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Former Ohio Supreme Court Justice donates papers to UT

Former Ohio Supreme Court Justice and Toledo native Judith Ann Lanzinger recently donated her personal papers to the Ward M. Canaday Center for Special Collections at The University of Toledo.

Lanzinger, who is the only person ever elected to all four levels of Ohio’s judiciary, retired from the state’s highest court in 2016.

Former Ohio Supreme Court Justice and UT law alumna Judith Ann Lanzinger, second from left, recently donated her personal papers to the Ward M. Canaday Center for Special Collections. She posed for a photo with, from left, Lauren White, manuscripts librarian and lecturer; D. Benjamin Barros, dean of the College of Law; and Barbara Floyd, director of the Canaday Center and interim director of University Libraries, who propped up a 2007 portrait of justices from the Supreme Court of Ohio.

During her long career, she also served on the 6th District Court of Appeals, the Lucas County Court of Common Pleas and the Toledo Municipal Court.

The Canaday Center, the special collections department of the UT Libraries, has long collected manuscript materials related to the history of women in northwest Ohio. Noteworthy collections include the papers of educators, politicians and activists such as Linda Furney, Betty Mauk, Betty Morais, Mary Boyle Burns, Ella P. Stewart and Olive Colton. The center recently has begun collaborating with the College of Law to preserve the history of Toledo’s women lawyers and judges.

“We are delighted to help ensure this important history is accessible to future scholars and citizens,” said D. Benjamin Barros, dean of the College of Law.

As part of this collaboration with the College of Law, the center also recently acquired a collection of scrapbooks documenting the career of Geraldine Macelwane, the first woman elected judge of the Toledo Municipal Court (appointed in 1952) and the first woman judge of the Lucas County Common Pleas Court (appointed in 1956). She died in 1974.

“Justice Lanzinger is one of our most distinguished alumni, having notably served at all levels of the Ohio judiciary. We are honored that the University is able to house her papers, which we hope will encourage and inspire others to civic engagement,” Barros said.

The Lanzinger collection contains photographs, awards and research files documenting her judicial career. Of particular note are the former justice’s case notes that provide insight into her thoughts and opinions as they developed during trials.

“This collection will provide a rich source of information on many aspects of Justice Lanzinger’s career,” said Barbara Floyd, director of the Canaday Center and interim director of University Libraries. “We hope to continue to collect and preserve the papers of other women lawyers and judges from this area to add to these collections.”

Lanzinger said, “I am honored that the Ward M. Canaday Center has accepted these documents that represent my 31 years of service at all levels of Ohio’s judiciary. I hope they may be of help in future academic projects at The University of Toledo, my alma mater.”

For more information on the collection, contact Floyd at 419.530.2170.

Football coach signs contract extension through 2021

The University of Toledo and Head Football Coach Jason Candle have agreed to a contract extension through the 2021 season.

Candle led the Rockets to a 9-4 record and an appearance in the Raycom Media Camellia Bowl in his first full season as Toledo’s head coach in 2016. He took over the head coaching position at the end of the 2015 regular season, leading UT to a 32-17 victory over No. 24 Temple in the Marmot Boca Raton Bowl. Before assuming the head coaching position, Candle had been an assistant at Toledo for seven years, the last four as the program’s offensive coordinator.

Candle

“We are very pleased to announce the extension of Jason Candle’s contract through the 2021 season,” Vice President and Athletic Director Mike O’Brien said. “Jason has played a very important part of the success of our football program over the last eight years, first as an assistant coach and now as head coach. He is a tremendous leader and teacher of young men, and has a great desire to elevate our football program to even greater heights. We look forward to his leadership for many years to come.”  

“I’m very appreciative of the support and confidence that President Gaber and Mike O’Brien have in me and my staff,” Candle said. “Our program is built on a strong foundation of success, and we are focused on bringing a Mid-American Conference Championship to this great University.”

Candle, a native of Salem, Ohio, began his coaching career at his alma mater, Mount Union, in 2003. He was a part of four NCAA Division III national championships with the Purple Raiders, two as a player and two as an assistant coach.

He joined Toledo in 2009 as a receivers coach and moved into the offensive coordinator position in 2012. Under Candle’s guidance as offensive coordinator, the Rocket offense was prolific. In 2014, UT led the MAC in just about every major offensive category, including scoring (36.6), total offense (490.5) and rushing offense (256.4), en route to a 9-4 record and a victory over Arkansas State in the GoDaddy Bowl. In 2015, the Rockets were 10-2 and ranked third in the MAC in scoring (35.0) and total offense (460.9).

Candle was named one of the top recruiters in the nation by Rivals in 2010. He was named the Mid-American Conference “Recruiter of the Year” by Scout.com in 2011 and 2012. In 2014, Candle was one of only two MAC assistant coaches to be named by Rivals as being among the top recruiters in the Group of Five football conferences.

Since taking over as head coach, Candle’s recruiting success has continued. Despite having just weeks to put together a staff at the conclusion of the 2015 season, Toledo’s 2016 class was ranked No. 2 in the MAC by ESPN. This past February, the 2017 Rocket recruiting class was rated No. 1 in the MAC by every major recruiting service.

UT, Owens Community College create Rocket Express Dual Admission Program

The presidents of The University of Toledo and Owens Community College signed a dual-admission partnership called Rocket Express March 16 in Libbey Hall on Main Campus.

Rocket Express is designed to provide a seamless pathway to a bachelor’s degree from UT starting at Owens Community College.

Owens Community College President Mike Bower and UT President Sharon L. Gaber posed for photos after signing a dual-admission partnership called Rocket Express last week in Libbey Hall. They were joined by Big E and Rocksy.

“The new Rocket Express Dual Admission Program is a wonderful opportunity for students to save time and money,” UT President Sharon L. Gaber said. “We are proud to strengthen our relationship with Owens Community College to help students succeed and achieve the dream of earning a degree. This program will ensure a smooth, more efficient transition from Owens to UT and further contribute to helping the region.”

Students apply once for dual admission, work to complete their program of study at Owens, and then transition to UT with help along the way from both Owens and UT student and academic services.

New and continuing Owens students who meet qualifications can apply to take advantage of the program that guarantees admission to UT and charts a course to a four-year degree. With the help of a transfer specialist, this option allows students to save time by only taking classes that count toward their specific degree. 

“The seamless process of the Rocket Express program effectively removes any potential barriers that could hinder students from transferring from Owens to UT,” said Owens President Mike Bower. “The goal of both institutions is student success by offering programs that allow them to earn a degree and enter the workforce as smoothly as possible.”

Students can apply to enroll for the summer and fall semesters.

Currently, approximately 350 students a year transfer to UT after starting at Owens.

For more information, go to utoledo.edu/admission/rocket-express.

Students to participate in day of service around Toledo March 25

More than 1,000 students along with faculty and staff from The University of Toledo will be giving back to the community by participating in the Big Event Saturday, March 25, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Volunteers will work around the University’s campus as well as at downtown sites, where they will pick up garbage, rake leaves, paint, and pull weeds.

The annual Big Event is the largest, one-day, student-run service project at the University when students come together to say “thank you” to the residents of Toledo, Bancroft Hills and Secor Gardens for their continual support throughout the years.

At last year’s event, more than 1,400 students provided approximately 6,300 hours of service to the community in just one day.

“For some of our community participants, the Big Event represents a chance to get work done that might be beyond the resident’s abilities,” said Dr. Page Armstrong, associate lecturer in the Jesup Scott Honors College and faculty adviser for the event. “It has become an annual part of their lives and they can count on UT students to be there once a year to help.

“The Big Event is a great way to let the Toledo community interact with our students and to see what a wonderful resource our students and UT are to the community.”

Participants will meet at the Student Recreation Center before going out into the community for their volunteer projects.

The Big Event is a national organization that was started at Texas A&M in 1982. The University of Toledo’s chapter is entirely student-run and funded by donations from the community.

To register, go to orgsync.com/104109/forms/242712.

Science museum president to discuss career, empowering roles for women

Dr. Tonya Matthews, president and chief executive officer of the Michigan Science Center in Detroit, will speak Monday, March 27, at 6 p.m. in Nitschke Hall Room 1027.

Matthews was selected by Crain’s Detroit Business as one of the 100 most influential women in Michigan in 2016. Selections were determined by impact, diversity and proven leadership.

Matthews

Since she was named president and CEO of the Michigan Science Center in 2013, Matthews has led an effort to take STEMM (science, technology, engineering, math and medicine) programs into the community. The center also started offering adult programming and professional development for teachers; launched STEM Vision Awards to recognize students and adult leaders; and started the Michigan Student Test of Educational Progress to spark STEMM spark interest among fourth- through eighth-grade girls.

“The talk will focus on Dr. Matthews’ experiences in the STEMM community as a woman and how she was able to incorporate her passion,” said Kelley Webb, a graduate assistant of the African American Initiatives in the Office of Multicultural Student Success. “Dr. Matthews is able to relate to many people on many levels. They will learn about grace and grit, how she got to where she is and why.”

According to the National Science Foundation, scientific and technological innovations have become increasingly important with benefits and challenges of both globalization and a knowledge-based economy. Students need to develop their capabilities in STEMM to higher levels than were needed in the past.

“Dr. Matthews is well-known in the STEMM community, and she is very down-to-earth,” Webb said. “I believe that she exhibits the qualities that many women, especially black women, desire to develop, and she is doing something positive in a growing field.”

Matthews received a bachelor’s degree in biomedical and electrical engineering from Duke University and a doctorate in biomedical engineering from Johns Hopkins University. She was a biomedical engineer for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and worked at museums in Maryland and Ohio.

The free talk is sponsored by We Are STEMM, the Office of Multicultural Student Success, African American Initiatives and NaturalHAIRitage.

Matthews’ visit is one of the University’s events scheduled for Women’s History Month.

UT will evaluate 11 programs as part of state-mandated review

The University has recently received several requests from the state government.

The state legislature has asked each state university to evaluate courses and programs based on enrollment and student performance.

Gov. John Kasich’s Task Force on Affordability and Efficiency recommended that institutions also consider consolidating programs that are duplicated at other colleges or universities in their geographic area. That task force charged the Ohio Department of Higher Education with identifying duplicative programs within each region of the state.

In response to these mandates, The University of Toledo has identified 11 low-enrollment programs from the list of duplicative programs provided by the state for further review. UT’s list was presented to the UT Board of Trustees March 20.

Included on UT’s list for further evaluation are the academic areas of American studies, Asian studies, German, French, digital arts, global studies and art history in the College of Arts and Letters; general business and commerce in the College of Business and Innovation; athletic training in the College of Health and Human Services; and general geology and clinical laboratory science in the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics. UT is working with Bowling Green State University on the possibility of collaboration in some of these areas.

Dr. Andrew Hsu, provost and executive vice president for academic affairs, plans to work with the faculties of the programs on the list and a campus-wide faculty committee to develop recommendations for each program. There are three options: maintaining and enhancing the programs, eliminating a program, or collaborating with Bowling Green State University.

“We will ask the Faculty Senate to review this initial report and work with the faculty of the various programs to determine the best course of action,” Hsu said. “The state wants to make sure we take a careful look and do things that make sense. We are always vigilant. A couple of the programs have already initiated change. For example, athletic training is transitioning from a bachelor’s degree program to a graduate-level program. The business and commerce program no longer accepts students.”

Programs are evaluated on a variety of factors, including quality, centrality to the University’s mission, cost-effectiveness and demand.

UT’s final action plan is due Dec. 31.

International Joint Commission invites public to meeting at UT Lake Erie Center March 23

The International Joint Commission, an independent binational organization that prevents and resolves issues facing boundary waters between the U.S. and Canada, is holding a public meeting at The University of Toledo Lake Erie Center this week to gather input about progress to restore and protect the Great Lakes.

The free, public event will take place Thursday, March 23, at 6 p.m. at the UT Lake Erie Center, 6200 Bayshore Road in Oregon.

It is one of six public meetings being held in communities around the Great Lakes throughout March as the commission finalizes its assessment of progress made by the U.S. and Canada to reach goals of the U.S.-Canada Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement.

Dr. Christine Mayer, UT professor and aquatic ecologist, serves as a member of the International Joint Commission Great Lakes Science Advisory Board, which studies Great Lakes issues and provides its findings to help the International Joint Commission make recommendations to the governments of the two countries.

“Residents of the Great Lakes region deserve clean water, healthy beaches and fish that are safe to eat,” Mayer said. “I encourage residents of northwest Ohio to attend the International Joint Commission meeting and provide their feedback on progress toward restoration of the Great Lakes. Now is a crucial time for the public to voice their support for sustained restoration of the Great Lakes.”

With more than $12.5 million of active grants underway to address water quality concerns, UT faculty and researchers are taking a multidisciplinary approach to protecting the nation’s Great Lakes from invasive species and providing clean drinking water for generations to come.

“I am delighted that the public meeting for the International Joint Commission will be held at The University of Toledo Lake Erie Center,” said Dr. Tim Fisher, geology professor, chair of the UT Department of Environmental Sciences and interim director of the Lake Erie Center. “The citizens of Oregon and Toledo will not have to travel far to learn about ongoing research on harmful algae blooms, restoration and protection plans for Lake Erie, and the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. But most importantly, the public will have an opportunity to express their suggestions, views and concerns to this binational agency to influence future activity.”

According to the Ohio Environmental Council, Lake Erie supplies drinking water to roughly three million Ohioans, and visitors spend more than $10 billion a year in communities along Lake Erie for tourism, travel and fishing.

“This meeting in Toledo — and all six of the International Joint Commission’s public meetings — is integral to the the commission’s assessment process,” said Lana Pollack, chair of the U.S. section of the International Joint Commission. “We want to hear what people think about the government’s progress report and the International Joint Commission’s draft assessment of progress, and hear their views on how governments should address the Great Lakes water quality issues that residents care about the most.”

The International Joint Commission’s draft report, the Canadian and U.S. government report, as well as details on the upcoming public meetings around the Great Lakes, can be found at http://participateijc.org.

Event registration is online here and will be available at the door as well.

Ohio Sixth District Court of Appeals to hold oral arguments at UT College of Law March 22

On Wednesday, March 22, UT law students and members of the public will get to experience a morning of appellate court arguments when the Ohio Sixth District Court of Appeals holds oral arguments in the Law Center McQuade Law Auditorium.

Oral arguments at the free, public session will begin at 9 a.m., and the final case will be argued starting at 10:15 a.m.

Presiding over oral arguments will be a panel of three judges from the Ohio Sixth District Court of Appeals: The Hon. Arlene Singer, a 1976, UT law alumna; Thomas J. Osowick, a 1981 UT law alumnus; and Christine E. Mayle. The judges will hear four cases:

• Romstadt v. Garcia, et al. is a personal injury lawsuit in which the plaintiff was injured when hit by a vehicle owned and insured by defendant-appellee but driven by her son. The issue on summary judgment was limited to the question of whether the son had his mother’s permission to drive the vehicle at the time of the accident. Plaintiff now argues that summary judgment was inappropriate because of material inconsistencies in the mother’s deposition testimony and because the question turned on the credibility of the mother’s testimony.

• In State of Ohio v. Whites Landing Fisheries Inc., the defendant-appellee was charged by the state under the Ohio Revised Code and Ohio Administrative Code with three counts of illegally harvesting yellow perch from a part of Lake Erie for which the annual quota was zero. The defendant-appellee alleged in its motion to dismiss that the definition of “Lake Erie yellow perch management units” in the code provision was unconstitutionally void for vagueness. The appeal is from a grant of a motion to dismiss based on the unconstitutionality of a penal provision.

• State of Ohio v. Brandeberry involves a guilty plea and sentencing order for a juvenile prosecuted as an adult for charges of arson and murder. On appeal, the defendant challenges the constitutionality of the mandatory transfer and sentencing provisions that resulted in defendant being prosecuted and sentenced as an adult. The constitutional challenges allege violations of due process and equal protection, as well as ineffective assistance of counsel.

• In State of Ohio v. Greely, the appeal is from a sentencing order after a guilty plea to charges of aggravated burglary and rape. For purposes of sentencing, the court treated the aggravated burglary and rape counts as dissimilar offenses and ordered separate and consecutive sentences. The defendant argues that the court erred in treating the offenses as dissimilar and imposing consecutive sentences.

Experiencing appellate arguments firsthand will be especially helpful for first year UT law students. As part of their Lawyering Skills II course, each law student must research and write an appellate brief and then present an oral argument on behalf of a fictional client.

“The opportunity for students to observe judges and lawyers in a real court session is a valuable learning experience in our oral advocacy curriculum,” said Terrell Allen, UT legal writing professor and director of the College of Law’s legal research, writing and appellate advocacy program. “We appreciate the court’s willingness to provide this useful experience and instruction for our students.”

Mock trial team brings regional trophy back to UT

The UT Mock Trial Team is continuing a tradition of excellence. Over the years, the team has earned national championship titles 10 times, and may be on its way to another.

“After their outstanding performance at the regional tournament, The University of Toledo’s Mock Trial Team has received a bid to represent our region at the Opening Round Championship,” said John Schlageter, coach of the team, program director and senior lecturer for the Paralegal Studies Program.

Members of the UT mock trial team posed for a photo after winning a bid to the Opening Round Championship Tournament at the Cleveland Regional Tournament. They are, from left, Joshua Yeager, Kyle Zapadka, Travis Peterson, Taylor Sanders, Colleen Anderson, Andrea Bonds, Elizabeth Layhew and Rachel Schneider.

UT went head to head with 16 other schools, including Case Western, Ohio State University, Cornell University, and Michigan State, at the competition Feb. 25 and 26 at the Cleveland Justice Center.

The team is preparing for its next competition, practicing case materials in the McQuade Courtroom in the Health and Human Services Building. Both the regional and championship tournaments consist of four rounds of competition, in which teams are required to perform twice as plaintiff and twice as defense.

The American Mock Trial Association hosts the competitions from February through April, alternating between a civil case and a criminal case each year. This year, teams are representing both sides of a civil case for wrongful termination. Each round must consist of three witnesses and three student attorneys, as well as one direct and one cross-examination.


Schlageter noted that participation on the team is open to and benefits all majors: “The mock trial experience is a value-creating activity open to all students regardless of major. Team members must demonstrate abilities to communicate meaningfully, persuasively and creatively to a jury. Communication students may learn how to speak effectively in public. Theatre students may learn how to perfect their craft playing the role of attorney or witness. Business students may learn how to give a persuasive presentation. Any student that desires to master the ability to communicate meaningfully, persuasively and creatively with different audiences through written, oral, numeric, graphic and visual modes would benefit greatly through mock trial.”

The Opening Round Championship will be held Friday through Sunday, March 24-26, in Hamilton, Ohio.

“I am very proud of the dedication and hard work exhibited by our team. Our team is committed to getting even better in preparation for the upcoming championship tournament,” Schlageter said. “These students bring back an understanding of the high regard our judicial system merits and the protection it affords all of our citizens.”

Partners Against Trafficking in Humans assists victims on path to recovery

A $75,000 grant from the Toledo Community Foundation made to The University of Toledo will support the work of the Partners Against Trafficking in Humans Project.

The project aims to help move victims of human trafficking to survivors and survivors to thrivers through a coordinated, transparent and data-driven response, and is coordinated and overseen by the UT Human Trafficking and Social Justice Institute.

Fanell Williams, project coordinator of Partners Against Trafficking in Humans in the UT School of Justice, said the project is based on a modified replica of the Pathways Model, which addresses the issue of Ohio’s infant mortality rate and works to improve birth outcomes in low-income, high-risk African-American mothers. This is also the first project in the nation to implement the Pathways Model to study a local community’s response to human trafficking.

“The goal of Partners Against Trafficking in Humans is to become an evidence-based model that can be used nationally for providing the best care coordination to assist victims of human trafficking on their path to recovery and restoration,” Williams said. “Creating a system of services that has the potential to restore individuals to the level of mental, emotional and physical well-being and economic stability they would have reached had they not been trafficked is a huge part of the vision.”

The project focuses on five main objectives: train professionals to increase their ability to identify and engage with victims of human trafficking and trafficked clients; provide highly trained care coordinators to effectively assess and intervene; produce high-quality individualized service plans and services that address individual needs; determine barriers and strengths and service delivery using a data-driven process of evaluation and response; and identify the continuum of care of victims to survivors and survivors to thrivers through continued data analysis and feedback.

Partners Against Trafficking in Humans has worked with several Lucas County organizations, including the Hospital Council of Northwest Ohio, the Lucas County Human Trafficking Coalition, as well as numerous social service agencies that provide support, social, legal and health-care services.

According to Williams, local agencies can become approved partners by receiving training on human trafficking and/or trauma-informed care, signing a memorandum of understanding, and by providing a point of contact that will join the coalition and guide care coordinators and clients through their system of services.

Over the span of nine months, 800 professionals from criminal justice, health care, mental health and substance abuse, and various social services, have been trained on human trafficking, trauma-informed care, and the Partners Against Trafficking in Humans Model. The project is based in Lucas County, but will be expanded to other counties and states in the following years, according to Williams.

Through Partners Against Trafficking in Humans, 10 services have been identified as extremely beneficial for victims of human trafficking: trafficking education; legal; basic needs; injury, impairment and supports; mental health; services for dependents of clients; substance abuse treatment; support systems and life skills; empowerment; and health care.

“Partners Against Trafficking in Humans, in just the name, lets us know this is not a one person or one organization effort. This coordinated and collaborative response to human trafficking puts a mandate on local organizations to partner together to move a victim to survivor to thriver on her or his individual path of healing and recovery,” Williams said. “We know the cliché, ‘It takes a village to raise a child.’ It takes a community to work together in an organized manner to combat an issue while creating and sustaining positive change.”