to Flower,” sprout on the east side of the Health and Human Services Building; and Tom Rudd’s 9-foot, 1,000-pound “Whitefish” still swims south of Carlson Library near the Ottawa River.

Artists receive stipends for the sculptures, which will be on display for the next year.

LeBlanc said gifts from donors make the annual exhibition possible.

“Those who enjoy the sculptures are asked to consider a donation to the Campus Beautification Committee through the UT Foundation,” he said.

Go to https://give2ut.utoledo.edu.

Expert focuses on treating skin cancer with prevention during awareness month

While many people remember to protect themselves from sunburn when it’s sunny outside, University of Toledo Health physicians recommend taking daily precautions to prevent developing skin cancer because harmful rays from the sun can penetrate cloud cover and cause skin damage.

One in five people will develop skin cancer, making it the most common cancer in the United States with nearly six million cases treated each year. May is National Skin Cancer Awareness and Prevention Month, and is a good time to review how to protect yourself from the sun.

skincancerawarenessDr. Prabir Chaudhuri, professor and surgical director of the University’s Eleanor N. Cancer Center, recommends avoiding the sun during its peak hours of 10 a.m. and 3 p.m., if possible. If exposure is unavoidable, take these precautions:

• Wear lightweight, long-sleeve shirts, hats and sunglasses;

• Liberally apply a broad-spectrum sunscreen of at least 15 SPF every day and reapply often, especially when sweating or swimming; and

• Do not assume a “base tan” protects you from sunburn or UV damage.

“Using a tanning bed in an effort to avoid sunburn and skin damage is a myth. Tanning beds use intense UVA rays to darken skin, but UVB rays from the sun are what cause sunburns,” Chaudhuri said. “Both are dangerous, and we know that tanning, whether indoors or out, causes cumulative DNA damage to the skin, which can result in skin cancer.”

Melanoma is most common among older adults and senior citizens, but Chaudhuri said people of all ages can develop these malignant tumors.

“People with dysplastic nevi, a family history of skin cancer, extreme sun exposure or who have medical conditions that suppress the immune system need to be particularly vigilant in protecting themselves against melanoma,” Chaudhuri said. “Children are especially at risk because they have their whole lives to accumulate skin damage due to sun exposure.”

Dysplastic nevi are benign moles that can appear on any part of the body. They range in size and can be light pink to very dark brown in color. Dysplastic nevi are usually genetic and start to appear in late childhood and may increase in number with age. As many as one in 14 individuals have at least one of these atypical moles.

One of Chaudhuri’s patients said he monitors his skin carefully for changes because dysplastic nevi run in his family.

“I have a lot of moles, and I’m always looking for changes in their color and shape,” Thomas Fischer said. “I’ve had two melanoma removed. It makes me very anxious because I am likely to get it again, and I know it can progress. It’s important to keep up with it.”

Regular skin self-exams are important in identifying potential skin cancers. All areas of skin should be checked, not just areas that see regular sun exposure. Melanomas have been found on the scalp, groin areas and bottoms of the feet. The appearance of any skin irregularities or changes in existing moles should be examined by a trained physician in an effort to find and treat melanoma in its earliest stages.

“I visit Dr. Chaudhuri every six months now due to my risk of recurrence,” Fischer said. “After spending years at the lake, skiing and getting tan, I realize there’s a tradeoff. All that sun catches up to you eventually.”

Chaudhuri said a checkup takes just a few minutes and problem spots can be identified and removed quickly.

“If caught early, melanoma typically responds well to treatment, but the best treatment for any disease is always prevention,” he said.

UT grad student travels to Guatemala for vaccination research before graduation [video]

“This has been my first official full day in Guatemala,” said Jessica Schulte in a cell phone selfie video while resting on the front steps of a medical clinic in a remote village of Central America.

The master of public health student, who will graduate May 27 from The University of Toledo College of Medicine and Life Sciences, recently journeyed 3,000 miles to Petén for a research project to earn her global health certificate.

Jessica Schulte held a child she met during a weeklong trip to conduct research at an OB/GYN clinic in Petén, Guatemala.

Jessica Schulte held a child she met during a weeklong trip to conduct research at an OB/GYN clinic in Petén, Guatemala.

The 24-year-old set up shop for about a week in Petén at an OB/GYN clinic founded by Toledo doctors and UT alumni Anne and Dr. Randy Ruch.

Randy, an associate professor of biochemistry and cancer biology, is Schulte’s faculty advisor at UT.

“They asked if I wanted to go down to Guatemala and actually gather data for my project instead of just reading other studies,” Schulte said.

“We’ve brought many types of students, from undergraduate students to medical students to physician assistant students and physical therapy students,” Randy said.

“I’m sure we’ve seen at least 20,000 patients over the years,” said Anne Ruch, a gynecologist who first visited Petén during a mission trip nearly 20 years ago. “We saw these people living in a garbage dump in the middle of the city and it was so overwhelming to me. The women will often come four or five hours to get to the clinic in a morning. They’ll leave their house at three or four o’clock in the morning.”

Schulte, an epidemiology major who studies the distribution of disease in large groups, surveyed mothers to learn firsthand the barriers to vaccinations for women and children living in poverty in Third-World countries.

Jessica Schulte interviewed a patient, left, with the help of her translator in Petén, Guatemala. The master of public health student conducted research at an OB/GYN clinic during a recent trip.

Jessica Schulte interviewed a patient, left, with the help of her translator in Petén, Guatemala. The master of public health student conducted research at an OB/GYN clinic during a recent trip.

“Before they went to the doctor to get a pap smear or other exam, I was at a table interviewing them,” Schulte said.

Schulte has participated in several medical mission trips as a UT college student.

“The University of Toledo is very diverse,” Schulte said. “Seeing the diversity on campus has opened my eyes into the rest of the world. We’re in this bubble of Toledo, Ohio, and the United States, but what is happening outside of the United States, especially in Third-World countries?”

Every year UT awards more than $100,000 in travel grants to students who study abroad, whether it be for a semester in major cities or a few weeks in remote villages like Petén.

“Meeting everyone has been wonderful,” Schulte narrated in her cell phone video from the clinic steps. “The people are so willing to take part in my survey. They line up before we even get to the clinic. They wait hours if there are tons of people, and they don’t complain.”

“I hope not only that students see what the rest of the world looks like, and they understand that being an American has tremendous privilege and therefore they need to give back,” Randy said.

“Every person that comes on a trip, I say, ‘You know why I brought you here … because I’m counting on you guys to change the world,’” Anne said.

“I have this passion for global health,” Schulte said. “I have this passion to bring back my knowledge to the underserved in the Toledo area. It’s a passion I’m going to have for the rest of my life.”

The College of Medicine and Life Sciences commencement ceremony will be held Friday, May 27, at 2 p.m. at the Stranahan Theater.

After graduation, Schulte plans to go back to school in UT’s physician assistant graduate program to earn a master of science in biomedical sciences.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vscJrDUiepc